Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hulkavitch

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5
31
All Grain Brewing / 2 beers, 2 yeasts, same nasty sulfur smell and taste
« on: February 07, 2013, 09:55:16 AM »
boiled for 60 mins in cold cold weather I wasnt surprised that i missed my gravity. Next time I would do a 90 min boil but I dont know if I would do 90 in the summer.

32
All Grain Brewing / 2 beers, 2 yeasts, same nasty sulfur smell and taste
« on: February 06, 2013, 08:15:07 PM »
not light struck that is for sure. fermented in basement and went into brown bottles and then put back in the basement.

33
All Grain Brewing / 2 beers, 2 yeasts, same nasty sulfur smell and taste
« on: February 06, 2013, 08:13:49 PM »
the beers fermented for about three week in primary and then were bottled. The wit beer only has a few weeks in the bottles. The tricky thing about aging out sulfur is that I have been told wheat beers have a shorter shelf life and are intended to be drunk early. I dont know if that means a month or 2 or what?

34
All Grain Brewing / 2 beers, 2 yeasts, same nasty sulfur smell and taste
« on: February 06, 2013, 05:04:33 PM »
in defense of my water i live in a very hard water zone and it was the simplest way i could find im order to get my ra down to an appropriate level for this beer. People around here tend to have good success with their dark beers but their lighter beers tend to miss the mark.


Which I tend to correlate with the water they are using. My cream ale and american hefes come out great. But i use kolsh and cal ale yeast with them.

I think it is the yeast strains? I just want to figure out how to avoid or correct this sulfur problem. I thought about trying white labs instead?   Maybe it is the ferm temperatures?

35
All Grain Brewing / 2 beers, 2 yeasts, same nasty sulfur smell and taste
« on: February 06, 2013, 04:46:23 PM »
bottled didnt keg. next on my list: kegging sysytem.

the bavarian was pretty similar in process water profile not much different.

36
All Grain Brewing / 2 beers, 2 yeasts, same nasty sulfur smell and taste
« on: February 06, 2013, 04:44:10 PM »
the wit recipe:

5 lbs pils
4 lbs flaked wheat
1 lb flaked oats
8 oz rice hulls
4 oz munich
1 oz hallertauer added at 60 mins

.4 oz corriander (indian) lightly cracked
.03 oz chamomile flowers egyptian
and 1.5 oz of fresh orange zest
all added with 5 mins left.


1.5 L starter with pils dme gravity of starter around 1.040, yeast nutrient added to starter. wyeast 3944 package was only 2 weeks old

water distilled with 0.8 g gypsum, .6 epsom, 0.2 canning salt 1.6 cacl,  added to mash water
sparge: 1.1 gypsum, .9 epsom, .2 canning salt, 2.2 cacl,

finished water profile: 51 ppm ca, 5 ppm mg, 5 ppm sodium, 56 ppm sulfate, 72 ppm chloride, ra -39, so4/cl ratio .78  mash ph 5.4

mashed 60 mins single infusion with a batch sparge. intended 152 landed about 150
sparge water 168 F

pre boil gravity spot on post boil missed target low by i think 4 points 1.046. 60 min boil. chilled with immersion chiller quickly outside in freezing cold 30 mins down to 165.

transferred to fermenter and back and forth between two buckets 5-6 times to aerate. pitched and sealed.

fermented for three weeks at 65 degrees. with my johnson....not my penis



37
All Grain Brewing / 2 beers, 2 yeasts, same nasty sulfur smell and taste
« on: February 06, 2013, 03:50:11 PM »
Two recent beers I have made (a bavarian hefe and a wit)  finished with a heavy sulfur aroma and taste. It was almost discourage from making another wit and since it is my second failed bavarian hefe I dont think I will make another soon (aside from the sulfur my bavarians have been all clove and no banana).

wyeast 3944 and 3068 were used respectively. Fermented at 65 F with a chest freezer and johnson.

What is wrong? What can be done to avoid this in the future?

