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Messages - brushvalleybrewer

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31
Equipment and Software / Re: Fermwrap Heater
« on: March 15, 2012, 05:11:15 PM »
I wrap the carboy and attach the FermWrap with blue painter's tape. Then I attach the probe under some bubble wrap (with more blue painter's tape) in the blank area where the FermWrap doesn't cover.

32
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Is homebrew craft beer?
« on: March 15, 2012, 04:58:03 PM »
Homebrew… the craftiest of craft beers

Can we get T-shirts made up with this on it?   ;)

33
I really enjoyed it. His two earlier ones are good too.

34
I asked this question and about temperature control jargon generally and got it answered on a July episode of Brew Strong.

Assuming you are “Doug in Texas,” I think I found it. It is the July 25th show. The funny thing is that episode does not show up in the iTunes subscription. I guess that explains why I had not heard it. It starts at 40:32.

35
Interesting responses, everybody. Thanks.

36
I know that fermentation generates heat. I've demonstrated it to myself by measuring the temperature inside and outside an uncontrolled fermentation and seen as much as 8 °F difference. But I have also seen that in my 50 °F cellar, the beer in my carboy never gets above the temperature I have my set on my Johnson controlled FermWrap.

So when I see a recipe say, "Start fermentation at 64 °F and allow to free rise to 69 °F," and I have seen some professional brewers give this advice, what does it mean?

I mean, if the ambient temperature is 64 °F I can imagine one thing happening, but if the ambient temperature is 85 °F, it will be another, and if I control the temperature, well then I'm not exactly letting it free rise, am I?

So, what does it mean?

37
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Poll: Do you use a secondary fermentation
« on: March 01, 2012, 05:53:14 PM »
I only brew ales. I let the beer go through high kräusen, then raise the temperature for a diacetyl rest (secondary fermentation, but in the original fermenter), then cold crash the yeast, transfer to a keg, and dry hop using nylon bags in the keg.

38
General Homebrew Discussion / What's Brewing This Weekend - 2/24 Edition
« on: February 25, 2012, 10:35:28 AM »
I'm brewing an Anonymous American Ale.

39
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: batch sparging
« on: February 23, 2012, 04:30:35 PM »
I let liquid flow out the tun into my boil kettle while continuously adding water. I try to match the rates of flow.
I do this, there is a name for it - it is called fly sparging. ;)

^ This. ::)

40
All Grain Brewing / Re: Go big or go home!!??
« on: February 17, 2012, 06:46:55 PM »

41
The Pub / Re: Happy 60th Birthday Denny!
« on: February 17, 2012, 10:38:57 AM »
Happy Birthday Denny. Thanks for the Batch Sparging! ;D

42
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer apps fpr iPad
« on: February 16, 2012, 09:29:16 AM »
Take a look at BeerAlchemy. No connection, just a happy user. I think it's worth it for the brew day calculators alone.

43
Kegging and Bottling / Re: What's a "volume"?
« on: February 10, 2012, 04:40:18 PM »
I over thought it for a long time. Maybe you are too. It is the common use of the word "volume" meaning an amount of enclosed space. One volume of CO2 in a Corny keg is the amount of volume that will fit in the volume of a Corny keg. The fun thing is that because there is space between molecules, that it really doesn't matter whether there is anything else in the keg - like beer. It still holds the same amount of CO2 at one volume. Now the reason why we use this description of how much gas will fit into a given volume, is that if we have more than normal pressure - say twice, for example - then we can get two volumes into the same keg. So two volumes is the same as saying twice atmospheric pressure. That is easy because it doesn't rely on you knowing what the atmospheric pressure of CO2 is.

44
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Opinion about posting Jamil's recipes
« on: February 08, 2012, 05:11:43 AM »
What does everyone else think?

I am just one person but I think several things.

First, your friend's premise is nearly correct, if slightly flawed in its presentation. According to the U.S. Copyright Office:

Quote
Copyright law does not protect recipes that are mere listings of ingredients. Nor does it protect other mere listings of ingredients such as those found in formulas, compounds, or prescriptions. Copyright protection may, however, extend to substantial literary expression—a description, explanation, or illustration, for example—that accompanies a recipe or formula or to a combination of recipes, as in a cookbook.

Note that Jamil's book and the "substantial literary expression" that accompanies the recipe are protected by copyright, but that the "mere listings of ingredients" is not.

That said, the Brewer's Code says that you shouldn't take food from another brewer's mouth... and here we get into the gray area.

If it were me, I would not claim the recipe as my own — that would be a lie. I might present it in the context of a review of the book and provide links to where the reader could buy the book — that would be fair use. Instead of presenting the recipe myself, I might simply link to Fred Bonjour's site which houses — with permission — many of Jamil's recipes that were available prior to the publishing of Brewing Classic Styles. For those that are not there, or even in addition for those that are, instead of presenting the recipe myself, I might link to the Jamil Show Archives for the episode in question.

All of that said, a recipe is just that barest of starts on a great beer. Equipment, process, technique, and the brewer's skill are what makes a great beer. Jamil can make a better beer with a can of hopped extract than I can make with the best recipe.

(I am not a lawyer.)

[Edited to remove the "presumably" regarding Fred's permission to post the recipes. See his comment.]

45
The Pub / Re: keep my order safe from zombies
« on: February 06, 2012, 04:49:55 AM »
That's awesome!

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