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Messages - bboy9000

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31
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How long to let a starter cook?
« on: July 13, 2015, 10:31:38 PM »
You will get differing opinions on this.  I either pitch the whole starter at high krausen or chill the starter at high krausen then decant the beer then pitch.  Search the forum and you will find some extensive threads on this in the past year or so.

32
Equipment and Software / Starting Equipment
« on: July 13, 2015, 10:27:30 PM »
A fermentation bucket is just an alternative to a carboy (EDIT:  that's how I interpreted the reference-  either one can be used for primary or secondary fermentation). They are easier to clean.   

As far as transferring to a "secondary" as most recipe kits recommend I don't do it 99% of the time.  I dry hop in the primary fermentation vessel after primary fermentation is complete.  I only use a secondary vessel for Brett or sour ales.

33
Equipment and Software / Re: Starting Equipment
« on: July 12, 2015, 08:45:35 PM »
The Grainfather looks nice.  I couldn't get all of the info up on my iPhone.  Is it similar to a Picobrew?  As far as the burner/stockpot combo, I don't know if that's a regular price for Bass Pro,  but any sports/outdoor shop (i.e. Cabala's, Galyan's, REI, Gander Mountain, Dick's etc.) should have some deals.  And if you go all-grain on the cheap but for high quality see Denny Conn's website at www.dennybrew.com

Oh and welcome to the forum as well!  The AHA is one the of the best resources with experienced home and pro brewers here to help.

34
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Miller Lite vs. O'Doul's
« on: July 12, 2015, 07:59:11 PM »

Years ago I tried one of those 67 calorie beers, seems like it was a Miller. Basically it was seltzer water with two ounces of beer in it. Id rather have a diet tonic n lime

+gin, right?

35
Kegging and Bottling / Out of ideas
« on: July 12, 2015, 07:05:18 PM »
Not sure what kind of kegs you have, but a couple of mine you have to position the out tube into a dimple in the bottom of the keg, it can turn out of position when you tighten the post and plaster itself against the bottom of the keg, restricting the flow.  It did till I cut those ones off.

Yes the dip tube in the dimple thing.  I forgot until reading this but that happens to me once.  Fixed the problem.  But sounds like you probably solved it with the post issue.

36
Equipment and Software / Re: Starting Equipment
« on: July 12, 2015, 06:54:57 PM »
Wow, you're pretty well prepared.  I'm not sure what a grain father is but if you plan on doing full-size boils for 5.5 gallon batches instead of topping off the carboy with water post boil you need at least an 8 gallon kettle in my experience.  Also, I prefer to have Powdered Brewery Wash (PBW) for cleaning and Star San for sanitizing.  With these you will rarely need a carboy brush, but I'd still have one.  A bottling tree is convenient but not a necessity.  Make sure you have a hydrometer jar.  A wine thief is handy for taking samples for gravity readings.  I really recommend a cheap rope bucket to use as a swamp cooler for maintaining constant fermentation temperatures.  I also prefer a good digital thermometer.  I have one made by CDN.

http://www.cdnw.com/product/proaccurate-thermometer

As far as where to get the equipment I'd shop around.  For brewing-specific equipment I recommend a local homebrew shop.   Stainless steel is nice but I use aluminum kettles.  I found good deals at the local Bass Pro Shop and on Amazon.com.  Unless you have a good stove (or to avoid ruining a good one) I would recommend a burner i.e.  turkey fryer burner.  The local Bass Pro often has burners with 8 gallon stockpots for $70. 

No matter what equipment you use that is not nearly important as sound cleaning and sanitizing, pitching the proper amount of healthy yeast, controlling your fermentation temperature and keeping recipes simple at first.

Welcome to the obsession.

Cheers!

37
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Nasty Off-Flavor
« on: July 11, 2015, 10:00:22 AM »

Yeah, I'll definitely scrub these. Might even let them soak in a bleach solution for a while.

