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Messages - reverseapachemaster

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61
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Flat Top Black Rye IPA
« on: April 29, 2015, 07:37:57 AM »
I wonder if the east coast may have better luck with these. West coast dry IPA with tripple digit IBUs AND roast, just doesnt work for me. But something more malty and around 45 IBU with mellow roast might work.

I think you guys in the pacific northwest are still calling beers like this American stouts.

62
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Prop. 65?
« on: April 27, 2015, 09:07:51 AM »
Your best chance at determining why a prop 65 warning is on the products is to contact the manufacturer and ask. It may be the case that a prop 65 chemical was used in the manufacturing process but is not still on or in the product. It may be the case that the manufacturer puts the warning on all their products just in case a prop 65 chemical was used in or on the product.

63
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Belgian ale carbonation issues
« on: April 27, 2015, 08:45:32 AM »
At 10% ABV with Belgian yeast I would be surprised if your problem came from a lack of capable yeast. Given the ABV it may take longer but I don't know how long you have had the beer bottled.

Did you ferment these beers at warm temperatures? CO2 in solution is temperature-dependent and at warmer temperatures beer gives up more CO2 that would be part of the CO2 you want in the beer for carbonation. If you need X amount in solution plus Y amount of CO2 from the carbonation drops to reach your desired carbonation and you have less than X then you won't have enough carbonation. If you fermented in the 70s but not hotter then this is probably not your problem. Age can also play a factor in how much CO2 is in solution but in my experience not much of a problem unless the beers aged warm for months or aged for more than a few months.

It could just be the carb drops. I've heard lots of bad things about them.
This raises a question for me. Priming sugar calculators ask for the temperature of the beer. Should you plug in the the highest temperature it hit during fermentation? The temperature it was at longest? For most beers I ferment in low 60 s finish primary 68-72 ish, then put in a cool cellar for a few days to a week before bottling.

I calculate against the warmest temperature at which the beer has sat. That has never steered me wrong whether the highest temperature has been 65 or 95.

64
Wood/Casks / Re: Saving a stinky barrel?
« on: April 27, 2015, 08:39:29 AM »
That might help with the mold but not necessarily with any unwelcome and unwanted bacteria and yeast that have had an opportunity to grow in the diluted solution of water plus whatever was already in the barrel. You would have to separately deal with the yeast and bacteria to the extent you can get them fully out of the wood, which you probably cannot.

It also won't help with any compounds produced by the molds and whatever else is in there that have soaked into the wood and will not easily be removed. Remember that, just like the wine/spirit/beer that remains in the wood after it was initially drained, those compounds producing the foul odors now are also soaked into the wood.

You could try it but you might find yourself dumping the batch of beer and the barrel.

65
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bulk or bottle aging?
« on: April 27, 2015, 08:29:20 AM »
I don't think another month is enough time to develop noticeable aged character in the beer so it probably doesn't matter one way or another which approach you take. That may be more or less true depending upon the condition of the aging beer. That stout may need some time before it becomes drinkable because the alcohol is too prominent, the flavors haven't integrated well yet, etc. and if that is why you plan on aging another month then the method for aging isn't going to make much of a difference either way.

If you want to age the beer to develop an aged character then you need to look at a longer time frame and how you age it can make a difference. If you want to develop more of the oxygen-derived flavors then bulk aging would be better but some of the aged character will occur regardless of container.

66
The Pub / Re: Aged spirits in a week
« on: April 27, 2015, 08:07:42 AM »
If he figured it out as a hobbyist with the help of a biochemist then he has to know the larger distilleries and other players in the market will have no trouble replicating his efforts--if they really work.

The problem with looking at merely the oak compounds in the spirit is that it ignores some of the other processes involved. Maybe it hits all the right notes so well that it either legitimately emulates aged spirits or emulates them so well the difference will be impossible to overlook for the majority of buyers. OTOH it could be like liquid smoke: tastes like smoke initially but quickly devolves into a fake chemical taste.

67
Wood/Casks / Re: Saving a stinky barrel?
« on: April 26, 2015, 12:05:32 PM »
You put in water without any additions to lower ph or otherwise inhibit microorganisms? If so then I'd follow Jim's advice.

