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Messages - yso191

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91
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Matching IBUs with different AA hops
« on: March 26, 2016, 09:42:26 AM »
I'm definitely on board with Denny and Dave here. Try bittering a given beer to about 40-45 IBUs with any noble hop, then try, say, chinook to the same 40-45 IBUs. I absolutely guarantee the difference will be very noticeable.

But is the difference in bitterness or in what is typically described as flavor?  For example if I bitter with Amarillo with no late additions or dry hopping, will I get citrus/tangerine in the final product?  I doubt it. 

My guess is that the different bittering hops just present different bittering flavors - different alpha acid makeup - but I seriously doubt any noticeable oils remain after a 60 minute boil.  For me to be convinced it would take a lab evaluation.

92
The Pub / St. Augustine, FL
« on: March 21, 2016, 10:41:05 AM »
Drinking a beer from America's oldest brewery (Yuengling) in America's oldest city.  The beer is good, the town is great.

93
Beer Travel / Re: Florida
« on: March 18, 2016, 02:23:53 PM »
Playalinda Brewing is in Titusville and the brewer there, Ron Raike, is in my opinion the best brewer in Florida.  When he was a homebrewer he won Southeast brewer of the year at least three times.  Several years after he stopped homebrewing (he brewed for Shipyard), he could still pull best of show winners out of his closet.
So go there.
And tell him I said hello.

Just left there.  Seriously good beer.  Creative too.  Going back before we leave.

94
The Pub / Re: Drew's Weight Loss
« on: March 18, 2016, 08:48:21 AM »
Just so long as I don't have to eat only Subway sandwiches.  We all know What bizarre effects that has on sexual proclivities

95
 For the price I would go with a spiedel.  I have one and if used it quite a bit and really like it. However I've had to conical stainless fermenters.  My current one is a Chronical 7 gallon.   I love it.  Easy to clean, can transfer under CO2 pressure. It's just a very well-designed unit

96
Ingredients / Re: Red X IIPA
« on: March 16, 2016, 10:32:14 AM »
Looks nice anyway. Nice shade.

I agree completely!  And if the flavor profile is right on this go-around, then I'm keeping it where it is.

The beer came out right at 1.090.  I'm using US-05, and I used 2 oz. each of Amarillo, Centennial and Columbus on a 30 minute hop stand at 140*.  I'll do the same hops in the same amounts for dry-hopping.  Can't wait to taste it!

97
The Pub / Re: podcasts
« on: March 16, 2016, 09:37:12 AM »
Those are the ones I listen to as well.  I gave up on the brewing network though.  I just got weary of all the stupid humor and peripheral crap that seemed like it took up 50% of the podcast.  I want beer info.

98
Ingredients / Re: Red X IIPA
« on: March 16, 2016, 09:27:05 AM »
I brewed this yesterday.  I followed the second recipe I posted above: 11 lbs. Red X, 10 lbs. Pilsner.

I like the color but it is not red.  After I taste this iteration I may bumping the ratio to 75% Red X on the next one.


99
I just got to this thread. I started a yeast bank, but need many more tubes. If they are still available, I will buy two dozen. Looks like there is another like minded soul in southern MD also!

Mark is on vacation from the forum for a bit.

100
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: When "hot" breweries get stale
« on: March 15, 2016, 11:12:57 AM »
I'm old enough to remember when the only option to macro lagers was Anchor Steam beer.

As to your main point, I think 'new' has been largely tapped out, and I am happy with having a great selection of styles. It is a wonderful thing that most communities of any size have access to the entire BJCP category list!

So yes I am somewhat tired of breweries anxiously trying to invent.  Especially the new 'unusual ingredient' beers are tiresome to me (I'm looking at you Dogfish Head).  Maybe the new 'new' will be yeast driven beers like the Bret strains that are being identified or wild strains.  I'd love to see regional yeast strains like what developed in Belgium.  I wish I could channel my inner Mark (S. Cerevisiae) and isolate a native wild Yakima yeast that contributed something great!

101
Ingredients / Re: Red X IIPA
« on: March 14, 2016, 08:13:51 PM »
Awesome!  That's what I needed to know.  Thanks guys.  This is what I think I'll try.  It should be red enough.

11 lbs Red X Malt (12.0 SRM) Grain 50.0 %
10 lbs Pilsner Malt (Rahr) (1.7 SRM)  45.5 %
1 lbs Sugar, Table (Sucrose) (1.0 SRM)

102
Ingredients / Red X IIPA
« on: March 14, 2016, 07:35:45 PM »
I am finally going to brew with Red X.  I have wanted to for over a year.  Tomorrow I'm brewing a red Imperial IPA.  Those that have used this malt, please chime in on what you think of my malt bill... while I still have time to change it.

13 lbs Red X Malt (12.0 SRM)  59.1 %
6 lbs Pale Ale Malt 2-Row (Briess) (3.5 SRM)  27.3 %
2 lbs Munich Malt - 10L (10.0 SRM)  9.1 %
1 lbs Sugar, Table (Sucrose) (1.0 SRM)

103
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: acrid/ashy character?
« on: March 11, 2016, 05:30:12 PM »
I've gotten that flavor/sensation from (I think) Brown Malt.  It you are describing what I am talking about, it goes away with a little time...say a month or so.

104
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Full Boil Impact
« on: March 11, 2016, 05:27:24 PM »
Being the picky sort, I thought I'd chime in ;-)

A list of flavors from melanoidins from Designing Great Beers, by Ray Daniels:
"Chocolate, Rye bread, Musty, Violets, Buttery, Burnt, Toasted, Fruity aromatic, Rose perfume, Rock candy, Caramel, Bready, maple syrup, Burnt protein, Sweet"

However this is from malt, NOT from the boil.  My understanding is that there is very little melanoidin development in even the most vigorous boil - the level is probably just academic as opposed to something discernable.


Ya know, that book is old enough you have to know what to use and what to ignore.  When it was written, it was common in the brewing world to refer to melanoidins as flavors.  As brewing got more precise, the terminology did also.

But do we not get a lot of those flavors based on roasting or kilning malts to varying levels, and are they not a direct result of melanoidin development?  If not, what accounts for the variety of flavors and flavor changes that occur at differing lovibond levels in malts?

No, those flavors are due to Maillard reactions.  The same reactions create melaniodins also, but they are 2 different things.

Well I guess that's a good example of why you write brewing books and I read them.

105
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Full Boil Impact
« on: March 11, 2016, 02:09:13 PM »
Being the picky sort, I thought I'd chime in ;-)

A list of flavors from melanoidins from Designing Great Beers, by Ray Daniels:
"Chocolate, Rye bread, Musty, Violets, Buttery, Burnt, Toasted, Fruity aromatic, Rose perfume, Rock candy, Caramel, Bready, maple syrup, Burnt protein, Sweet"

However this is from malt, NOT from the boil.  My understanding is that there is very little melanoidin development in even the most vigorous boil - the level is probably just academic as opposed to something discernable.


Ya know, that book is old enough you have to know what to use and what to ignore.  When it was written, it was common in the brewing world to refer to melanoidins as flavors.  As brewing got more precise, the terminology did also.

But do we not get a lot of those flavors based on roasting or kilning malts to varying levels, and are they not a direct result of melanoidin development?  If not, what accounts for the variety of flavors and flavor changes that occur at differing lovibond levels in malts?

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