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Messages - denny

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31
Beer Recipes / Re: Sierra Nevada Celebration
« on: October 10, 2017, 08:06:43 AM »
Hmm, so no chocolate malt huh? The Sierra Nevada site doesn't give me an SRM but I can make a good guess. I have to plug the numbers but here is what I am thinking:

12 lb. (5.44 kg) 2 row malt
1 lb. (0.45 kg) 60° L crystal malt
8 oz. (227 g) 120° L crystal malt

Then have 2 oz chocolate malt on hand in case it is not red enough.

Still off.  Nothing but pale and 60L.  I guarantee it.

32
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Trub after bottling.
« on: October 08, 2017, 01:33:42 PM »
I was guessing you'd speak to this Denny.  I guess I'm a bit of a hard sell on this since I've experienced some long carb times and some short carb times, and one failed carb when bottle conditioning and I just apply my own intuition on this.  I don't know if you'd accept "YMMV" as my recommendation.   8)

You have your experience and that'd hard to argue with.  I and many others have had a different experience.  That's not to discount yours.

33
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Trub after bottling.
« on: October 08, 2017, 12:41:27 PM »
Let's see if I understand your process correctly.

Some yeasts are more flocculant than others, hence some will have more yeast left in suspension at bottling, given bottling with room temp beer as a rule of thumb.

I just would caution you about cold crashing if you will be bottling with added sugar to naturally carbonate the beer.  IMHO you don't want to drop out too much of the suspended yeast.  That is, my first concern would be to have sufficient yeast left in suspension at bottling to do a quick and thorough job of naturally carbonating the bottled beer.

Heck yeah, you're going to have some extra yeast left in the bottle anyway created during bottle conditioning and so will be decanting the beer anyway.

I don't know if you've tried it, but I've found that there's plenty of yeast even after a couple months of cold crashing.

34
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beware the Homebrew circa 1920
« on: October 08, 2017, 11:40:19 AM »
Those are great!  Thanks for posting them, guys.

35
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: It's Official
« on: October 06, 2017, 11:17:22 AM »
If every other forum on the internet was dead, I still couldn't bring myself to spend any more time at HBT than I do now.

36
Beer Recipes / Re: Recipe critique.
« on: October 06, 2017, 09:34:13 AM »
Yes, if it's 300:100 or 150:50 so4/cl IIRC produce indistinguishable beers.

I think a stout stands up to minerally water very well.  My .02 cents.

Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk



That has not been my experience.  I fond that the absolute values are more important than the ratio.

37
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Where to learn more about yeast
« on: October 05, 2017, 12:37:08 PM »
The best way to learn is to brew the same thing over and over again changing only one thing....like the yeast.

38
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 3522 questions
« on: October 05, 2017, 12:08:07 PM »
Thanks for the input.

Can anyone imagine it ever being "Clean and Malty" like the description says in Brew like a Monk?

I can't imagine it being like that based on everything I've read about it. 

I'm trying to find a yeast that imparts just a slight bit of Belgian character, manly the fruity aspect was
hoping to be able to tweak 3522 with either pitch rate, temp, or maybe aeration to be able to accomplish this.
I tried over pitching and fermenting at 64 and definitely got quite a bit of phenols.

My next thought is WLP510.

I have never gotten what I would describe as "clean and malty".  It's more tart and phenolic.  I run it in the 63-65F range and it's never fruity for me.  Maybe with a higher temp, but I don't want fruity so I've never tried.  I think what you want is WY3787 based on your description.  BTW, 3522 makes a killer Belgo/American IPA.

39
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 3522 questions
« on: October 05, 2017, 08:20:44 AM »
I've used 3522 many times. At ~ 64F I think it gives a nice balance of fruity and spicy character. I haven't used it much warmer than that as I don't like overbearing esters and phenols. I think it's an excellent, well balanced Belgian strain, suitable in most Belgian styles. Never used the WL version. I wouldn't be surprised if there are noticeable differences between the two.

This, except for the last part.  I haven't used the White version, either, but I wouldn't assume there are no differences between the 2.

40
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Water hardness question...
« on: October 04, 2017, 02:29:52 PM »
EDIT:  Denny, the other thing I'm seeing is that the BTB seems to really have some impact on clarity which I understand is one of its benefits.  You know I'm a clear beer freak but between the 'smoother, softer' beer, the better head formation and the clarity, I'm a very happy brewer lately.  :D

Ken, I've only done one side by side with BTB but I saw a real difference.  Now that I'm using it in every batch I really think my beers are clearer and better tasting.  As soon as I have time ot brew more, I want to do more side by sides.  Also, EB will be releasing our results of an aging experiment with BTB soon.

41
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Water hardness question...
« on: October 04, 2017, 01:45:09 PM »
Well, with the large percentage of folks to follow your word without question, I thought that sentence would go a looooooooong way ;).  Pretty big complement to have such a following in the homebrewing world.

Thank you!  To me, it sounded like it should be followed with "and everybody knows he's an idiot!"  ;)

No, no, no.... Pragmatic? Yes. Idiot? Not even remotely!

Thanks again.  Maybe you just don't know me well enough!  ;)

42
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Water hardness question...
« on: October 04, 2017, 12:48:31 PM »
Well, with the large percentage of folks to follow your word without question, I thought that sentence would go a looooooooong way ;).  Pretty big complement to have such a following in the homebrewing world.

Thank you!  To me, it sounded like it should be followed with "and everybody knows he's an idiot!"  ;)

43
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Water hardness question...
« on: October 04, 2017, 10:34:28 AM »
Reading the "Foam" article referenced above, it says
  'Also never use carapils/carafoam as it is actually very foam negative.'

Huh??
I would like more information on this because it runs counter to everything else I have heard.

It's fairly well recognized that cfoam/cpils don't do much for foam, and only minor amounts for body.  There are better ways to improve those aspects in beer besides using grains such as these.  Even denny recognizes the lack of usefulness cpils is thought to have on foam production.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=29980.msg394026#msg394026

As detailed in this article (http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques), if you don't have foam problems, adding foam positive elements won't help.  Of if you have certain foam issues (not that you do), adding foam positive elements won't help.  I long ago concluded from my experience that wheat and carapils do nothing for foam, at least in the ways homebrewers usually think of.  I use carapils to add body if needed.

"even Denny"...heh heh....


44
https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/brew-files-episode-20-winning-feats-strength

The Brew Is Out There!

On this week's episode of the Brew Files, we sit down in the pre-GABF mayhem to talk Pro-Am Competitions with Oleg Shpyrko, winner of the 2017 Romancing the Beer Competition, and Shaun Smith of Camarillo's Institution Ale Company about why Pro-Am's are a thing and what it takes to transform a potent homebrew (a 9.3% abv Imperial Stout with Cocoa, Peppers and Vanilla) into a commercial brew.

Links

Festivus Feats of Strength Recipe: https://www.experimentalbrew.com/recipes/festivus-feats-strength

T'Oaked's Romancing the Beer Competition: http://romancingthebeer.com/

Institution Ales: http://www.institutionales.com/

45
Kegging and Bottling / Re: High Gravity Won't Force Carb
« on: October 04, 2017, 08:46:25 AM »
I don't have any science, but I've seen the idea in some forum thread or other that oils from things like coffee, cocoa, and oats form an oil slick on the surface that prevents carbonation purely through head pressure.

I've seen that, too, and I can't make it make sense.

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