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Messages - denny

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61
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Craftmeister alkaline wash
« on: May 11, 2017, 02:58:52 PM »
Between buckets and kettles, do you use over the other for either, or are they essentially interchangeable?

I generally use the Oxy for fermenters because they don't need as much oomph.  I use the alkaline for my converted keg kettle, or for the corny I use to boil in with my Zymatic.  Heavy grime.

62
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Craftmeister alkaline wash
« on: May 11, 2017, 02:24:41 PM »
How do the two different Craftmeister products compare?

The Oxygen is pretty much like PBW or Oxiclean, but it dissolves better than either.  The alkaline is really strong and works great even with cold water.  In hot water it's amazing.

63
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Craftmeister alkaline wash
« on: May 11, 2017, 02:23:29 PM »
Have you used it on stainless?  I tried the samples I got a NHC but was honestly less than impressed... I feel like I did something wrong.  It wasn't worse than pbw but seemed to have trouble dissolving in lukewarm water and left the same amount of crust on my stainless fermenter.

Yep, many times.  Worked great for me.

64
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Craftmeister alkaline wash
« on: May 11, 2017, 02:22:47 PM »
I use nothing but Craftmeister.  The alkaline cleaner works better with cold water than PBW works with hot water.  Here's a comparison we did, complete with pics...https://www.experimentalbrew.com/blogs/drew/craftmeister-cleaners-picturing-carboy-test .  Not only does it clean better, but it rinses more easily than PBW or Oxiclean.
Denny, Having seen that comparison before, I now have a question for you. Is this how you normally clean your equipment, with just an extended soak, or do you use some kind of agitation or scrubbing? If scrubbing, I'm sure even the most frugal of us could use lees cleaner in a smaller volume of water to get the job done

Depends.  Fermenters I wipe lightly sponge (advantage of buckets!) to get heavy build up off before I fill them with water and let them soak.  The only reason I do that is so all that crap I wipe off isn't floating in the water (icky!).  My kettle will get an overnight soak with the alkaline, then wiped lightly with sponge or paper towels.  But I never do any heavy scrubbing.

65
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Craftmeister alkaline wash
« on: May 11, 2017, 12:59:48 PM »
That stuff is awesome, but I use way less than 1 oz. per gallon.

So do I

66
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydrometer Temperature Accuracy
« on: May 11, 2017, 12:59:08 PM »
A hydrometer can in principle be corrected to any temperature - the problem is that as the temperature differential rises, so does the rate of cooling of the sample. At 110°F it's cooling substantially (and unevenly) as you're trying to take a reading. That's why hot side readings are where refractometers shine.

A separate issue, but one that could explain your readings, is that it isn't really possible to get wort and water mixed homogeneously by hand. The yeast does a really good job of that, but stirring won't cut it.

If it's difficult to get the wort and water mixed, how do you know that your refractometer is measuring an appropriate i.e. properly mixed sample?

He said hot side, which would be before water is added.

67
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Overpitching - Does it matter?
« on: May 11, 2017, 12:08:29 PM »
The acetyl coA idea is based on some very old research. As I understand it, the logic is that actively growing yeast use up the acetyl coA and so leave less for ester production. Therefore, underpitching reduces ester synthesis and overpitching increases it. This obviously  contradicts received wisdom that underpitching raises ester production by stressing yeast.

It's ALL very sketchy. Also worth bearing in mind that many brewers pitch the starter wort, so any excess esters that might be created by the growth phase end up in the beer anyway, yet the same brewers claim the beer is cleaner tasting thanks to the large starter.

In the absence of any persuasive evidence indicating otherwise, I'm inclined to believe that pitching rate doesn't matter.

And my own testing says it does, so we can each do what we want.

68
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Craftmeister alkaline wash
« on: May 11, 2017, 12:07:14 PM »
I use nothing but Craftmeister.  The alkaline cleaner works better with cold water than PBW works with hot water.  Here's a comparison we did, complete with pics...https://www.experimentalbrew.com/blogs/drew/craftmeister-cleaners-picturing-carboy-test .  Not only does it clean better, but it rinses more easily than PBW or Oxiclean.

