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Messages - bboy9000

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31
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Sour
« on: July 10, 2015, 08:52:04 PM »
+1 to Jim's recommendation on the three sip rule.  My first sour was Monk's Cafe.  On my first sip I thought I had some old milk.  By sip three or four it was a nice tart cherry flavor.

In addition to Monk's Cafe and Rodenbach I recommend Boon Kriek as a good entry level sour.  There's the whole line of Lindeman's but it's like the college girl sweet wine version of Lambic.  It's not really Lambic.

32
Equipment and Software / Re: 1/6 Bbl kegs for homebrewing
« on: July 10, 2015, 02:00:38 PM »

Can I swear on this  forum?
You can on the Brewing Network forum.  Come on over!

33
All Grain Brewing / Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 01:49:32 PM »
I understand that but with descriptions such  as bitter/harsh we immediately thought of mash pH due to roasted grains.  Water chemistry can change seasonally as well.  If you believe over-attenuation is a problem have you tried using different yeasts?

I mostly used harsh/bitter by way of saying the beer was too dry and the roasted-ness stuck out too much. Instead of having some sweetness to balance that out.

What I'm saying is everything I'm making with this mash regimen is attenuating well above what I'm expecting. French Saison, Belgian Ardennes, Witbier, Whitbread, etc...

Okay.  You probably have the right idea with a shorter mash time.  Although those yeasts you mentioned are all beasts.  Ok, I haven't tried the witbier or whitbread yeast but I always 85-90%+ attenuation with the saison and Belgian Ardennes.  Maybe try wlp 002, Wy 1099 or Danstar Windsor.  Windsor is really known for being a low attenuator.

34
All Grain Brewing / Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 01:11:00 PM »
What I'm really after here is fixing the over-attenuation problem.

I understand that but with descriptions such  as bitter/harsh we immediately thought of mash pH due to roasted grains.  Water chemistry can change seasonally as well.  If you believe over-attenuation is a problem have you tried using different yeasts?

35
All Grain Brewing / Re: Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 12:58:18 PM »

In my experience I've had harsh stouts probably due to too fine a crush and too low mash pH.  I changed both at the same time so I'm not sure which variable made the difference.

FWIW I fixed my harsh stout problem by raising pH. Kept crush the same - made a huge difference.
Yes, too low a pH (higher acidity) will lead to a different harshness.  That's why water chemisty is your friend.  There is no water that's universally good for brewing.  Certain waters will brew certain styles better, so you have to work around it brewing a different style.

Yes, I learned my water is pretty good for   APA.  For everything  else I use Bru'n Water.

36
All Grain Brewing / Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 12:55:23 PM »
In my experience I've had harsh stouts probably due to too fine a crush and too low mash pH.  I changed both at the same time so I'm not sure which variable made the difference.

FWIW I fixed my harsh stout problem by raising pH. Kept crush the same - made a huge difference.

Yes, I raised my mash pH with mineral additions.  In my case the the low pH may have been caused by the powder-like crush Jamil recommends for the roasted grains in his dry stout recipe.  I won't do that again.

37
All Grain Brewing / Re: Over-attenuation in BIAB
« on: July 10, 2015, 12:34:13 PM »
In my experience I've had harsh stouts probably due to too fine a crush and too low mash pH.  I changed both at the same time so I'm not sure which variable made the difference.

38
Events / Re: NHC 2016 Location
« on: July 09, 2015, 10:51:38 PM »

With the recent riots, soaring crime/murder rate, Baltimore has zero appeal for me to come visit. I'll sit this one out.

I doubt it's as bad as you think.  I travel to St. Louis frequently (right next to Baltimore in crime) and I've never felt unsafe.

BTW, St. Louis has Schlafly, Urban Chestnut, Perennial and Side Project amongst many more.  Being from KC I hate to admit STL is a great place for NHC, but if the AHA doesn't want to chose an historic brewing capitol (no, not just A-B) then I guess that just leaves more Side Project for us Midwesterners.

39
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brew day visitor
« on: July 09, 2015, 07:57:00 PM »
Ba dap ching!

40
Beer Recipes / malt character for pale ale
« on: July 09, 2015, 03:46:41 PM »
Point taken. Your Alt comparison is a good one as I can relate to it.

I've never had authentic examples of Alt but I doubt the Germans are using Simcoe, Amarillo and Cascade.  Those varieties combined with late additions allow me to get hops character through even with the caramel character.

I agree with the approach on AIPA.  I use 90%  2-Row and 10% C-20.

41
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Trippin' about my dry hopped IPA
« on: July 09, 2015, 01:37:35 PM »
I agree with everything that's been said, but I add my hop pellets directly to the primary without using a sack.  All-grain can be cheaper as long as you don't go crazy with fancy equipment.  My first mash tun cost me $6.  A friend found a 10 gallon Igloo cooler at a flea market for $1 and I spent $5 on a plastic ball valve and made my own false bottom with cheap plumbing supplies.  I've since "upgraded" to a SS bulkhead/ball valve and bazooka screen but I figure after brewing a few times a month the cost has spread out.  Also,  I look at it as a hobby, not necessarily a way  to save money.  If you want to go all grain on the cheap refer to Denny Conn's website www.dennybrew.com and try to find a cooler at garage sales, flea markets, Craigslist, etc.

Oh, and to respond to the employee at the LHBS, yes you can make better wort than the brewers that make the malt extracts.

42
Beer Recipes / Re: malt character for pale ale
« on: July 09, 2015, 01:23:40 PM »

I don't consider 2 base malts and 1 crystal malt to be a very complex malt bill.
I don't either, but it does add complexity flavor-wise which I like in a pale ale.

43
Equipment and Software / Re: New Mash Tun
« on: July 09, 2015, 01:20:59 PM »

Tried that exact setup in my 70 qt. Coleman Extreme and found that it didn't drain as well as with my Cheap'n'Easy setup.
Wonder why.  If I leave more than a cup of liquid in the tun, it's because I choose to.  Maybe the altitude.  ;)

Yeah, that's GOT to be it!  ;)

Mine is actually in a 10 gallon Igloo water cooler but with the bazooka screen and SS bulkhead.  I never have issues lautering and sparging.  I've never needed rice hulls even with 60% wheat.

44
Beer Recipes / Re: malt character for pale ale
« on: July 09, 2015, 11:56:58 AM »

Those bills are too malt focused to enable the hops to exhibit. I would knock the munich and crystal down appreciably to leave a malt flavor that is more 'singular '.

I would still keep my bill at least 85% base malt.  With some hop bursting I can get some caramel character with the hops in an APA. 

45
Equipment and Software / New Mash Tun
« on: July 09, 2015, 11:51:31 AM »
Bulkhead and fitting in a Coleman Xtreme work exceedingly well for me (with a bazooka instead of a braid).

+1.  Love that combo.

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