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Messages - bboy9000

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76
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I like the Brewing Network, but....
« on: June 23, 2015, 12:49:03 PM »
1.  This just seems like sour grapes.
2.  Relax, it's not that big of a deal.
3.  If it is that big of a deal then RDWHAHB.
4.  If it is that big of a deal write the Governing Committee.
5.  It really isn't a big deal.
6.  Haters gonna hate. 

I'm proud to call the BN my club but like Jim, I say it kind of tongue-in-cheek.  That said, I'm probably a little biased.  Reading this thread has really been a bummer.  At first it really wrecked my worldview of the homebrewing culture/community then I realized letting some sore losers that boo people affect my view of the homebrewing community is just as silly as letting some bigots standing in line at BNA 10 affect my. view of the BN.  The BN has been one of the biggest factors in improving my brewing skills.  The AHA Forum and the awesome people on here is the other.  While this thread  has been "civil" there is an undercurrent of anti-BN sentiment.  If it really makes some one so unhappy then write the Governing Committee.  Otherwise let's argue about the quality of dry vs. liquid yeast (liquid is better) or whether or not to cold crash a starter or pitch at high Krausen.

77
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I like the Brewing Network, but....
« on: June 23, 2015, 12:29:36 PM »

They are having a discussion about this over on the BN forums:
http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=297796#p297796

Someone from QUAFF even discusses that they would be the obvious winner if the BN were to disband, but the best comment IMHO is the person who states that the BN should not change anything as it the AHA's issue, not their's, which I wholeheartedly agree with. I'm still puzzled on how the BN separates the business from the club as I still don't think they have defined that line. Not that they have to, but since Justin seems to want to emphasize a separation between the 2, then I am curious how they go about doing that.

Other than the use of the BN forum as a rally point I wasn't aware the BN business had any involvement in the organization of participants in competitions.

It doesn't.

78
Equipment and Software / Re: Thermapen Sale
« on: April 17, 2015, 06:29:51 PM »
I posted this in another thread.  Only $20 and reads in 6 seconds.  I'm on my second only because I set my first in an open flame.  I verified the second was calibrated out of the box just like the first.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=22271

79
Beer Recipes / Re: new Pale Ale
« on: April 13, 2015, 09:23:45 PM »

I hear ya, but sometimes you're surprized. I'm learning that complex recipe doesnt always come out complex in the glass.
+1 Brewing on the Ones.

80
Yeast and Fermentation / Belgian Pale Ale
« on: April 13, 2015, 08:34:04 PM »
Wyeast 3522 (Ardennes) is is my go-to Belgian ale yeast.  I've used it in blond, pale and Belgian Dark Strong.  It had a slight clove flavor in a blond fermented at it just under 70F but a more mellow flavor that complements the malt in a Belgian pale and BDS.  I keep it around 67F and don't care if it gets in the low 70's.  The stuff takes of like a rocket and attenuates well.

81
Beer Recipes / Re: APA - what makes it great
« on: April 06, 2015, 09:29:34 PM »
One of my other favorite APA's is Cardinal APA fro Nebraska Brewing.  It's a newer, aggressively late hopped ale with solid malt as well.  It's won awards as an American and English Pale.  This is one case where style guidelines suck.  Honestly as long as it tastes good, who cares?  I know that doesn't help the OP.  One might assume judges would be looking for that classic SN pale ale profile as it is the first example in the style guidelines but I doubt that is actually the case.

82
Beer Recipes / Re: APA - what makes it great
« on: April 05, 2015, 07:22:43 PM »

I agree the symphony metaphor is a good one as APA is generally balanced.  The style is really variable.  I classify APA as classic, or old school, and new school.  In the classic/old school category are beers such as Sierra Nevada, Boulevard  and Boston Lager (I know it's a lager).  In the new school category are Dale's Pale Ale, Odell 5 Barrel and Great Divide Denver Pale Ale.  The new APA has more hop aroma and flavor but has the malt to back it up so it is still balanced.  I also see some similarity to an amber ale as the three I mentioned as new school have some slight caramel character.

My favorite APA recipe is based off one from Basic Brewing Video.    I use 90% 2-Row and 10% C-60.  It is all late hopped with 2oz. each of Simcoe, Amarillo and Cascade at 15, 5 and flameout respectively.  I've made this beer about 6 times and love it.  I may try swapping some Munich for the 2-Row at some point.  I usually ferment it with Chico but used Pacman a few weeks ago and it subdued the hop flavor.  It came out tasting more like SN than the more assertive pale ale I prefer.  I will always use Chico on it in the future.

