Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - mihalybaci

Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 ... 11
61
Beer Recipes / Re: First Barleywine
« on: October 01, 2012, 04:17:18 PM »
Also, I'd personally keep it in secondary for longer...but that's just me (some of my barleywines/Burton ales have stayed in secondary for a year).   I just find that it results in (to me) a better brew and lessens the likelihood of  foamouts or bottle bombs for those bottles that make it to the two year mark (or longer)...and it's those bottles that will be the best tasting, hands down.  You will wish you had made more or, at the very least, you'll wish that you had saved more.  Trust me on this. 8)

So there's a difference between bulk ageing and bottle ageing? Say you made two batches of barleywine and bottled one after one month and bottled the other after 10 months, then tasted both after one year total conditioning time (carboy+bottle), do you think there would be a big difference?

62
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First German Dark Beer
« on: September 28, 2012, 06:40:58 PM »
I know White Labs has a few different ale yeasts that they claim have a "lager-like" character (the East Coast Ale yeast comes to mind). Maybe you could try one of those and just ferment as cool as you can. I think their Oktoberfest lager yeast has gives a fermentation range up to near 60F. I'm sure it wouldn't be as clean, but I've often thought of trying that since I don't have a fermentation chiller either.

On a related note, I was trying to cool one of my carboys down and I wrapped it in a soaking wet towel with a box fan on it. The room temp was ~62F and in about 5 minutes with the fan on the outside of the carboy was reading 52F with my infrared thermometer. Though you'd have to keep the towel wet 24/7...

63
I recently found a nearly full case of Duvel that I bought 3 years ago and forgot about.  It had remained in great shape and maybe even improved a bit.

I'm not sure my brew is up to Duvel standards, but that's good to know. I'll try to make it last.

Also, nice work on the meme {:>)

64
General Homebrew Discussion / Golden Strong Ales - Do they age gracefully?
« on: September 28, 2012, 07:53:19 AM »
I brewed up a Belgian Golden strong (OG - 1.085, est. ABV - 10%, 30 IBU). I know that strong beers age better than weak beers and darker beers age better than paler beers. How will my pale strong beer age? Will I be enjoying a better beer in late April or should it all be drunk by January 1st? Right now the beer is on day 13 in the primary and its finally starting to slow down, hopefully I will be bottling next Wednesday/Thursday.

65
The Pub / Re: song title game
« on: September 27, 2012, 12:09:22 PM »
Meet Me in the Morning - Bob Dylan

66
The Pub / Re: Finding a city
« on: September 26, 2012, 01:09:05 PM »
Have you ever been to Denver?

Nope. But I've been to Colorado Springs. LOVED it there (I was undecided between the AFA and Loyola) for the week that we stayed back in '99.

I've lived in Fort Collins, CO (~1 hour north of Denver) for 4 years now and its nice, but I'm ready to leave. So fair warning, the weather is nice (most of the time) but it's a double-edged sword. Every year I've been out here its gotten hotter (I think total we had close to 3 weeks of temps over 95F this summer) and drier (0.27" of rain in August). My hops were going gang busters in May, but then summer hit and they nearly died even watering twice a week. So basically there are two seasons, winter and summer. Winter when its cold and snows, then it moves right into summer where it temps hit the mid-80s early and stay there, with no rain, then fall lasts about 2-3 weeks before getting cold again.

 I can't wait to move back east.

67
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: September 25, 2012, 10:05:03 AM »
Based on my own experience and what I've read from many others, the pH stabilizer is ineffective and add a strange taste to your beer due to the amount of sodium in it.  I don't think citirc acid would be effective because you;d have to add so much it might affect the flavor.  I use either lactic or phosphoric acid to lower pH.  You can also use sauermalt (Yeah, I probably dickchimped the spelling) to lower pH.  But you'll have to have a way of measuring pH to know how much to use and if it's effective.

Okay. I did a saison last year with a pound of acid malt for some tartness, not to lower the pH, and didn't notice any harshness, or at least I can't remember any. I'll definitely try adding some in my next beer and see what happens. Thanks!

