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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: water talk
« on: Today at 09:07:11 AM »
This one is cheap, reliable and measures to .01g .  I use it for hops and water salts.


http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-0-01g-Digital-Scale/dp/B0012LOQUQ
That is what I use. Wow, that is a good price. Do I need a spare?

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: Adding Dark Grains During Vorlauf
« on: Today at 09:03:46 AM »
Gordon uses RO water adjusted to 5.5, and gypsum and/or CaCl2 in the mash. That is his procedure, so adding at vorlauf avoids acrid beers.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: February 05, 2016, 01:50:36 PM »
Thinking of an Wnglish bitter, once some fermenters are freed up.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Repackaging from 22 oz bottles
« on: February 05, 2016, 11:28:54 AM »
If you have some CO2 purge the bottles.  If not I would try to fill from the bottom.  Maybe attach your wand to a funnel.  I would put my cap on and invert the bottle and hold it tight.  Cap on the foam and your fine.  I would do this as close to shipping to the comp as possible.  I've done this before years ago.  It will work, good luck on the entry.
Good advice, keep as much air out as you can. Make sure the 22 ozbottle is cold, and the the 12 oz bottle is cold to avoid foaming.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: water talk
« on: February 05, 2016, 06:51:32 AM »
It will be fun and cool, but how do u measure sub milligram worth of salts? Considering that you seldom go above 10-12 grams of any one salt for a full 5 gallon.
You can dissolve them in a small amount of water to a known, then dose it using a syringe.
+1

I assume this will have many samples to be tasted. As said, use the minerals in a liter or 2 of water and add to beers, or pour a pitcher of beer and dose that quantity. For an IPA I use a lot of gypsum, say 5 grams for 20 liters to keep the numbers easy. So for a one liter sample, that rate is 0.25 grams, and my gram scale goes down to 0.01 grams, so no problem.

6
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Hop Slam 2016
« on: February 04, 2016, 08:24:06 PM »
On draft at my local it had low aromatics and was hot. Let me say that place has good line cleaning, and beers are always in good shape.

I had some in Kalamazoo from a can less tha a week later. Very nice hop aroma, smooth with no heat.

Larry Bell has said they made >10,000 bbls. They have 50 and 200 bbl systems in Galesburg. Does one think they all are the same?


I don't have a big problem with the variation, Jeff. What I should've said more clearly is that my tastes have changed more than anything. Even the Hopslam with great hop character (the norm) is overly dextrinous to me and more like an American barleywine (like Dan said), a style that I like. I just have a hard time having more than one now.
More the higher ABV for me.

7
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Hop Slam 2016
« on: February 04, 2016, 07:44:08 PM »
On draft at my local it had low aromatics and was hot. Let me say that place has good line cleaning, and beers are always in good shape.

I had some in Kalamazoo from a can less tha a week later. Very nice hop aroma, smooth with no heat.

Larry Bell has said they made >10,000 bbls. They have 50 and 200 bbl systems in Galesburg. Does one think they all are the same?

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: water talk
« on: February 04, 2016, 08:33:45 AM »
John Palmer did a talk some years back where he brewed a pale beer with a pale profile and a dark profile, and a dark beer with both of those profiles. The samples showed what the correct water could do.

You might do the same by doctoring a pale beer to have a higher pH, and doctoring a dark beer to have a low pH.

Thanks, that should cover pH. How about the salts?

If you have a beer that you know the levels of SO4 and Cl, use gypsum and CaCl2 to dose samples with each to the maximum recommeced, or more. Have an undoctored sample as a control that they can go back to. So have a control, max SO4, max Cl to show what those do.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: water talk
« on: February 04, 2016, 07:42:07 AM »
John Palmer did a talk some years back where he brewed a pale beer with a pale profile and a dark profile, and a dark beer with both of those profiles. The samples showed what the correct water could do.

You might do the same by doctoring a pale beer to have a higher pH, and doctoring a dark beer to have a low pH.