Edit:  I just looked on the Odell and Great Divide websites and those have won awards as English Pales.  DPA is even labeled as such.  I don't get it at all. I get more hop aroma from those than I do many other APAs.  This style is confusing.

Don't wanna be a dick but denver pale ale is actually an English style pale ale. I wouldn't consider it a new school variety at all considering it has won medals at gabf as English style...

Too late- I already caught that and noted it.  I was thinking of it as an APA because I get more hop aroma from it than SN and Boulevard.

83
Beer Recipes / Re: APA - what makes it great
« on: April 05, 2015, 06:44:30 PM »

Where do Victory, Biscuit, and Special Roast fit in? Style guidelines say small amounts are appropriate in APA's and don't mention these malts in Amber Ales. But more often than not I get toasty and roasty flavors in commercial Ambers and not so often in APAs.

I can't imagine putting those in an APA that I'd like to drink.  I don't like a toasty flavor in APA.

84
Beer Recipes / APA - what makes it great
« on: April 05, 2015, 06:39:20 PM »
I agree the symphony metaphor is a good one as APA is generally balanced.  The style is really variable.  I classify APA as classic, or old school, and new school.  In the classic/old school category are beers such as Sierra Nevada, Boulevard  and Boston Lager (I know it's a lager).  In the new school category are Dale's Pale Ale, Odell 5 Barrel and Great Divide Denver Pale Ale.  The new APA has more hop aroma and flavor but has the malt to back it up so it is still balanced.  I also see some similarity to an amber ale as the three I mentioned as new school have some slight caramel character.

My favorite APA recipe is based off one from Basic Brewing Video.    I use 90% 2-Row and 10% C-60.  It is all late hopped with 2oz. each of Simcoe, Amarillo and Cascade at 15, 5 and flameout respectively.  I've made this beer about 6 times and love it.  I may try swapping some Munich for the 2-Row at some point.  I usually ferment it with Chico but used Pacman a few weeks ago and it subdued the hop flavor.  It came out tasting more like SN than the more assertive pale ale I prefer.  I will always use Chico on it in the future.

Edit:  I just looked on the Odell and Great Divide websites and those have won awards as English Pales.  DPA is even labeled as such.  I don't get it at all. I get more hop aroma from those than I do many other APAs.  This style is confusing.

85
Yeast and Fermentation / Secondary question
« on: April 03, 2015, 06:38:10 PM »
Good questions, here's a list as I've had a few:

1.  You do not need to pitch more yeast if you rack to secondary before bottling (assuming primary fermentation is finished, you don't transfer too early and the yeast aren't pooped out from fermenting  a high OG wort).  Edit: From what I understand you will transfer plenty of yeast still in suspension and will likely rouse a little from the yeast cake.

2.  You can just pitch the brett into the primary.

Now my advice.  Do not move beer into a secondary fermentation vessel as a standard practice unless you like the risk of oxidation which makes the beer taste like cardboard (Mmmmm).  I only rack to secondary for very specific reasons: 1) I need to empty a large carboy/bucket to ferment another beer, 2) I'm making a spice beer or a massively dry hopped beer and want to reduce the amount of trub that will eventually  be packaged, 3) I'm pitching brett or bugs that will be in there for six months or longer and 4) lagering, in which case I transfer from the primary fermentation vessel and lager in the keg.  In general, racking to a secondary fermentation vessel is an old school and unnecessary practice.  I even dry hop in the primary. 

If you do decide to transfer to a secondary fermentation vessel remember two things: 1) dont transfer from primary until the yeast are done, usually after 2-4 weeks but only a consistent hydrometer reading for at least three consecutive days can confirm this and 2) try to transfer in an oxygen-free environment by purging the fermentation vessels and siphon of oxygen with carbon dioxide before hand.  IME, you typically won't need to add more yeast to any beer if it's fermented properly.  Sometimes it is necessary if the yeast are tired from doing a high gravity beer or if you are bottle carbonating a lager.

86
Beer Travel / Re: Kansas City
« on: April 01, 2015, 12:48:01 PM »
Welcome in advance to Kansas City!  In case you aren't aware the Missouri side is the biggest part of Kansas City.  If hitting up breweries is your goal then Boulevard, KC Bier Company, Martin City Brewing and Cinder Block Brewing are musts.  If you go to Cinder Block you might as well go to Big Rip as its just five minutes away. 

