Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 554
1
All Grain Brewing / Re: Adjusting my RO Water
« on: July 22, 2017, 01:06:36 PM »
Would it hurt to add 1/2 a campden tablet to my RO water just as a precaution?   ;l
RO systems have a carbon filter element to remove chlorine and chloramines, cause chlorine will eat through the membrane, rendering the filter ineffective. So you don't need it for RO.

2
Roughly 7.25 lbs of dry hops per barrel.

Melvin responded, "that is how it should look".

I have read that some breweries are using 4-5 lbs per barrel in their NEIPA. This is on another level. They are going to lose a lot of product to absorption. Those are expensive hops too, so do they distribute this (never had a Melvin beer)?

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mashtun question
« on: July 20, 2017, 07:37:11 AM »
Efficiancy will suffer, as the wort will be drawn mostly from the first place, and high quality wort will be left behind at the others.

4
The Pub / Re: Tipping ettiquite
« on: July 19, 2017, 06:59:35 PM »
A niece talked about her pay and tips years back when she was working for a chain restaurant that was known for ribs, her story was for the one she worked at, not sure all were that way.

She preferred the tips in cash. She could give the bus boys their cut and have the money at the end of the shift. Her base pay was crap, tips made it up, and she hustled.

Put it on the credit card and total it up with the bill? That went into a pool. It was split with all the servers. If someone was slacking off, they got the same cut. Another kicker was that the restaurant held the credit card tip until the end of the month, then they got their cut. She never complained about the taxes.

We tip in cash, whenever possible. We get thanked now and then.

These days 20% seems ok for good service. Sometimes we do less if it is really,really bad.

When in Germany, we just round up. The servers are paid a living wage. They have often gone to school for their job. It was impressive to see them rattle off what everyone had at a table for food and drink, total it up, and hand you the bill on the spot. Then they made change out of the purse on their belt. Rounding up makes it faster, and if you had great service, throw in a Euro or two more.


5
A single rest at 153F will span both alpha and beta ranges and  will be sufficient for 95+% of your brewing. That said, the best way to know what a particular rest will do is to try it for yourself. It's not going to ruin a beer.

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk

I have to disagree here. β will be largely inactive at 153 °F. If you are going to choose a single infusion rest temperature, I'd say you are better served choosing a lower temperature.

In the end, single infusion mashing is a very useful compromise, especially given the fact that some people cannot direct fire step mash. Set aside esoteric flavor discussions and the "better or worse" argument between step mashing and single infusion. The true beauty of the step mash is how it gives complete control of the wort composition to the brewer.

One of the greatest overviews I have seen came from an article of Brauwelt that detailed a multi step mash. It talked about ideal β rest temperatures and times, particularly the half life of β amylase at those temperatures:

144 °F (20 minutes gives ~ 46% of β amylase activity)

147 °F for (10 minutes gives ~25% additional of β amylase activity while 10 more minutes here gives ~10% additional β amylase activity)

153 °F (20 minutes. By the time you enter this rest there is no residual β amylase activity, although the ramp from 147 °F to 153 °F will likely net an additional 5% β amylase activity)

162 °F (30 minute α amylase rest. This promotes full body)

171 °F (10 minute mashout promotes glycoproteins and other foam positive substances)

A nice compromise would be 144 °F for 18-20 minutes, 147 °F for 8-10 minutes, Step through 153 °F on the way to 162 °F where you rest for 30 minutes then mashout for 10 minutes at 171 °F.

For a single infusion, a temperature between 147-150 °F may be ideal.

IIRC both Greg Doss (when he was at Wyeast) and Kai both reported maximum fermentabily for single infusion mashes at 153F using Pils Malt. That is what I remember, haven't looked at those in some time. Greg presented at an NHC, so you might find that on the NHC page.

Your thoughts? I have have had good results on certain beers using a single at 153F. US 2-row is so "hot" in DP that big breweries say the mash is pretty much converted when they are done mashing in 200 bbls. For some malts I see where a step mash is they way to go, for US malts, not so much.

6
Beer Travel / Re: San Francisco Breweries
« on: July 16, 2017, 07:11:17 AM »
The Anchor tour was very good when we did it years back. There are many new ones I don't have experience with. One is Cellarmaker which gets good reviews.

It dawned on me the other day that I haven't been to SF in years. We always had a good time at the Toronado. Magnolia is up the hill.



7
Beer Recipes / Re: Altbier
« on: July 14, 2017, 11:22:19 AM »
I guess I'm going for a malt forward Alt with some spice and very subtle stonefruit. I want good head retention and medium body. I've adjust my grist bill to be:

8.75# German Pils
2# Munich
1# Caramunich
.25# Carafa I

After changing the Grist bill significantly I'm sitting at:

1.060 OG
38.3 IBUs
16.1 SRM
6.1% est. ABV

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

Just out of curiosity, where are you hoping to get stonefruit from?

The Hersbrucker dry hops? Or am I incorrect of that assessment?
That OG and dry hops look like a Sticke Alt (secret Alt released twice a year).

For that I would use 30% or more Munich.

I don't think Hersbrucker will give stone fruit. Worth a try.
https://ychhops.com/varieties/hersbrucker

8
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Beergun or alternative?
« on: July 14, 2017, 09:02:11 AM »
I was at the LHBS yesterday and saw they had another beer gun brand that looked pretty nice. I cannot remember the name...

