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Messages - bboy9000

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136
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 08:59:40 AM »

I see Jon touched on the last part, but the first part makes me smile. Just wanted to note that.

Let me clarify.  There may be some scientific papers out there but don't seem readily available.  I don't belong to a pro brewing organization and can't afford to shuck out several hundred dollars for pro brewing texts.

137
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 08:54:36 AM »
  The only thing preventing me from going LODO is the inability to under let my grain as I have a single MLT and my kettle doesn't have a ball valve.


I have the same issue (for now). I siphoned the mash water gently into the cooler and ended up with a great beer.

With an auto-siphon?

138
All Grain Brewing / Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 08:42:55 AM »
I think my main obstacle was getting over the "Worrying about HSA is old-school" attitude.  Granted the concern used to be about mash pH, not oxidation of polyphenols.  I'm also still troubled by the lack of scientific papers that show polyphenol oxidation has an effect on beer.  Although it seems accepted in pro brewing that polyphenol oxidation has or may have  a real effect on beer quality. 

The only thing preventing me from going LODO is the inability to under let my grain as I have a single MLT and my kettle doesn't have a ball valve.

139
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 20, 2016, 02:54:44 PM »
Love the mic drop Bryan.  I'll be reading it by this weekend.  Gotta get final grades in and finish moving.  Thanks for the information.

140
All Grain Brewing / Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 20, 2016, 02:52:53 PM »
Bryan forgot to add the statistical analysis that was conducted. 27/30 correct tasters gives a p-value of 1.66e-10. In these circumstances 15 participants would have had to choose the Low Oxygen beer to achieve statistical significance (p < 0.05). The fact that they all preferred the flavor of the beer should be telling as well.
I'm not trying to argue here just want to make a point.  Unless that exact experiment has been repeated multiple times the 27/30 could be an anomaly, correct?  Wouldn't the exact same experiment on the exact same system need to be done repeatedly?  Maybe I'm missing something as its been a while since my last statics class.

This is also an issue with Marshall's XBMTs and Denny and Drew's IGORs.  The experiment is only done once and on different systems.  It won't stop me from reading Brulosophy, Listening to Experimental Brewing or reading GBF.  All of your experiences raise some good questions and are educational even if they don't result in scientific theory.

EDIT:  I realize we (and actual scientists) are not trying to generate scientific theories just reasonable conclusions.

141
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 20, 2016, 02:38:25 PM »
If I presented you with a 400+ page dissertation with gas chromatographic studies at the Weihenstephan, and sensory panel analysis, it wouldn't matter?
I'd love to read that!  That's been my deal this entire time.  Christmas break is coming up so I'll have some time on my hands.

Lab analysis and sensory analysis are equally important.  Most things in brewing can be explained by science (though not everything has yet) but beer is also largely subjective as it deals with human perception (some of which is explainable by science, who know, maybe all of it).

142
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 20, 2016, 02:30:31 PM »
I enjoy the brulosophy experiments, but I find at times the experiment designs are lacking.

This is something that they and we go through all the time...."you didn't do the experiment I would have done".  Take them for what they are.
It's the way it is. Publish these experiments and you will get criticism. Hopefully most is constructive and dialogue is kept open.
That's what happens in professional science research as well.  It's part of peer review.

143
General Homebrew Discussion / Newbie here. Water question.
« on: December 15, 2016, 08:44:49 PM »
+10 for Bru'n Water (I really should support it- thanks Martin).

I get RO water for 33-39 cents per gallon at the water stations in town.  For a 5 gallon batch it adds $3.50-$4.00 per brew.   When you switch to all grain RO or distilled makes it much easier to build the water profile for the beer style you are brewing.

144
Beer Recipes / Re: Chicken Wing Beer
« on: December 14, 2016, 08:04:25 PM »
Maybe a hot pepper saison. Add some of the ranch spices.  Or just rely on the phenols from the Belgian yeast for the spice character.

145
Beer Recipes / Chicken Wing Beer
« on: December 14, 2016, 07:12:32 PM »
That's awesome.  When I started brewing, a maple bacon Porter sounded good.  I just ended up with a salty Porter.

When I saw the thread "Chicken Wing Beer" my first thought was West Coast IPA!  When I have some good hot wings I go for WCIPA or BMC (Bud, Miller, Coors).

To answer your question maybe a pepper beer with ranch dressing seasoning.  I prefer blue cheese with my wings but I'm not sure how one would safely get that flavor into beer.

EDIT:  Note-  ranch seasoning packets may have powdered milk in them I'm not sure.  I'd check first.  Maybe look up the herbs and spices used in ranch dressing and make your own seasoning from scratch.  Make about 1/4 cup.  Add 25% the last few minutes of the boil then a teaspoon at a time in secondary.  Let it sit a day then sample and add more if needed.  I usually don't use secondary except when massively dry hopping.  You may just want to add it to primary.  Also,  if I doesn't taste like Frank's Hot Sauce then it's not Buffalo wings.

146
Yeast and Fermentation / stirring the fermetor
« on: December 12, 2016, 09:48:07 PM »
The ale yeast seam to work hard making that beer and destroying there floating city 72 hrs in seam to me may have some sort of effect on the yeast. I'm over thinking again but without the over thinkers out there where would we be," don't answer that". So I say again, does stiring up the fermentation vessel at the peek of activity harm or change the outcome of the beer.?
Seems like you answered your own question.  I'd leave it alone.  If you don't like the fermentation temperature document your procedure and adjust a variable on the next batch.

147
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Newport Hofbrauhaus
« on: December 10, 2016, 04:07:08 PM »
Mmmm.  Jealous .

148
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: stirring the fermetor
« on: December 10, 2016, 04:06:07 PM »
 I doubt you hurt it.  I wouldn't worry about it getting to 70 in the first place though.  If you don't want the temp that high just make note of it and correct it on the next batch.

149
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 09, 2016, 03:11:28 PM »
Would bottle-carbing be a better idea?

150
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I'm Back!
« on: December 07, 2016, 10:13:29 PM »
Awesome that you went straight for the big beer.  Welcome back to the obsession.

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