69
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Overpitching - Does it matter?
« on: May 11, 2017, 07:37:31 AM »
I have a suspicion that pitching rate makes no difference to the flavour of beer. Brulosophy did a pitch rate experiment with lager and found nothing. I think the theory that yeast produce different levels of esters at different cell counts is possibly wrong.

I can guarantee you that my own testing says pitching rate does make a difference.  They did one test with one yeast.  That's a data point, not a conclusion.  And Dr. Clayton Cone of Lallemand would disagree with "I think the theory that yeast produce different levels of esters at different cell counts is possibly wrong."

It doesn't surprise me that yeast manufacturers would claim pitching rate is important, just as mineral water manufacturers say you have to drink 7 glasses of water a day. I've struggled to find any empirical evidence to support the claim though. Can you point to any published papers?

 Braukaiser found no difference:

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Experiment_Pitching_Rate_and_Oxygenation

I'm not saying it's impossible, just that the claim is dubious. What's the proposed mechanism? The idea that yeast are somehow stressed by low cell count is clearly nonsense.

I talked about the mechanism via acetyl co-A.  I'm not enough of a biochemist to tell you more than that. 

70
All Grain Brewing / Re: IPA hopping technique survey/poll?
« on: May 11, 2017, 07:35:14 AM »
Bittering, flameout, and dry hops for me.

I tried hopstand a couple of times but it was difficult to hit my temperatures right which led to inconsistent results. Plus, I am all about shortening my brew session length. I don't brew IPAs that often so I just go with what works for me.

I brew IPA a lot, but I seldom do whirlpool hops.  I didn't seem to get anything I can't get from dry hopping.

71
Thanks for a great podcast... Thoroughly enjoy them all!



Thanks!  Love the pic!

72
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydrometer Temperature Accuracy
« on: May 10, 2017, 03:39:22 PM »
A hydrometer can in principle be corrected to any temperature - the problem is that as the temperature differential rises, so does the rate of cooling of the sample. At 110°F it's cooling substantially (and unevenly) as you're trying to take a reading. That's why hot side readings are where refractometers shine.

A separate issue, but one that could explain your readings, is that it isn't really possible to get wort and water mixed homogeneously by hand. The yeast does a really good job of that, but stirring won't cut it.

Agreed with both.  I'm almost positive your problem is the mixing.

73
The Pub / Re: South African Hops to Only Go To ABInBev Breweries.
« on: May 10, 2017, 01:05:55 PM »
S. African hops are an aberration.  They were initially grown because of the old apartheid embargo.  Hops don't grow naturally in Africa; grow lights are necessary because the day isn't long enough in A. Africa.

Are there any ABInBev beers using S. African hops that are crave worthy?  I doubt it.

What I've always been told is that Budweiser (don't know about others) uses 17 different hop varieties in order to minimize year to year differences in any of them.

74
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Overpitching - Does it matter?
« on: May 10, 2017, 12:57:34 PM »
I have a suspicion that pitching rate makes no difference to the flavour of beer. Brulosophy did a pitch rate experiment with lager and found nothing. I think the theory that yeast produce different levels of esters at different cell counts is possibly wrong.

I can guarantee you that my own testing says pitching rate does make a difference.  They did one test with one yeast.  That's a data point, not a conclusion.  And Dr. Clayton Cone of Lallemand would disagree with "I think the theory that yeast produce different levels of esters at different cell counts is possibly wrong."

75
The Pub / Re: South African Hops to Only Go To ABInBev Breweries.
« on: May 10, 2017, 12:55:28 PM »
They already have an 1800 acre farm in northern Idaho. There are 50,000+ acres in the PNW, so they don't have any control.

One of the big brokers, YCHHops is a Co-op owned by a group of hop farms.

South Africa looks to be a different situation.

Yep.  This news didn't upset me too much.

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