I am starting to go back to bottle conditioning for prolonged shelf life. I normally keg but if I bottle; I will use the beer gun when I will consume in relatively short order or bottle condition when I plan to let it sit for a while. My only issue is less clear beers from settled yeast.

I have had some horribly oxidized beers when using the beer gun but some of that has to do with the user...

At HBC there was a talk where they had actual measurements of the Packaged O2, and the beergun is capable of low levels. There was some spread in those data points, one or two were fairly high. The speaker that did the filling said he was just filling the bottles, sipping beer capping bottles, and said he was maybe too relaxed.having some live yeast is a good thing.

9
Beer Recipes / Re: Altbier
« on: July 14, 2017, 08:57:31 AM »
Here is the recipe I have saved for Zum Uerige on my system. If you search you can find more detail in older threads. The grain and hop amounts might be slightly different.

I always assumed that Alts consisted of high percentages of Munich malt. If I was to brew my own I would still include at least 20% out of personal preference.

96.25% pilsner
2.5% caramunich III
1.25% carafa III

20 g Mittelfruh 6.5% 60 min
13 g Perle 7.5% 60 min
32 g Spalt 5% 20 min
(With the exception of Perle, I don't get hops with that high of a AA% so I need to use more)

OG 1.049
FG 1.009
~43 IBU
~10 SRM

WY1007
Zum Uerige is my favorite, but it has the least malt flavor and the most bitterness.

Brewtopalonian, Schlüssel and Schumacher have mor Munich malt character. You could google Jamils Cowboy Alt to get something in the way of Schlüssel.

You can go higher on the Munich if you want.

10
Beer Recipes / Re: Altbier
« on: July 14, 2017, 06:35:13 AM »
That is doing to be one malty Altbier, more like a Northern German Alt than a Duesseldorfer Alt. Is there a certain commercial Alt you are trying to make? The reason I ask is that you can make a 100% Munich malt Altbier if you want, and it will be a nice beer (I think I did one of those years back). The trick is to get enough bitterness to balance the finish.

Yourhop selections are good.

As for the water and Reinheitsgebot, you will still be in the RHG. It just says "water", not what type of water. German Brewers treat their water. CaCl2 and Gypsum are allowed and used.
Awesome, this is great feedback guys!  I don't have a particular Altbier that I'm trying to recreate.  The purpose of this is to create a beer within the standards of the style guidelines and come out with a great drinkable beer that I created.  I guess that's always the idea. I'm just getting into recipe creation and this is a good learning tool for me.

That said, what base malt might you recommend so that I don't have too much "malt" flavor?

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

German Pils Malt would be my choice for the base. Use Munich malt in the 30-40% range. Maybe 5-7.5% specialty malts (caramunich and color malts).

Zum Uerige uses no Munich malt. Pils, A smidge of caraMunich, and color Malt. They do have an involved mash schedule.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Altbier
« on: July 14, 2017, 05:45:03 AM »
That is doing to be one malty Altbier, more like a Northern German Alt than a Duesseldorfer Alt. Is there a certain commercial Alt you are trying to make? The reason I ask is that you can make a 100% Munich malt Altbier if you want, and it will be a nice beer (I think I did one of those years back). The trick is to get enough bitterness to balance the finish.

Yourhop selections are good.

As for the water and Reinheitsgebot, you will still be in the RHG. It just says "water", not what type of water. German Brewers treat their water. CaCl2 and Gypsum are allowed and used.


12
The long tubing gives a pressure drop that lessens the foam. Have everything cold, including the beergun. If the bottles are cold and wet that also helps.

13
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Cost of a Sixer?
« on: July 13, 2017, 08:47:25 AM »
At a huge place like New Belgium it might be easier for them to feed all four into the drop packer and load them at once, but we basically have to do 12 packs of all four and then rearrange them by hand.

I saw the guys at Sierra Nevada's Asheville facility packing the mixers by hand.  lots o labor...
Some of the mixed packs have bottles and cans. Lot of hand labor involved for that.

14
Beer Recipes / Re: Golden Ale Recipe
« on: July 10, 2017, 05:55:50 PM »
Are you sure the IBU is 2? That's not even enough to provide antibacterial effect. I'm not even sure that's enough to clear federal minimums for hopping rates. (Not a concern for homebrew but for the brewery that inspired you.)
The have hoping rates based on 7.5 Lbs/100 barrels. No IBU requirement.

Edit doing the math shows that would be ~0.2 Oz for a 5 gallon batch.

Edit 2 - the brewery may have really low AA Strisselspalt.

It just dawned on me, the brewery could also add the required amount of hops late and get the low IBU.

Im going to mess around with it in beer smith and see what I can do. I enjoy creating a recipe as much as brewing it. I get a lot of satisfaction in that.
The TTB requirement comes to 0.2 Oz for 5 gallons. Plug that in at later times, using the AA you have, and see where it hits 2. It might be at 20, 15, 10 minutes, or whatever.

Let us know what you decide.

15
Beer Recipes / Re: Golden Ale Recipe
« on: July 10, 2017, 04:52:10 PM »
Are you sure the IBU is 2? That's not even enough to provide antibacterial effect. I'm not even sure that's enough to clear federal minimums for hopping rates. (Not a concern for homebrew but for the brewery that inspired you.)
The have hoping rates based on 7.5 Lbs/100 barrels. No IBU requirement.

Edit doing the math shows that would be ~0.2 Oz for a 5 gallon batch.

Edit 2 - the brewery may have really low AA Strisselspalt.

It just dawned on me, the brewery could also add the required amount of hops late and get the low IBU.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 554