68
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Belgian ale carbonation issues
« on: April 26, 2015, 12:01:57 PM »
At 10% ABV with Belgian yeast I would be surprised if your problem came from a lack of capable yeast. Given the ABV it may take longer but I don't know how long you have had the beer bottled.

Did you ferment these beers at warm temperatures? CO2 in solution is temperature-dependent and at warmer temperatures beer gives up more CO2 that would be part of the CO2 you want in the beer for carbonation. If you need X amount in solution plus Y amount of CO2 from the carbonation drops to reach your desired carbonation and you have less than X then you won't have enough carbonation. If you fermented in the 70s but not hotter then this is probably not your problem. Age can also play a factor in how much CO2 is in solution but in my experience not much of a problem unless the beers aged warm for months or aged for more than a few months.

It could just be the carb drops. I've heard lots of bad things about them.

69
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: HoneyBees
« on: April 26, 2015, 11:48:40 AM »
Ditto Pete B's experience. I have a hive about 25 feet from where I brew and little to no problem.

Wasps were a problem until I found a disposable plastic bag trap. I put them out in the spring to catch the queens and keep them out during wasp season. I have about 6 set in various locations around my bees and my house and they are awesome. They have a very strong attractant that is activated when you add water and they will fill up with literally hundreds of wasps. Very, very effective. You can get them at Lowe's or Home Depot.

What brand do you use? I can tell the wasps will be bad this summer and I'd like to get a head start on the fight.

70
Events / Re: A favor to ask of the conference staff
« on: April 26, 2015, 11:23:37 AM »
Check the gym in your hotel. There is a good chance it has a scale.

71
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Gusher vs. Infection
« on: April 16, 2015, 02:12:40 PM »
If there is a lot of hop sediment in the beer then the sediment may be forming nucleation points causing gushing.

72
Events / Re: Time to kill after the NHC
« on: April 16, 2015, 06:53:44 AM »
If you have a car that is enough time to get pretty much anywhere.

73
Ingredients / Re: Peated malt
« on: April 16, 2015, 06:44:13 AM »
Some people have written off BJCP competitions in certain styles, such as saison, brett and sour beers, because the way the BJCP has structured those styles in the new guidelines and the way they are approached for certification makes judging them too inconsistent to make it worth the effort.
My own experience for brett/sours/wilds is practically the opposite.  I know of quite a few people that are chomping at the bit for the new guidelines since they don't want to just throw their brett, sour, and/or wild ales into 23 due to bad experiences there.

I'm not saying some of the changes aren't an improvement but the new styles bring along a number of problems of their own. Saison is a pretty good example. The new style guideline recognizes that saisons might be all over the place but squeezes them into the same classification where it is highly likely that, like most styles, the biggest or most exotic beer wins. So here we have a style that is incredibly diverse lumped together but then IPA is so splintered that an entrant is free to basically make up an IPA style.

The bigger problem with the BJCP is that these styles tend to be under-taught to judges (see Jim's comments) so much so that many BJCP training courses barely address them and they are barely tested. The stories of horrible judging in these styles are endless. I've personally seen judges say they don't like sour beers and score down sour beers because they just didn't like it (in cat. 23) or give the best scores to the least sour beers in the flight out of personal preferences. It seems too accepted and although these complaints have been raised to BJCP leadership it doesn't seem like they care.

74
Equipment and Software / Re: Colonna Capper/Corker Spacer.
« on: April 15, 2015, 08:51:03 AM »
It's definitely not a perfect piece but I needed it mostly for capping 750s with 29mm caps with the occasional corking. 95% of the time I use it for capping 750s so it does its job perfectly.

I compared it against the floor corkers and it didn't make sense to opt for either model. I don't have the storage space for either and it would have added a bit of cost for the more expensive corker plus having to buy the 29mm bell. I don't use the colonna enough to have justified the added space and cost. If I corked more beer I probably would have.

75
I know that the corny keg posts are different, but I don't know why it was ever setup this way. Most kegs are labeled inlet and outlet so you can tell which post/disconnect belongs where, but I don't know why.

Of the four kegs I have I am 99.999% sure there are no labels on the kegs identifying which post is which and even if there were labels there is always the chance that after cleaning I accidentally reverse the tubes.

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