10
Ingredients / Re: Weyermann Barke malts
« on: February 03, 2016, 06:10:41 PM »
So, what I'm  hearing is it's basically the "maris otter" of German barley? (Not in flavor, but in essence.)
Yes, but only 20 years old. Not 1960s old like MO. Not 1820s old like Chevallier - dang that was a tasty beer at Bell's.

11
Ingredients / Re: Weyermann Barke malts
« on: February 03, 2016, 01:05:03 PM »
On the tour last Nov. they talked about Barke and its low color and superior flavor. It is a heratige malt from way back in 1996!

Another is Steffi, that Sierra Nevada had in their Oktoberfest last fall.

Barke is in here, Steffi is not. Form the Brewing Malt Society - my translation.
http://www.braugerstengemeinschaft.de/admin/ImageServer.php?download=true&ID=f3179a183@braugerstengemeinschaft

I had read that on the train from Frankfurt to Bamberg. I even stayed awake.

12
It looks like both you and Ron Pattinson are correct about the additional sugars being allowed in top-fermented beer, not bottom-fermented beer.

Here's the link to the actual document Ron is referring to in his piece that you linked (the text is from The Provisional Beer Act of 1993):

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://faolex.fao.org/docs/texts/ger98843.doc&prev=search

But the original text from 1906 basically states the same thing here:

https://de.wikisource.org/wiki/Bekanntmachung,_betreffend_die_Fassung_des_Brausteuergesetzes

(original German)

Unfortunately, it seems that Horst Dornbush and Karl-Ullrich Heyse's entry in The Oxford Companion to Beer (pp. 692-693) is incorrect.  Here's what they wrote: "The German version [of the Reinheitsgebot], on the other hand, is slightly more lenient when it comes to bottom-fermented beers.  These may also be made with the addition of "technically pure cane sugar, beet sugar, invert sugar, and modified starch sugar, as well as coloring agents made from these sugars.""
Time to throw Horst under the Bus? Again?

If that was your article, I learned some things. I still liked it.

Edit - Pattinson is darned good on beer history. I will go by what he has to say on German beer. He travels through Germany often, and his wife is a German lady, so he has some command of the language.

Edit 2 - I know some German, travel fairly often, but am not as fluent as I would like to be.

13
Ingredients / Re: chit, spitz, carapils and carafoam
« on: February 01, 2016, 06:55:33 PM »
It is sprouted enough so that it meets the RHG. It is so under modified, it is almost an adjunct. Bottom of the page.

With that said, my comment regarding the use of flaked barley becomes more salient. Why go to the trouble of sourcing chit malt when it is a less strong version (beta glucan wise) of raw barley? Flaked barley is a gelatanized version of raw barley.

I might have to revisit using a small amount of flaked barley in some of my Pilsners. When I started brewing Pilsners Jeff Renner gave me the advice that a small % of flaked would emulate Chit. Used that for a while, can't really say why I stopped.


Jeff, I've been using around 2% flaked barley in pale beers for about a year FWIW. It contributes to good foam with little impact on flavor at that %. I definitely don't see chit as any improvement on that and it's tougher to source than flaked barley.
That is the advice I got from Jeff Renner about 10 years back when there was no Chit Malt available.

14
Ingredients / Re: chit, spitz, carapils and carafoam
« on: February 01, 2016, 06:17:24 PM »
It is sprouted enough so that it meets the RHG. It is so under modified, it is almost an adjunct. Bottom of the page.

With that said, my comment regarding the use of flaked barley becomes more salient. Why go to the trouble of sourcing chit malt when it is a less strong version (beta glucan wise) of raw barley? Flaked barley is a gelatanized version of raw barley.

I might have to revisit using a small amount of flaked barley in some of my Pilsners. When I started brewing Pilsners Jeff Renner gave me the advice that a small % of flaked would emulate Chit. Used that for a while, can't really say why I stopped.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: hop stand exbeeriment
« on: February 01, 2016, 12:13:01 PM »
Stan Hieronymus stated at Hop School, you get differences depending on whirlpool temperature. He acknowledged the flame out and 170 additions being popular. He recommended that homebrewers should try a stand at 185F, as some pros have found that to accentuate a flavor/aroma compound - which I forget which one that is and if he recommended certain hops for that one.

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