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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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16
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Reconfirm: I HATE White Labs new packaging
« on: February 14, 2018, 06:26:30 AM »
Could a cheap, small pasta roller be put to use squeezing out the yeast? It would then go from a unitasker to multitasker.

17
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Reconfirm: I HATE White Labs new packaging
« on: February 13, 2018, 05:28:37 PM »
Toothpaste is exactly what I thought on the first time with WLP-002 in the pure pitch. Now I make sure to work it up a little first.

18
Ingredients / Re: Cane/Corn vs In The Raw Sugar
« on: February 11, 2018, 10:03:30 PM »
There beer pring sugar calculators that will give you options for various sugar sources.
Google beer priming calculators.

19
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Aspiring brewer, new to forum
« on: February 11, 2018, 02:26:19 AM »
From what I have learned about water so far, and I admit it isn't a whole lot, my local water supply might be better suited to some of the darker ales, stouts, porters etc. My water is fairly hard and alkaline. If I were to brew a pils, for example, I imagine I would have to use another source, either purchased or treated with an RO unit. From what I have been reading, my water may, or may not be fine as far as mash extraction efficiency without modifications to chemistry. Seems the only way to determine that is to try. I'm somewhat comforted by the fact a renowned local brewery, Russian River, uses my city water. What they do to it after it comes from the pipe, if anything, I have no idea.

 I still don't know what particular mashing method I'll go with. BIAB appears simpler with fewer vessels to dance with, but for doing a full up 5 gallon brew means handling and moving a fairly large kettle with a considerable weight in hot water/wort unless you are set up with pumps which adds to the complexity. A chiller looks to be a pretty simple piece of gear to make, and I have some large galvie tubs to hold ice water.

E-mail Russian River asking for advice on how to use the water for your homebrew. You just might get a reply from Vinnie. He has been very homebrewer friendly.

20
Jim might like this.

On our Grand Canyon trip our guide said she would look for the toungues of water in the rapids and avoid where it was churned up. “You don’t float on foam!”

21
All Grain Brewing / Re: Bru'n Water pH off
« on: February 11, 2018, 01:11:09 AM »
I've long reported: wort pH varies during the mashing period. The other thing that is curious (in my experience), is that the pH tends to drift toward a room-temp pH of about 5.4 during the mash. If the pH is initially higher than 5.4, it tends to fall and if initially lower, it tends to rise.  I can't explain it, but it has proven typical in my experience.
Brewed a APA yeasterday. Hit the predicted value of 5.30 on the nose. Later, it came in at 5.38 before mashout.

22
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 10, 2018, 11:07:59 PM »
I'll also say that I had a two hearted recently and thought "Wow, this is malty."  So it a) either wasn't very fresh, or b) my tastes have moved towards less (or no) crystal malt in an IPA.  Either way, I don't see how a typical NEIPA would taste sweet, except for the ones that go for the extreme "no bitterness" end of the spectrum due to the balance.  But still, I'd think they finish at a lower gravity than the old school American IPAs like Two Hearted.

A friend sent me a Two Heated maybe 15+ years ago.  At that time, I thought "what's all the hype about?".  Just didn't seem all that hoppy.  I had the same reaction to Hop Devil (as did my wife) and Hop Slam.

Agreed there are hoppier IPAs than Two Hearted. Hopslam always seems to have a lot of variation, sometimes it is not hoppy, other times it has hops in abundance.

23
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 10, 2018, 05:59:58 PM »
I'll also say that I had a two hearted recently and thought "Wow, this is malty."  So it a) either wasn't very fresh, or b) my tastes have moved towards less (or no) crystal malt in an IPA.  Either way, I don't see how a typical NEIPA would taste sweet, except for the ones that go for the extreme "no bitterness" end of the spectrum due to the balance.  But still, I'd think they finish at a lower gravity than the old school American IPAs like Two Hearted.
I get fresh Two Hearted often. It is more balanced than a West Coast IPA, but the bitterness is there, and the aromatics are really nice. NEIPA is all aroma and flavor, not much in the finish, I don’t like the mouthfeel or the astringency that many have.

I have never had a Trillium or Treehouse. The true NEIPA may be out there.

24
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: February 10, 2018, 01:59:26 AM »
Today I did an easy 5 gallon batch, part in the kitchen to stay warm, boil in the garage. Several snow shoveling sessions were interspersed with brewing. The Beer was a Pale Ale, Featuring Mandarina Bavaria hops.

25
Homebrewer Bios / Re: From Arizona
« on: February 10, 2018, 01:55:47 AM »
Welcome, Northern AZ has some fond memories.

