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Messages - reverseapachemaster

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181
Equipment and Software / Re: Bru'n Water profile for a Gose?
« on: November 19, 2016, 09:47:30 AM »
I think yellow balanced is the right target for the style. I would build the water without regard for your later salt addition to make sure you have all the other minerals where they need to be and then add the additional salt. I assume you'll add the additional salt at the end of the boil or later in which case you still need mash ph and calcium levels within a suitable range to get good conversion.

182
The Pub / Re: What's the Weather Like Where You Are?
« on: November 19, 2016, 09:44:32 AM »
It got cold in a hurry last night. We hit freezing briefly last night. This is our first feel of anything resembling winter.

We'll get another cool night and my wife is going out for a friend's birthday. I'm going to take another swing at a spontaneous fermentation.

183
All Grain Brewing / Re: Final gravity
« on: November 18, 2016, 09:43:24 AM »
Refractometer definitely needs correction for FG. Forum member Sean Terrill's calculator is very good for this: http://www.seanterrill.com/2012/01/06/refractometer-calculator/

Refractometer results are not as precise as I would like but for small batches it's pretty much the only way you can take readings. I brew a lot of one and two gallon batches. Two hydrometer readings out of a gallon is about a tenth of the batch. Taking a few drops at a time lets me take as many gravity readings as I need.

184
Ingredients / Re: Your favorite malt and hop of the year.
« on: November 18, 2016, 09:38:47 AM »
Where did you get the Aurora. I got a pound and found they taste really muddy.

I don't think Aurora tastes muddy; it's possible you got a poorly handled pound of hops.

OTOH you may just taste the flavor of that particular hop that way. Styrian hops and Fuggles are related. Much in the same way people find Fuggles's earthy flavor to taste like straight dirt, you may find earthy elements of Aurora overwhelming.

185
Ingredients / Re: Your favorite malt and hop of the year.
« on: November 18, 2016, 09:36:26 AM »
I tried making and using torrified wheat for the first time this week and really liked what it delivered. Otherwise I'm not terribly exotic with my grain choices.

I found using a huge amount of nugget in an amber delivered a great peach and woody flavor. I'm obviously several years behind on hop exploration so nothing too exotic there either.

I'm a huge fan of Aurora; it's my secret weapon for a lot of continental styles. I find it has a great balance of spice, floral and fruit notes that work well by itself and in combination with a lot of hops. For me it's the perfect glue in a mix of hops for lagers, saisons, etc. much in the same way people use centennial and simcoe in IPAs and pale ales with other hops. 

186
All Grain Brewing / Re: Question on aging stouts
« on: November 17, 2016, 10:22:44 AM »
I wouldn't be opposed to intentionally aging a mid-strength stout but I wouldn't have high hopes that a beer lacking in flavor is going to develop into something interesting with time. I'd consider it a decent candidate for making black and tans or sacrificing to brett (if that's your thing).

When I think of an underattenuated beer I don't consider it flavorless as much as clunky because it's too sweet and the sweeter malt flavors oppress everything else. It works in an imperial stout where the high ABV cuts the sweetness somewhat but in a smaller beer lacks any offsetting element. That may be what you mean though. If this is the case then aging out the beer could develop the sweetness into more interesting flavors but it will probably always be too sweet for its own good.

187
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Banking Yeast
« on: November 17, 2016, 10:07:09 AM »
When I buy a liquid yeast culture I make a starter larger than what I need for the batch. I pitch the necessary amount into the wort and transfer the remaining yeast to a mason jar. Then I can repeat that process with each subsequent beer and keep a clean culture. Sometimes I harvest the slurry from that first beer and do the same thing so I have a working line of the yeast and a clean backup.

Much earlier in my homebrewing I banked some strains. It wasn't too much work but it wasn't worth my time. I have strains in my parents' chest freezer probably six years old now that I never went back and used. I tend to use the same handful of strains for long enough that I can just work from slurry and after a year or so often want to try out a different strain.

188
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: November 16, 2016, 05:57:30 PM »
Didn't plan on brewing today but I needed to get my holiday beer moving so it will be carbed around Christmas so today became a work/brew day. Today's beer is a partigyle brown ale. Big beer is kind of an imperial brown that will get some rye whisky-soaked oak down the road. The small beer is loosely an American brown ale that will get a tincture of vanilla and cocoa nibs and go into a cask. Well, "cask".

This was my first time attempting to make torrified wheat with a popcorn popper. I felt like the beers needed a toasted element and I have a lot of unmalted wheat on hand. Really simple process and turned out nice. Very toasty and milled much easier. The only downside is having to work a few ounces at a time. I only needed a pound but it would be unreasonable for a larger volume.

189
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: removing the hot break
« on: November 15, 2016, 12:28:35 AM »
I am hardly an expert on the LODO technique but it seems like lifting the bag, no matter how slowly, creates opportunity for wort to suffer aeration even if it is just an amount draining off/out of the grain. There is also the inevitable wort squeezed out of the grain purely due to the weight of grain above that is descending through the air and splashing around in the wort beneath it.

I suppose this is not a problem if you use the bag purely as a filter and do not lift the grain bag out of the vessel.

190
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: removing the hot break
« on: November 14, 2016, 10:20:13 AM »
Aren't BIAB systems--manual or electronic--basically the antithesis of the LODO paradigm?

191
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Card benefits
« on: November 13, 2016, 11:52:24 AM »
I've had very few places not honor what is listed online.

Normally, as others have said, it's a front line employee who just doesn't know about the discount.  I have had a couple times where management said the information was wrong or they were not offering it yet. Both places seemed highly mismanaged so it wasn't too surprising.

192
Ingredients / Re: Black Garlic - Garlic Breadth
« on: November 13, 2016, 11:33:24 AM »
:o

Yeah, I like garlic but really struggle to see myself enjoying that beer.

Nevertheless, I would be interested to see what DFH has to say about it.

193
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Delirium Tremens
« on: November 13, 2016, 11:22:55 AM »
Delirium Tremens was one of the first non-BMC beers I had. Started a long love affair with Belgian beers.

194
The Pub / Re: Whole Foods
« on: November 13, 2016, 11:21:16 AM »
Is everyone else finding Chimay without issues? It's disappeared from all my local stores, trying to figure out if the importer or the distributor is to blame.

Yep, their beers are pretty much the only Belgian beers I can reliably find most places (not counting Stella Artois).

195
All Grain Brewing / Re: KBS clone
« on: November 11, 2016, 09:16:33 AM »
KBS is made with Kona and Sumatra coffee.

I would definitely find a good Sumatra for that portion. Sumatra has a very earthy flavor that can range from chocolate to herbal. It's definitely part of that beer's flavor. Sulawesi would be a good substitute.

I would not burn the cash trying to find kona. Most kona exports are blends with 10% kona and you will pay a pretty penny for a good quality pure kona coffee. IMO kona is tremendously overrated. It's Guatemalan-sourced beans grown in Kona, HI. It is not so far off a good Guatemalan for its price and quite frankly you are losing all the delicate flavors that make kona what it is when you stick it in a beer. If you can't source a good Guatemalan then any decent Central American coffee would be your next best choice.

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