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Messages - denny

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8431
Questions about the forum? / Re: Missing avatars
« on: May 21, 2013, 08:36:00 AM »
 I'm seeing avatars for everyone but Hubie, and he has no broken icon symbol.  This was reported late last week and IT has been looking into it.

8432
Beer Recipes / Re: Amarillo IPA
« on: May 20, 2013, 01:23:01 PM »
I can't believe it but I have to disagree with Denny and Vinnie, I have really enjoyed some single hop beers.

Tastes are subjective.  There's no reason we should necessarily like the same beers.  When I was at Beer Camp, Sierra Nevada had a variety of single hop beers on tap.  I tried them all and found them all boring for my palate.  But there were a lot of other people who loved them.  There is no right or wrong...well, except that I'm right!  ;)

8433
All Grain Brewing / Re: Collecting Cooling Water for Future Brews
« on: May 20, 2013, 01:20:08 PM »
We lose power so many times during most winters that it's become SOP for me to fill a few kegs with water.  We have a well, so no power=no water.

8434
Beer Recipes / Re: Amarillo IPA
« on: May 20, 2013, 10:38:58 AM »
I'll just throw this in, in a recent issue of Zymurgy they have a recipe for testing single hops and the author makes a point to say that Amarillo was not good for the 60 minute addition.

That was a statement of opinion. granted from Vinnie at Russian river but still. Try it. Maybe YOU would like it as a 60 minute addition. I find Columbus to be really oniony but others love it.

The other opinion he stated was that while a single hop beer was great for experimenting, it didn't make a good recipe.  I realize that it's subjective, but I agree with him 100%.

8435
The Pub / Re: Heading my way
« on: May 20, 2013, 09:38:05 AM »
Glad you made it, but I hear more is on the way.  Take care.

8436
Equipment and Software / Re: Those little red cans of Oxygen
« on: May 20, 2013, 09:35:31 AM »
I don't shake, I pour back and forth between buckets until the froth reaches the brim.

Am I mistaken if you froth it up during the aeration stage, those head forming proteins are no longer available when you carbonate and serve the beer?

I could swear I heard that somewhere.  Most likely on the internet, so it must be true  ;)

In theory, that's true.  In practice, I've never found it to be a problem. 

Might have read it here....http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques

8437
Homebrew Clubs / Re: Newbie Here
« on: May 19, 2013, 08:57:25 AM »
so keep my temp in the upper 60's?  ???

What Drew said....54-59F.

8438
Homebrew Clubs / Newbie Here
« on: May 18, 2013, 11:23:44 AM »

Also, when I bought the kit, the guys suggested I get the carboys for a second fermentation. Since I haven't read all my directions yet, I will before I start it up. Im only guessing I let it fermit in the 5 gal bucket for about two weeks then change it over to the carboy. How long do I let it fermit in there until I bottle it up?

Don't worry about transferring it to the secondary.  Let it in the primary for 2-3 weeks then bottle it up.

Not if its a true lager, he'll want to rack it off the yeast when at FG and then lager it in the Carboy:)

I'm betting it doesn't use lager yeast.

8439
General Homebrew Discussion / how much DME to + to increase OG
« on: May 18, 2013, 11:23:11 AM »
DME has about 45 ppg.  Go from there.

8440
Homebrew Clubs / Newbie Here
« on: May 18, 2013, 10:13:52 AM »
But, now knowing I have to keep the temp down to 50-55F, I will need to figure something out before I start it up.

Be aware that the 50-55F is only for fermenting lagers (ie. Pilsner, etc.).  Ales (ie. Pale Ale, Blonde, etc.) only need to be held to the upper 60s

Thankyou.
My First batch will be the Continental Pilsner Kit

A lot of "pilsner" kits come with ale yeast instead of lager yeast.  If that's the case with yours, you'll want to ferment it in the low-mid 60s rather than the 50s.

8441
Equipment and Software / Those little red cans of Oxygen
« on: May 18, 2013, 08:42:35 AM »

Or just stay away from oxygen all together.

By doing what?

I gave up on the PITA of oxygen and use a Mix Stir now.

Amanda, you get today's pragmatism award!  My experience is that a MixStir works as well as an O2 setup.