Thanks

38
All Grain Brewing / wit beer
« on: December 16, 2012, 01:11:58 PM »
on a side note, i have never understood the whole hot side aeration bit. any o2 is going to be driven off in the boil right?

39
All Grain Brewing / wit beer
« on: December 15, 2012, 08:24:45 PM »

I mash in a cooler but I do the step mashes by using my boil kettle to do the steps and then transfer the mash into my cooler when I get to the final rest temp (pre-heat it first with some hot water so that you don't get a big temp drop).
Not sure what you mean when you say you can't heat your mash tun but if you can heat the water (unless you're all electric I guess), you can do the step and make it work.
[/quote]

I never thought to mash in my boil kettle initially.  When I say I cant heat my tun i mean it is a cooler and i cant put it on a burner. What   is the temp of your pre-heated ?  Dont you lose a lot of temperature in the transfer? Do you overshoot your mash temperature to compensate for the transfer to the cooler?

40
All Grain Brewing / wit beer
« on: December 15, 2012, 06:38:22 PM »
Thinking about using the following recipe for a wit beer. My question is, is a step mash necessary? I am not able to heat my mash tun. if a step mash is necessary, what should be the initial water/grist ratio? What ratio should i end at?

Blanche Oreiller
(5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)
OG = 1.050 (12.4 °P)  FG = 1.011 (2.8 °P) 
IBU = 20  SRM: 4  ABV = 5.0%

Ingredients
 
4.5 lb. (2.0 kg) flaked wheat (1 °L)
4.9 lb. (2.2 kg) Pilsner malt (1.6 °L)
1.1 lb. (0.5 kg) flaked oats (1 °L)
0.25 lb. (113 g) Munich malt (8 °L)
0.5 lb. (227 g) rice hulls or other natural filter
4 AAU Hallertau hops (60 mins) (1.0 oz/28 g of 4% alpha acids)
1.5 oz. (43 g) fresh citrus zest (5 mins)
0.4 oz. (11 g) crushed coriander seed (5 mins)
0.03 oz. (1 g) dried chamomile flowers (5 mins)
Wyeast 3944 (Belgian Witbier), White Labs WLP400 (Belgian Wit Ale) or Brewferm Blanche dried yeast

Step by Step

Mill the grains (including the flaked grains, but excluding the rice hulls). Mix the rice hulls into the grain post milling and dough-in targeting a mash of around 1.5 quarts of water to one pound of grain (a liquor-to-grist ratio of about 3:1 by weight) and a temperature of 122 °F (50 °C). Hold the mash at 122 °F (50 °C) for 15 minutes then raise the temperature over the next 15 minutes to 154 °F (68 °C). Hold until conversion is complete, about 60 to 90 minutes. Raise the temperature to mash out at 168 °F (76 °C). Sparge slowly with 170 °F (77 °C) water, collecting wort until the pre-boil kettle volume is around 6.5 gallons (25 L) and the gravity is 1.039 (9.7 °P).

41
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Repitching post lager?
« on: October 23, 2012, 02:28:26 PM »
I think I will lager it for 2-3 weeks then


42
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Repitching post lager?
« on: October 23, 2012, 09:22:03 AM »
Revisited the podcast: he says 1-2 months.


43
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Repitching post lager?
« on: October 23, 2012, 09:11:46 AM »
Extended lagering was suggested by Jamil Z. on his show on kolsch /altbier I believe. That is where I got my information. If the information is wrong I am more than happy to go with a shorter duration.

44
Yeast and Fermentation / Repitching post lager?
« on: October 22, 2012, 08:41:32 PM »
Going to brew a kolsch ferment in the 60s for a couple weeks and then lager it for a few months, 2-3?  My question is: will I need to repitch at bottling. Or can I just bottle?




45
Equipment and Software / Re: Thermowell filled up with water
« on: October 08, 2012, 03:23:39 PM »
Positive I didn't get sanitizer in it. I will try the damp rid out



Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5