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Messages - reverseapachemaster

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826
I vote for clean and sanitize the equipment. I use my bottling equipment for sour and non-sour beer and do not have crossover infections.

Ok, then advise as to your cleaning and sanitizing routine - prolonged PBW soak?

Really nothing unusual, except maybe a longer soak.

As soon as I finish bottling whatever I'm bottling I immediately get in and start cleaning. It's far easier to get everything clean while it's still wet. There's no time for brett to cough up a biofilm and hide itself. Hot water rinse and if there is visible debris on/in the equipment then I scrub with a soft sponge or for my one gallon glass jugs I use a bottle brush. Soap is used if there's a lot of debris. Then rinse several times, fill with hot water and mix in oxyclean. I let it soak for a week and then dump, rinse several times and let dry. Then I sanitize with starsan before the next use.

Some comments above discussed possible infections in the bottles. That is certainly likely although I would compare infected bottles side by side and see how similar the infection is in taste and aroma. I would be surprised if an entire collection of 40 or whatever number of bottles had the exact same wild yeast or bacteria.

827
Beer Travel / Re: Portland and Seattle
« on: March 16, 2014, 08:49:54 AM »
I'm also making this trip with my wife in early April. Apparently this is quite a popular route. I think our plan with Seattle is to take a break from drinking and see the city but we are drinking our way through Portland and driving down to Bend to take down the ale trail.

You can't take a break from drinking in Seattle. It isn't allowed  >:(

See the city, and drink our beer!

I'd rather drink through Seattle but we're going up for eight days. We have to take a break at some point and while we're in Seattle we're visiting family that has little kids in the house. Probably not the best place to show up after drinking all day.

828
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Speeding up fermentation
« on: March 15, 2014, 09:54:29 AM »
Give your yeast an impassioned pep talk daily.

829
I vote for clean and sanitize the equipment. I use my bottling equipment for sour and non-sour beer and do not have crossover infections.

830
Beer Travel / Re: Portland and Seattle
« on: March 15, 2014, 09:49:31 AM »
I'm also making this trip with my wife in early April. Apparently this is quite a popular route. I think our plan with Seattle is to take a break from drinking and see the city but we are drinking our way through Portland and driving down to Bend to take down the ale trail.

831
Beer Recipes / Re: Rye Stout
« on: March 14, 2014, 05:46:25 AM »
I have a rye stout schedule for later this year and if I scaled it up to 11 gallons it would be 2.5 pounds of chocolate rye and a little over four pounds of roasted barley. I don't cold steep though, so I'm not sure how to adjust that up for cold steeping.

If chocolate rye isn't immediately available as an organic grain then you could always toss some rye malt in the oven and run it up to a darker color.

832
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Berliner Weiss Starter question
« on: March 14, 2014, 05:39:26 AM »
I agree you should add the lacto first and let it sour before pitching your yeast. Far easier to hit the level of acidity you want and then add the yeast than to force the two organisms to compete at the same time. The yeast will normally win.

833
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Scaling recipes
« on: March 13, 2014, 07:03:42 AM »
Thanks for the input. Also, thanks to all of you that have helped the last times I have posted. I am convinced that home brewers are the most helpful and friendliest group. As a newbie on some other forums, I have been left feeling stupid for asking what others felt was an obvious answer.
The questions I have posted here may have also been an obvious answer to another, but no one here ever, made me feel dumb for asking. Thanks to all of you.

I suspect with one guess I could pick the forum and the particular poster who made you feel stupid for asking questions.

As erockrph points out, halving the recipe is pretty much dead on except you need to keep the boil off rate constant. The only thing I would add is that your boil off rate may actually increase if you are using a large pot for five gallon batches as you would a 2.5 gallon batch. Greater surface to volume ratio allows for greater boil off. However, just keep it constant the first time and see how much you are short wort volume after the boil. That will let you know whether the boil off is fairly consistent or if you need to change that number.

834
Homebrew Competitions / Re: Thoughts/Opinions
« on: March 12, 2014, 06:27:57 AM »
I'm surprised my hops are still alive. 85 yesterday, 35 today.

835
All Grain Brewing / Re: lactic acid to acidify sparge water
« on: March 12, 2014, 06:21:30 AM »
I'd venture a guess that by adding the minerals to the mash you're not giving them an opportunity to dissolve into the sparge water and have their intended effect.

836
Beer Travel / Re: Las Vegas road trip: where to fill my growlers?
« on: March 11, 2014, 06:03:21 AM »
I like Sin City's hefeweizen but I'm not sure how that survives in a growler driving across the country or whether you can find it somewhere that fills growlers. I'd skip anything else they have to offer.


837
Homebrew Competitions / Re: Thoughts/Opinions
« on: March 11, 2014, 05:59:13 AM »
It's supposed to be sunny and 58° tomorrow.

THAT IS GOOD WEATHER.

838
Hop Growing / Re: Indoor Hops?
« on: March 11, 2014, 05:51:04 AM »
With the rain & sun we've had here in the bay area, my Magnums are about 3' tall.  I hope to get them trained to go horizontal when they get to the top.

Damn mine just broke ground and are three inches tall at best.

839
Hop Growing / Re: Hop selection
« on: March 09, 2014, 09:35:07 AM »
There are several of the US noble-type varieties that grow well across the country. I have sterling and mt. hood here in Texas and both grow about as well as my nugget and cascade.

840
Ingredients / Re: Strawberries in a porter
« on: March 09, 2014, 09:32:58 AM »
I've had two strawberry beers that were worth drinking. One was good and the other was great. Both were milk stouts but the same process should apply. In each case they knocked off the yeast before adding the strawberries so the sugars in the strawberries wouldn't ferment out. Then they kegged after the strawberry flavor was extracted. I don't recall what I was told about the amount of strawberries used but it was a high pound to gallon ratio.

Fruit flavors are driven by acidity, sweetness, or a combination of both. Strawberries are low-acidity fruit. The flavor stands out with sweetness. When you ferment out of the sugar and leave the strawberries in an acidic beer you don't get much in the way of strawberry flavor. This same premise is why high-acidity fruit, like cherries and raspberries, work so well in beer.

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