8442
General Homebrew Discussion / timing a lager D-rest
« on: May 17, 2013, 03:18:51 PM »
good info from everyone. seems like we are all on the same page. it just seemed odd to me to hear people do a d-rest after 2 weeks at 50F...seems all activity would be done and there would be nothing gained from doing a d-rest then (considering a normal lager range around 1.050-055). maybe for bigger beers over 1.060 there would still be fermentation activity near the 2 week mark - i just haven't done a lager that big.

As long as you don't remove the yeast from the beer, it doesn't matter if all activity has ended.  Warming the beer for the d rest will make it active again.

ok good to know. but then whats the difference in doing a d-rest at 80-85% attenuation , vs. 99-100% attenuation ? any benefit of one over the other
If you do it at 80%, the yeast will finish the sugars and be active to reduce the VDKs. The increased activity will help scrub off sulfur. Then you can crash down to cold temps to lager and drop out the haze and yeast. The classic profile has a slow cooling to keep the yeast working, as they will slowly reduce the VDKs at low temperature. 

So you clean it up, blow off sulfur and save time. If you are a homebrewer that brews lagers when the weather allows, saving time in the fermenter is a good thing. Might have to get another freezer someday so I can do lagers in the summer.

awesome info guys -another productive day at the forum.

i feel like i should be paying someone - who should i make  ;Dthe check out to?

Me, of course!  ;)

Done!  seriously, my lagers have improved significantly since my schooling with you - much thanks bud. i also think i would be a very tough judge when it comes to diacetyl - my olfactory senses pick up the slightest trace, and as i've said before, i cant stand it.

Man, that's both a blessing and a curse!  I usually get a slickness on the roof of my mouth before I can taste it.

8443
General Homebrew Discussion / timing a lager D-rest
« on: May 17, 2013, 02:11:03 PM »
good info from everyone. seems like we are all on the same page. it just seemed odd to me to hear people do a d-rest after 2 weeks at 50F...seems all activity would be done and there would be nothing gained from doing a d-rest then (considering a normal lager range around 1.050-055). maybe for bigger beers over 1.060 there would still be fermentation activity near the 2 week mark - i just haven't done a lager that big.

As long as you don't remove the yeast from the beer, it doesn't matter if all activity has ended.  Warming the beer for the d rest will make it active again.

ok good to know. but then whats the difference in doing a d-rest at 80-85% attenuation , vs. 99-100% attenuation ? any benefit of one over the other
If you do it at 80%, the yeast will finish the sugars and be active to reduce the VDKs. The increased activity will help scrub off sulfur. Then you can crash down to cold temps to lager and drop out the haze and yeast. The classic profile has a slow cooling to keep the yeast working, as they will slowly reduce the VDKs at low temperature. 

So you clean it up, blow off sulfur and save time. If you are a homebrewer that brews lagers when the weather allows, saving time in the fermenter is a good thing. Might have to get another freezer someday so I can do lagers in the summer.

awesome info guys -another productive day at the forum.

i feel like i should be paying someone - who should i make  ;Dthe check out to?

Me, of course!  ;)

8444
General Homebrew Discussion / timing a lager D-rest
« on: May 17, 2013, 12:50:33 PM »
good info from everyone. seems like we are all on the same page. it just seemed odd to me to hear people do a d-rest after 2 weeks at 50F...seems all activity would be done and there would be nothing gained from doing a d-rest then (considering a normal lager range around 1.050-055). maybe for bigger beers over 1.060 there would still be fermentation activity near the 2 week mark - i just haven't done a lager that big.

As long as you don't remove the yeast from the beer, it doesn't matter if all activity has ended.  Warming the beer for the d rest will make it active again.

ok good to know. but then whats the difference in doing a d-rest at 80-85% attenuation , vs. 99-100% attenuation ? any benefit of one over the other

In my opinion and experience, no difference and no benefit.  AFAIK, the recommendation to do the rest earlier comes from commercial practices to speed up the process.  Fortunately, we're homebrewers.

8445
General Homebrew Discussion / timing a lager D-rest
« on: May 17, 2013, 11:12:42 AM »
good info from everyone. seems like we are all on the same page. it just seemed odd to me to hear people do a d-rest after 2 weeks at 50F...seems all activity would be done and there would be nothing gained from doing a d-rest then (considering a normal lager range around 1.050-055). maybe for bigger beers over 1.060 there would still be fermentation activity near the 2 week mark - i just haven't done a lager that big.

As long as you don't remove the yeast from the beer, it doesn't matter if all activity has ended.  Warming the beer for the d rest will make it active again.

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