26
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 10:48:39 PM »
I think we're witnessing an evolution of the style.  Not to say the style we've historically come to love and enjoy is evolving, but a new breed of IPA's is coming into fruit-ition (lol...no pun intended).  It's becoming hip.  There are so many breweries moving toward this new-found style, and the beer consumer seems to be embracing them.  It's hard for me to wrap my brain around this trend or fad or...., but it's definitely happening.  Love it or leave it....it's reality.

I think a few cans just exploded as I was typing this post.  ;D

Glad to see you checking in, Ron.

27
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 03:25:14 AM »
I'm drinking a very nice pils right now, and cold-crashing a IIPA.  ACTUALLY, it's not a pils.  It's a pilsner-ale brewed with WLP029 and homegrown Sterling hops.  So now all of the pilsner freaks can tell me the error of my ways.  But, it's clean and clear and delicious, and I really don't care if it's not the ultimate "IT" pilsner.

Honestly, I'm not posting much anymore because this board (and the homebrewing community in general, as gauged by this forum) is becoming a bit too polarized for me.  A few years ago, everybody was all crazy with the IPAs, and it was like a competition to brew the ultimate.  Now the needle has swung to the polar opposite of IPA and everyone is obsessed with brewing the lightest and cleanest beer possible. 

Whatever happened to moderation, exploration, and inclusiveness?  I can enjoy a well-brewed IPA as much as a pilsner.  I think it gets to be a pissing contest of who can throw down the most obscure knowledge, and it's alienating in a sense. 

We've all advanced as brewers, and the discussion has advanced quite a bit in terms of complexity, but we've lost a lot of the joy in brewing, it seems.  Jim had it right when he posted about going back to the heart of brewing.  I'm sick of hearing about pils and LODO and German brewing texts.  And I feel like I can brew whatever the heck I want regardless of what the trend is.  People are getting too cliquish and deep in their own rabbit-holes.

Have a great day, fellas, sorry for raining on your parade.  I guess I just hit my breaking point.

You can make a great beer/Pilsner with a clean yeast
 and Sterling hops. Two thumbs up.

28
Ingredients / Re: Eureka - the best new hop since Mosaic
« on: February 09, 2018, 02:16:06 AM »
So you are saying that Eureka hops made you say “Eureka?”. Couldn’t resist that temptation.

 I might have to get some based on that.

29
All Grain Brewing / Re: How is Munich malt made?
« on: February 08, 2018, 03:23:03 AM »
Yeah, I love the taste of Munich but it only has a diastatic power of 40-50 Lintner depending on which kind you get. Adding a bit of highly modified malt will help your conversion a lot.
40-50 linter is about what British pale ale malt has, 35 is plenty to convert a mash. Moreover, it has been 50+ years since you could find a Munich with  questionable enzymes (note conversion times on spec sheets are in line with other base malts), just like Pils that needs a protein rest; these are myths perpetuated in the homebrew community. Decoction is almost a unicorn even with Dunkels, but would be the only place Pils would be appropriate; not for the enzyme package with available malts, but to LIGHTEN the color and flavor.  So for homebrewers, the takeaway is, go Munich and color and have no fear!

EDIT  Jeff, I wonder if the brewer you talked to was also influenced by tradition more than the current state of materials?

He is a degreed brewer. His brewery is known for a Dunkel. I have been under the impression that traditional Dunkels were all dark Munich and decocted, if you go back far enough, before Pils malt.

There is a 19th century Dunkel recipe in the Jan-Feb 2018 New Brewer that uses:

45.5 % Munich
35% Vienna
10% CaraMunich I
8% Weyermann Special W
1.5% Carafa Special I

Traditional or modern? The article as authored by Horst Dornbusch and Thomas Kraus-Weyermann. That last guy might be the authority. I still need to look up Special W.
Special W is something like Special B. One is Weyernmann and the other is Castle.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks, Leos.

30
Beer Travel / Re: Berlin
« on: February 08, 2018, 02:38:24 AM »
My wife and I will be in Berlin for 4 days in mid-May, then off to Prague and Vienna. When will you be there?

Dave Carpenter, the Zymurgy editor, lives in Berlin. I sent him an email and got a reply about breweries he recommends. I'll try to dig it up in the next few days and pass on his recommendations.
Mid/late August.

I was going to contact Dave for a meet up beer or three. Why I didn’t  Think to ask him first? He was notified by Gary Glass that I was looking for info (thanks Gary), but with the time difference, and that he is on vacation, some time may pass. I have plenty of time until our trip.

Berlin is such a dynamic city for Germany. The city has been remaking itself since the wall came down. The changes since my visit in 2002will be disorienting.

We spent time on Museum Island before, but construction had many closed. The Pergamon was open, and it was just WOW. The Humbolt University Nature Museum is world class if you are into minerals and fossils.


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