68
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: September 25, 2012, 09:00:33 AM »
I have not. If the mash pH is too high, would it be enough for me to drop it with some citric acid (which I have lying around for other purposes)? Or would something like a pH stabilizer that I've seen at the homebrew store be better?

69
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: September 25, 2012, 08:40:28 AM »
I've noticed that some of my lightly hopped beers (20-40 IBU) a slight harshness to the bitterness. I use straight tap water (no treatment at all) and just do 60 min boils for all my bittering additions. Based on the water report, is it likely to be from the water or something in my brewing procedure? Are there any water adjustments I should be making to most of my brews? I know these questions are recipe dependent, but some general guidelines would be fabulous. Thanks for any help.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Tap water for Fort Collins, Colorado

pH 7.9 (measured closer to 7 from my faucet)
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 76
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.13
Cations / Anions, me/L 1.2 / 1.1

(ppm)
Sodium, Na 3
Potassium, K < 1
Calcium, Ca 17
Magnesium, Mg 2
Total Hardness, CaCO3 51
Nitrate, NO3-N 0.1 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S 4
Chloride, Cl 3
Carbonate, CO3 < 1
Bicarbonate, HCO3 44
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 36
Total Phosphorus, P 0.94
Total Iron, Fe < 0.01

70
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Welcoming the new year
« on: September 24, 2012, 08:31:23 AM »
If it were me, I'd definitely make something that I could enjoy during subsequent New Year's Eve parties. Maybe a nice big English-style barleywine, and if you felt the urge you could split it with a bitter. On the other hand, I've never second-guessed myself after brewing something Belgian.

71
The Pub / Re: song title game
« on: September 21, 2012, 07:01:39 AM »
Laze Jane Line Painter - Belle & Sebastian

72
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cramming for a BJCP Tasting Exam
« on: September 20, 2012, 05:51:59 PM »
Also, I know for me "cramming" doesn't work for any test. I just can't process any more info after awhile.  So if it were me, I would make sure to go maybe 30 - 45 minutes a day for the next 10 rather than try to study for 2 hours at a time on any day.

73
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cramming for a BJCP Tasting Exam
« on: September 20, 2012, 03:09:23 PM »
There is a lot of good stuff on the BJCP website in the exam center section. I would download all the PDFs under the heading "Studying for the Beer Judge Exam", and read all of them at least once. Then you can just go back study the one's where you may be deficient. Once you've done that it's the fun part, practice. I don't always trust online beer reviews (e.g. Beer Advocate), but I think it's useful to buy a beer, fill out a full BJCP/AHA scoresheet, and compare your thoughts to other reviews to see if you can pick up the same flavors/aromas.

74
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 100% Brettanomyces (or similar) fermentation
« on: September 20, 2012, 07:20:58 AM »
Do you need to make a starter with a 100% brett beer?

Yep - most sources recommend lager pitching rates.

I've read (mostly on other posts in this forum) that Brett produces the most "funk" under stressful conditions. So if the purpose of all Brett beer is to really experience Brett's full character, wouldn't it be better to under pitch, at least slightly, to encourage ester production?

If you want funk, just pitch brett in a mixed fermentation.

When used in primary fermentation, brett needs to be treated as you would sacch. or it won't attenuate. Adequate pitching, aeration, temp. control.

Per C. Yakobson's paper, increasing acidity of the wort will yield more flavor compounds from the brett, but it may not be the funky flavors you're expecting - more along the lines of esters and phenols produced with belgian strains.

Huh, that's interesting. I know 'Wild Brews' says that Brett is only "super-attenuative" in the presence of other yeasts/bacteria, but I figured that it would produce a similar character regardless. Good info.

75
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 100% Brettanomyces (or similar) fermentation
« on: September 19, 2012, 01:18:20 PM »
Do you need to make a starter with a 100% brett beer?

Yep - most sources recommend lager pitching rates.

I've read (mostly on other posts in this forum) that Brett produces the most "funk" under stressful conditions. So if the purpose of all Brett beer is to really experience Brett's full character, wouldn't it be better to under pitch, at least slightly, to encourage ester production?

Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 ... 11