Since Boulevard restructured the way they do tours it's actually fairly easy to get in, especially on weekdays.  They have three types of tours, the free tour and two levels of paid tours.  With the free tour you get three complimentary sample beers and AHA members also get a free pint and 10% off merchandise.  You still need to get there early in the morning (9 or 10 I believe) when ticket vouchers are available, but you can get the vouchers for a later tour and come back when it's time.   If you've seen enough breweries you can just go to the Boulevard tasting room to drink and stare at the brew system through a window.  KC Beir Co, in the Waldo neighborhood of KCMO, specializes in traditional German ales and lagers.  Their Weizenbock is as good or better than Weihenstephaner Vitus IMHO.  As far a locally owned brew pubs there's McCoy's Public House in Westport and 75th Street Brewery in Waldo.  They both make great beer and pub food but I give McCoy's a slight edge for their Pot Roast and Mac N' Cheese.
  As far as beer bars I'll skip the chains and only mention local places.  In Westport there's The Foundry, Beer Kitchen, The Riot Room, Green Room (also a nano-brewery) and The Local Pig (formerly Bridger's Bottle Shop).  On the Kansas side out in the burbs there's Barley's Brewhaus and The Blue Moose.

I highly recommend seeing the Royals as they are an exciting baseball team and play in what many consider one of the nicest stadiums in baseball.  There's also a Drury Inn across the street which has three complimentary adult beverages from 4-7PM.
     
I'd stay away from The Legends in KCK unless pro soccer or NASCAR is on your to-do list.  While it has great restaurants as the previous poster mentioned, it's just like any other suburban shopping district in the US.  To get a true sense of Kansas City I'd stick to the following neighborhoods/areas (north to south):  The River Market, Downtown/Power & Light District, The Crossroads Art District, The Freight District, Midtown, Westport, Brookside and Waldo.  Also, KC North if you hit up Cinder Block and Big Rip and SOuth KC for Martin City Brewing Co.  As far as where to stay I'd stay in downtown KCMO or on the Plaza.  There's also hotels in Westport but that's a late-night bar area so that may not be good if you like go to bed early.
     
The best BBQ is hotly debated but according to Anthony Bourdain Joe's is one of the 13 places you must eat before you die.  He said it's "the best barbeque in Kansas City which means it's the best barbeque in the universe."  Jack Stack, Rosedale, Danny Edwards, RJ's and Q39 are also great places to eat.  Gate's and Bryant's are okay but they're the stereotypical sauce-covered KC BBQ.  Good non-barbeque upscale casual restaurants are Blue Stem, Cafe Europa, Plaza III (best steaks and good happy hour), Webster House (great happy hour) Le Fou Frog (French), Lidia's (Italian), and Micahel Smith (fine dining).  More casual are Ponak's, Rudy's and Manny's (all Mexican), Jazz Louisiana Kitchen, Po's, Lulu's and Blue Koi (those three are noodles), and You Say Tomato (breakfast brunch). 

You also need to visit the Jazz Museum and the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum.  Both are next door to each other and a few blocks away from Arthur Bryant's Barbeque in the historic Jazz District.  The World War I Museum across from Crown Center is also an awesome museum.

I hope that helps! Enjoy your visit to Kansas City!

87
The Pub / Re: Beer near Lakewood, CO
« on: March 18, 2015, 09:17:00 PM »
Well we only had a day to some sight seeing so we spent an hour at Red Rocks which was a 10 minute drive from where we were staying then went to Idaho Springs to Tommy Knocker Brewery. The Pilsner was fantastic.  Too bad they don't package it.  All of the beer was good although maple beer isn't my thing (yet it's basically the only one they distribute to KC).  The food was good too.  I had elk for the first time and it was delicious.  I wish I could have done more breweries but time was limited.  Thanks for the suggestions.  I will keep them in mind the next time I go to Denver.

88
Commercial Beer Reviews / Orval - disappointed
« on: March 13, 2015, 11:33:08 PM »
And try some of the lighter ones like Boulevard Saison Brett or Goose Island Matilda in the meantime.

Boulevard Saison Brett isn't light after 6 months.  If you like barnyard lay some of it down for a while.

89
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Beer won't Come out of Keg :-(
« on: March 13, 2015, 11:16:28 PM »

I had this happen to me as well, in my case it was a dip tube clogged with hops

That's the only time I had that happen.  It was dribble and foam.  Too much hops in an IPA... Uh wait.  You know what I mean.  Clogged the dip tube and liquid out post.

90
The Pub / Re: Beer near Lakewood, CO
« on: March 13, 2015, 11:13:14 PM »
I asked the groom after the rehearsal.  Apparently I'm staying in the foothills which means I'm near Red Rocks and not far from Tommy Knocker Brewery so I think I found my answer.

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