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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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1
Other Fermentables / Re: half assed first cider attempt
« on: December 08, 2016, 07:08:58 AM »
This is still sitting in the fermenter. It was at 1.004 a few weeks ago. I have decided to backesweeten and keg it instead of having bottles of champagne.

What and how much should I use to backseeten?
Some guy I know who makes good cider says to get in the 1.006-1.008 range IIRC.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 07, 2016, 08:33:55 AM »
http://www.homebrewing.org/AIH-New-Double-Rubber-Handle-25-Gal-Keg_p_5101.html

Order 1 for $79
Order 2 for $148
Order 3 for $217 ($72.33 ea)
Thanks for taking the time. When I have a chance later I'm getting 2 or 3. If I get two I'll post so everyone will know that tomorrow they probably will be buy one get one free. 8)
keep an eye out for holiday promotions and keg sales.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 05:33:44 PM »
The Hamilton VisiTrace DO probes are reported to sense 0 to 2 ppm DO at temps up to 85C. That would suffice for mash use. I was lusting after them at last year's CBC but the $2k price tag was too much for me.

Thanks Martin for taking the time to write.
I would love to see the validation tests this company has run.
I am a bit suspicious because many researchers have indicated that measuring DO in the mash is not directly possible, and none of the published data uses a DO meter.

In the Stability of Beer chapter of the Handbook of Brewing, 2012, August Gresser writes: It is known that oxygen at higher temperatures reacts with polyphenols, anthocyanes and tannoids. Brighter beers that are richer in polyphenols are more sensitive to oxygen in comparison with medium - colored beer and, especially, darker beers. For this reason, the brewer should carefully monitor the presence of oxygen with instruments during wort filtration and also during mashing, wort boiling or in general in the field of higher temperatures. Oxygen cannot be determined during the mashing process – one can take values from empirical procedures...

In Enzymic and Non-Enzymic Oxidation in the Brewhouse,  1999, Bamforth states:
An additional complication concerns the assessment of oxygen consumption at this stage in the process. Direct measurement of oxygen in mash is fraught with difficulty and most people have reverted to redox measurements (using redox probes or colorimetric techniques) to gain an indication of the extent of oxidative damage. The interpretation and relevance of such measurements is by no means straightforward.
The Gresser quote is of interest. It fits some of my taste experiences in Germany.

Kunze touches on it as well( chapter 2 I think, malt section). The dark malts and beers having more oxygen reduction potential.
Do hops cover up the oxidized malt flavor? The Franconian Helles that I have had are more hoppy than around Munich. Some will not have any trace of oxidized flavors others you get something in the first sip, then you taste the flavor hops on the second sip. Third sip you say, what was that flavor?
I suppose they could depending how late the hops were added, and how much flavor they have in the beer. What are the oxidized flavors you are seeing? Honey?
Oxidized is my best description, maybe a little beyond paper, not cardboard. Not clean and sweet.

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 03:12:45 PM »
The Hamilton VisiTrace DO probes are reported to sense 0 to 2 ppm DO at temps up to 85C. That would suffice for mash use. I was lusting after them at last year's CBC but the $2k price tag was too much for me.

Thanks Martin for taking the time to write.
I would love to see the validation tests this company has run.
I am a bit suspicious because many researchers have indicated that measuring DO in the mash is not directly possible, and none of the published data uses a DO meter.

In the Stability of Beer chapter of the Handbook of Brewing, 2012, August Gresser writes: It is known that oxygen at higher temperatures reacts with polyphenols, anthocyanes and tannoids. Brighter beers that are richer in polyphenols are more sensitive to oxygen in comparison with medium - colored beer and, especially, darker beers. For this reason, the brewer should carefully monitor the presence of oxygen with instruments during wort filtration and also during mashing, wort boiling or in general in the field of higher temperatures. Oxygen cannot be determined during the mashing process – one can take values from empirical procedures...

In Enzymic and Non-Enzymic Oxidation in the Brewhouse,  1999, Bamforth states:
An additional complication concerns the assessment of oxygen consumption at this stage in the process. Direct measurement of oxygen in mash is fraught with difficulty and most people have reverted to redox measurements (using redox probes or colorimetric techniques) to gain an indication of the extent of oxidative damage. The interpretation and relevance of such measurements is by no means straightforward.
The Gresser quote is of interest. It fits some of my taste experiences in Germany.

Kunze touches on it as well( chapter 2 I think, malt section). The dark malts and beers having more oxygen reduction potential.
Do hops cover up the oxidized malt flavor? The Franconian Helles that I have had are more hoppy than around Munich. Some will not have any trace of oxidized flavors others you get something in the first sip, then you taste the flavor hops on the second sip. Third sip you say, what was that flavor?

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 02:37:57 PM »
The Hamilton VisiTrace DO probes are reported to sense 0 to 2 ppm DO at temps up to 85C. That would suffice for mash use. I was lusting after them at last year's CBC but the $2k price tag was too much for me.

Thanks Martin for taking the time to write.
I would love to see the validation tests this company has run.
I am a bit suspicious because many researchers have indicated that measuring DO in the mash is not directly possible, and none of the published data uses a DO meter.

