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Messages - reverseapachemaster

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721
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Mini Kegs
« on: March 20, 2014, 07:38:27 AM »
I believe there are more than a few German brewers who export the 5l kegs to the US. Paulaner and Warsteiner are the easiest to find but locally I've also seen a schwarzbier and I seem to think a pilsner or two. I bet you could host a party over the summer and clear out a few of them with the help of friends/neighbors.

The schawrzbier I've seen is Kostriker (or something like that).  It's actually quite good.

That would be the one.

I seem to think the other pilsner that shows up in our area is Bitburger but I might be wrong.

722
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Can a sour turn non-sour?
« on: March 20, 2014, 07:37:12 AM »
This post peaked my curiosity on the matter of Brett being able to break down some acids.  I would imagine that some Bretts are more aggressive about this than others?  For example, Jolly Pumpkin sours are generally not very tart (say compared to Sour in the Rye or La Folie).  I don't have any experience with JP dregs, but I've heard Ethan Tripp talk about how their Brett is so aggressive that he keeps those dregs separate from other dregs beers.

I would assume just as a matter of genetic diversity some strains are more aggressive than others. However, my understanding is that like sacc, brett will metabolize available food sources in a particular order. That usually begins with consuming sugars and then starches before scavenging for other food sources like ethanol and whatever else it will consume. So if that is the case then I would expect the ethanol and acid metabolism will always occur with time and at least some of that metabolism may require a certain level of oxidation.

723
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: My last negra modello
« on: March 20, 2014, 07:30:20 AM »
NM used to be a fair compromise with people who weren't into craft beer. Now there are enough good options that I can find something locally produced to fill that void. It's too bad its standards are sliding.

If I find myself stuck drinking Mexican beer I try to track down a Victoria.

724
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: One gallon blow off
« on: March 20, 2014, 07:13:29 AM »
With the three piece airlocks you can take off the top two pieces and attach a blowoff tube to run into a container of water.

725
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: strawberry milk chocolate stout
« on: March 20, 2014, 07:12:11 AM »
Probably not. Strawberry doesn't come through very well unless you keep a lot of sugar behind in the beer and that normally requires halting fermentation before adding the strawberries and force carbonating.

726
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Can a sour turn non-sour?
« on: March 19, 2014, 06:20:49 AM »
Over a very long period of time a sour beer will get less sour. Not the same as a clean beer but definitely not the biting acidity of a young sour beer. Brett can metabolize some acids as well as ethanol. However, that process is long. Think years, not months. When I bottled the three year old portion of the gueuze I blended in December I was surprised by how not sour it was although I bottled a portion of that beer when it was a year old and that portion is still sour.

The lactic acidity will smooth out with time and I usually find that happens around the 12-18 month mark. That may be what happened to OP. I'd want to know more about what the beer tastes like besides blackberry to try to diagnose what's going on. It may also be the case that the blackberry went in and the sugars were consumed by brett faster than any lactic acid bacteria so no additional acidity was created. That would give you a beer with the same volume of lactic acid but less lactic acid compared to the amount of ethanol and flavor compounds in the beer, making the acidity less prominent.

727
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Mini Kegs
« on: March 19, 2014, 06:14:08 AM »
I believe there are more than a few German brewers who export the 5l kegs to the US. Paulaner and Warsteiner are the easiest to find but locally I've also seen a schwarzbier and I seem to think a pilsner or two. I bet you could host a party over the summer and clear out a few of them with the help of friends/neighbors.

728
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Colder starter
« on: March 19, 2014, 06:01:38 AM »
Not sure which strain is really being discussed here but I am sure the temperature is fine for the starter.

729
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Inspire me.
« on: March 18, 2014, 06:02:05 AM »
Why not brew something big to age into next winter? Make that last brew that feels like winter and by the time you're packaging the beer it will feel like spring.

730
Ingredients / Re: Advice on adding Basil to a Saison
« on: March 17, 2014, 06:31:29 AM »
I've seen suggestions of 1-2 ounces but I would probably start off with a lesser amount and add more if I felt it needed it.

731
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Harvesting yeast from commercial beers
« on: March 17, 2014, 06:28:48 AM »
It's a fairly easy process but takes some time and sanitation is really important. I have a few Belgian strains I've cultured and use/have banked in my brewery.

If there is a strain you want then you should start building up a culture from a bottle at your first opportunity rather than waiting for the time when you need the strain because you might end up waiting a few weeks to grow up appropriate numbers for a full batch of beer. You can always save your culture in your fridge until you need it.

732
I think the obvious answer is in the OP. You're going to force your way through several rests at lower temperatures that will have an effect on the beer. You may not need/want the effects of those rests on your beer.

From a practical standpoint I believe it takes less energy to raise just the water volume to 170 than raise the water and grain together to 150. I could be wrong on that one.

733
I vote for clean and sanitize the equipment. I use my bottling equipment for sour and non-sour beer and do not have crossover infections.

Ok, then advise as to your cleaning and sanitizing routine - prolonged PBW soak?

Really nothing unusual, except maybe a longer soak.

As soon as I finish bottling whatever I'm bottling I immediately get in and start cleaning. It's far easier to get everything clean while it's still wet. There's no time for brett to cough up a biofilm and hide itself. Hot water rinse and if there is visible debris on/in the equipment then I scrub with a soft sponge or for my one gallon glass jugs I use a bottle brush. Soap is used if there's a lot of debris. Then rinse several times, fill with hot water and mix in oxyclean. I let it soak for a week and then dump, rinse several times and let dry. Then I sanitize with starsan before the next use.

Some comments above discussed possible infections in the bottles. That is certainly likely although I would compare infected bottles side by side and see how similar the infection is in taste and aroma. I would be surprised if an entire collection of 40 or whatever number of bottles had the exact same wild yeast or bacteria.

A whole week in oxyclean?  Does oxyclean continue to work after a few days?

The company that produces oxyclean says it stays effective for six hours but from watching it remove stains in buckets I find it takes more than six hours to remove the stain and seems to continue to work for several days. I might be overdoing it with cleaning after bottling sour beer but I haven't had a problem letting the bottling bucket and bottling equipment soak that long. Definitely no mold problems.

734
There was a thread here earlier in the week discussing this but the short of it is that you will get basically the same beer cutting the ingredients by 1/5 except you do not want to cut your water to 1/5 because your boil off doesn't decline because your batch is smaller. If anything, if your surface to volume ratio increases because the beer is more shallow in the same pot you would use for five gallon batches then you may need to dial your boil off rate up.

735
I vote for clean and sanitize the equipment. I use my bottling equipment for sour and non-sour beer and do not have crossover infections.

Ok, then advise as to your cleaning and sanitizing routine - prolonged PBW soak?

Really nothing unusual, except maybe a longer soak.

As soon as I finish bottling whatever I'm bottling I immediately get in and start cleaning. It's far easier to get everything clean while it's still wet. There's no time for brett to cough up a biofilm and hide itself. Hot water rinse and if there is visible debris on/in the equipment then I scrub with a soft sponge or for my one gallon glass jugs I use a bottle brush. Soap is used if there's a lot of debris. Then rinse several times, fill with hot water and mix in oxyclean. I let it soak for a week and then dump, rinse several times and let dry. Then I sanitize with starsan before the next use.

Some comments above discussed possible infections in the bottles. That is certainly likely although I would compare infected bottles side by side and see how similar the infection is in taste and aroma. I would be surprised if an entire collection of 40 or whatever number of bottles had the exact same wild yeast or bacteria.

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