Slightly off topic for a moment- isn't Star San better than bleach?  I thought I heard or read that Star San needs a minute of contact time to sanitize and bleach needed 20 minutes.

38
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Sour
« on: July 10, 2015, 08:52:04 PM »
+1 to Jim's recommendation on the three sip rule.  My first sour was Monk's Cafe.  On my first sip I thought I had some old milk.  By sip three or four it was a nice tart cherry flavor.

In addition to Monk's Cafe and Rodenbach I recommend Boon Kriek as a good entry level sour.  There's the whole line of Lindeman's but it's like the college girl sweet wine version of Lambic.  It's not really Lambic.

39
Equipment and Software / Re: 1/6 Bbl kegs for homebrewing
« on: July 10, 2015, 02:00:38 PM »

Can I swear on this  forum?
You can on the Brewing Network forum.  Come on over!

40
All Grain Brewing / Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 01:49:32 PM »
I understand that but with descriptions such  as bitter/harsh we immediately thought of mash pH due to roasted grains.  Water chemistry can change seasonally as well.  If you believe over-attenuation is a problem have you tried using different yeasts?

I mostly used harsh/bitter by way of saying the beer was too dry and the roasted-ness stuck out too much. Instead of having some sweetness to balance that out.

What I'm saying is everything I'm making with this mash regimen is attenuating well above what I'm expecting. French Saison, Belgian Ardennes, Witbier, Whitbread, etc...

Okay.  You probably have the right idea with a shorter mash time.  Although those yeasts you mentioned are all beasts.  Ok, I haven't tried the witbier or whitbread yeast but I always 85-90%+ attenuation with the saison and Belgian Ardennes.  Maybe try wlp 002, Wy 1099 or Danstar Windsor.  Windsor is really known for being a low attenuator.

41
All Grain Brewing / Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 01:11:00 PM »
What I'm really after here is fixing the over-attenuation problem.

I understand that but with descriptions such  as bitter/harsh we immediately thought of mash pH due to roasted grains.  Water chemistry can change seasonally as well.  If you believe over-attenuation is a problem have you tried using different yeasts?

42
All Grain Brewing / Re: Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 12:58:18 PM »

In my experience I've had harsh stouts probably due to too fine a crush and too low mash pH.  I changed both at the same time so I'm not sure which variable made the difference.

FWIW I fixed my harsh stout problem by raising pH. Kept crush the same - made a huge difference.
Yes, too low a pH (higher acidity) will lead to a different harshness.  That's why water chemisty is your friend.  There is no water that's universally good for brewing.  Certain waters will brew certain styles better, so you have to work around it brewing a different style.

Yes, I learned my water is pretty good for   APA.  For everything  else I use Bru'n Water.

43
All Grain Brewing / Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 12:55:23 PM »
In my experience I've had harsh stouts probably due to too fine a crush and too low mash pH.  I changed both at the same time so I'm not sure which variable made the difference.

FWIW I fixed my harsh stout problem by raising pH. Kept crush the same - made a huge difference.

Yes, I raised my mash pH with mineral additions.  In my case the the low pH may have been caused by the powder-like crush Jamil recommends for the roasted grains in his dry stout recipe.  I won't do that again.

44
All Grain Brewing / Re: Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 12:34:13 PM »
In my experience I've had harsh stouts probably due to too fine a crush and too low mash pH.  I changed both at the same time so I'm not sure which variable made the difference.

45
Events / Re: NHC 2016 Location
« on: July 09, 2015, 10:51:38 PM »

With the recent riots, soaring crime/murder rate, Baltimore has zero appeal for me to come visit. I'll sit this one out.

I doubt it's as bad as you think.  I travel to St. Louis frequently (right next to Baltimore in crime) and I've never felt unsafe.

BTW, St. Louis has Schlafly, Urban Chestnut, Perennial and Side Project amongst many more.  Being from KC I hate to admit STL is a great place for NHC, but if the AHA doesn't want to chose an historic brewing capitol (no, not just A-B) then I guess that just leaves more Side Project for us Midwesterners.

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