In the Stability of Beer chapter of the Handbook of Brewing, 2012, August Gresser writes: It is known that oxygen at higher temperatures reacts with polyphenols, anthocyanes and tannoids. Brighter beers that are richer in polyphenols are more sensitive to oxygen in comparison with medium - colored beer and, especially, darker beers. For this reason, the brewer should carefully monitor the presence of oxygen with instruments during wort filtration and also during mashing, wort boiling or in general in the field of higher temperatures. Oxygen cannot be determined during the mashing process – one can take values from empirical procedures...

In Enzymic and Non-Enzymic Oxidation in the Brewhouse,  1999, Bamforth states:
An additional complication concerns the assessment of oxygen consumption at this stage in the process. Direct measurement of oxygen in mash is fraught with difficulty and most people have reverted to redox measurements (using redox probes or colorimetric techniques) to gain an indication of the extent of oxidative damage. The interpretation and relevance of such measurements is by no means straightforward.
The Gresser quote is of interest. It fits some of my taste experiences in Germany.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 06, 2016, 01:34:01 PM »
They are $89 now and they are running a "spend more, save more sale."  AIH does tend to raise the prices on the kegs to counter balance their promos.
Steve, if it's no trouble do you mind posting a link? I'm seeing one choice for a 2.5 gallon keg and it's $119.
From being in the shop, IIRC those are the Italian mfg kegs @$119.
http://www.homebrewing.org/25-Gal-Keg-Single-Metal-HandleRubber-Bottom_p_4529.html

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 06, 2016, 05:56:24 AM »
Sounds like MoreBeer is probably your best bet, Pete, since it's in PA. And you probably won't find used 2.5 gallon kegs, but the new ones at Adventures in Homebrewing are fantastic. I have 3 of them. You can generally get them for $75 each, which is very reasonable for new kegs.
That is a better price than I Have seen for 2.5 gallons. Why are these particular kegs fantastic?
They're ISO 9001 certified and NSF approved, they're good quality. They're $79 on AiH right now, but if you time it right, you can get them for $69 each. I timed it bad this last time I bought some, which was Black Friday when they were $69 (I had ordered 2 on the Monday before Black Friday, D'oh!).
+1 to all this. I have several of the 2.5 gallon kegs. I've gotten them from both AiH and AHS (appears to be same brand at both stores), and they have all been great out of the box. I've also gotten a few of the same ones in 5 gallons to use as my fermentation kegs.

And AFAIC, I don't know why anyone would buy used kegs any more. You can get new ones on sale for within 5 bucks of what you'd pay for used ones. Seems like a no-brainer to me.
Yes those are the same kegs. AiH bought AHS about 2 years ago. The guy who had AHS started a brewery, and sold the Homebrew shop.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pale Lager off flavors
« on: December 04, 2016, 07:52:32 PM »
I had a beer years back that smelled of old dirty socks. It was the only one I had like that, and attribute it to some Glacier whole hops that had not been stored properly before I got them, it was a 1 lb bag. Yep isovolaric acid.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« on: December 04, 2016, 07:45:28 PM »
Thank You I will look into the step infusion for my future brews. I know there are options for it in Beersmith.

https://youtu.be/LyvVE-t_Trc

The gentleman's name is Michael James.

Are their a lot of people that don't care for the BJCP?

BJCP? There are some that don't care for it, there was a thread on here where there were negative comments as to the quality of judges.

Charlie has not been involved with the BJCP for a long time, it is a separate entity from the AHA and BA. They split in 1995 if an old club newsletter is correct. The AHA went their own way for a while with guidelines, but in 2000 accepted the BJCP guidelines for competitions. All to bring folks up to speed.

British Brewers do single steps. Many craft breweries learned to brew on a commercial scale in England in the 1980s, so that is why many craft breweries do it. That works fine with British and American malts that are designed for it.

German Brewers? Well some still decoct, some are said to not, and there are some that only decoct certain beers. 

10
Ingredients / Re: hop hash
« on: December 03, 2016, 01:32:37 PM »
I saw this on Cyber Monday.... so basically hop hash is the fine goodness that slips through the cracks of processing? ....into the keef catcher of hops???
The hammer mill will be coated with the sticky lupulin glands and resins, as it is a violent operation, I imagine there is a cloud of hop mater in the mill. They would dig it out between production runs. More Beer sells varieties of Hop Hash, but are just about out.

They also might clean out the pelletize room between runs. Denny might know if that is the case.

11
Ingredients / Re: hop hash
« on: December 03, 2016, 07:05:22 AM »
I think I just bought out the rest of the hops hash from this site. It would only let me order 3 total quantity.
Will that be used for a lot of small batch experiments?

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: WLP029 Kolsch yeast Strain
« on: December 02, 2016, 09:44:00 AM »
Another thing to consider is how the beer was stored. I have had bottled beer show signs of diacetyl after only a couple of days at warmish temp (80 degrees) while beer that was stored cold showed no signs. Oxidation during bottle can cause diacetyl if the precursor is present.
Exactly what I was going to say. I have had it happen, and had a bottle set aside so I could check after reading the sheets, and yes, it had diacetyl. The keg was still fine.

Diacetyl? I have a high threshold. I get it in a beer at high levels, but I often let the other judge comment on that, unless I detect a slick mouthfeel, or taste "butter".


13
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Chemistry question
« on: December 01, 2016, 07:47:14 PM »
RO or distilled water will have a pH of less than 7 due RO CO2 defusing in, and forming carbonic acid.

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 01, 2016, 01:22:32 PM »
See below

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46Y6wdj65q0&feature=share
I thought that was what you had in mind. Would have to be at the stoichiometric ratio, not lean.

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