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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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16
I applied for one, will have to wait now and see if I get selected.

17
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Good Hops Deal
« on: November 28, 2016, 12:48:46 PM »
Also, you get a free 3mL Hop Shot with every order. The 3mL size is really convenient for my smaller batch sizes, so I find myself using it a lot more often since they've started carrying it at YVH.

Oh, and sorry for buying the last pack of Hop Hash...
They loaded more in, which is nice. I had procrastinated, but still lucked out and got some.

18
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« on: November 27, 2016, 06:55:34 AM »
I know that I'm a bit late to the conversation, but I wanted to chime in on a few things.

I use 34/70 quite a bit. I have fermented it using traditional lager fermentation schedules, accelerated lager schedules, and ale-like fermentations at temps anywhere from the mid 50's to the mid 60's. I have never gotten a lemon flavor from it. As a matter of fact, I find that 34/70 mutes lemon character from hops like Sterling, Motueka, Kazbek, etc. - varieties that give distinct citrus character with other yeasts.

I can't refute that LODO could have something to do with it, as I have yet to incorporate that in the hot side. One other thing that comes to mind is that if the LODO brewers that get this character are using saurgut, maybe the yeast is somehow enhancing the lemony, Berliner Weisse character from the acid fermentation rather than producing this during fermentation.

I have also noticed the lack of sulfur production from dry lager strains. While I don't want my beer to smell like eggs, there are certain beers where I prefer just a whiff of sulfur on the nose. I have used 34/70 on several occasions in my Märzen, and it makes a damn good beer, but when I use 2633 it leaves a subtle sulfur note on the nose that takes it to the next level.

Regarding S-189, I have only used it once, using an accelerated lager fermentation schedule, and I wasn't a fan of the results. It was kind of muddled, with some fusel alcohol notes. If I used it again, I'd be sure to stick to a traditional low & slow lager fermentation.

And yes, 34/70 finishes crisp enough for a pilsner, but WY2278 is even crisper. 2278 is the only yeast I'll use for a hoppy lager like an IPL. Every other lager strain I've used tends to strip some late hop character (especially fruitier varietals), even 34/70.
Interesting comment on the 2278 in a Pils. I have used it in a Czech Pils, trying to do a PU clone, but that was a split batch that I blended back together, using the D and H strain, to do what they used to do. Now they just use the H strain from what I have read. I will split a batch of German Pils with 830 and 2278 and see which I like best.

19
Beer Recipes / Re: British Golden Ale
« on: November 27, 2016, 06:47:20 AM »
This style seems to be pretty Americanized... How is this just not a less bitter APA? I would think that a requirement must be at very least an English ale strain?

If I was attempting one, I would also most likely use Golden Promise as the base, maybe some flaked corn for adjunct, and a small amount of light crystal along with a touch of character malt (biscuist, victory, munich, etc).
Maybe a blend of english and american hops, and english yeast.
Otherwise, to me, it becomes pretty much a hoppy american blonde or less bitter APA. Just my 2 cents.

These days, a lot of golden ales in British pubs are mid Atlantic in style, with American hops, but if you want to avoid those I'd use Styrian Goldings. The problem with most British hops is that the aroma is subtle and can fade during conditioning, giving you an insipid beer.

Golden ales are weaker than APAs at about 4%, less well carbonated, probably a lot more sulphate in the water, less bitter than APA but more bitter than American blonde. Definitely no crystal or caramel malt - that will give you bitter rather than golden ale. 100% Golden Promise or Maris Otter would work. Yeast a matter of personal preference but not Danstar Nottingham, which is too tart and lagery.

I agree on all of your points. I want to add that some use American hops that are Hallertau Mittelfrüh derivatives, such as Liberty or Mt. Hood. Not over the top American hops can give a hint of citrus, but have lager like aromas.

20
Beer Recipes / Re: British Golden Ale
« on: November 25, 2016, 06:31:07 PM »
I would use Simpsons Golden Promise, maybe the Fullers strain, get a little mineral character in the water, but not too much, and the hops of your choice.

I have had a few, they are good drinkers. Having been to Britain in 2015, I noted ones with British, American, German, NZ and AU hops (I said that on my last BJCP and probably got docked).

Make the beer you want to drink.

21
Beer Recipes / Re: English/east coast apa thoughts
« on: November 25, 2016, 05:29:01 PM »
Welcome to the forum.

You might be surprised at the amount of ales in Britain that use American and German hops. I have had a few.

One thing to think about is to get a British mineral profile going for the water. That and the yeast can get you there.

22
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Vintage
« on: November 25, 2016, 05:25:04 PM »
I think you should take it on Antique Roadshow.
+1. If they have someone that can appraise old beer in a special bottle!

23
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Vintage
« on: November 25, 2016, 04:15:05 PM »
It would not be worth as much if you drink it, the experience of drinking it would be wretched. Theo SE beers were not made to last, heck I remember the old man drinking Meisterbrau, and it was cheap stuff back then (he liked cheap beer). Smart money sells sell it as a collectible.

24
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« on: November 25, 2016, 11:55:40 AM »
While the dry do start out life as the liquid strain equivalents, they don't really exhibit the same properties.
Actually the dry yeasts don't start out as the liquid equivalent and neither do the different brands of liquid yeasts.  They are often different isolates of the same strain which explains why they have slightly different characteristics.  Man I miss having Mark on the forum.

So 34/70 isn't based off of 34/70, nor is 830, or 2124?


Actually, 34/70 is the 70th isolate of station 34. There is a product on Hefebank Weihenstephan's page that is 34/78, which is less flocculant, but has many of the same attributes.

The Chico strains are all a little different, as they are different isolates. Sierra Nevada says what they are using today is a little different. The Chico strain came from Seidel as BRY-96, the Ballantine Beer strain.

Yeah, I miss Mark's wisdom too.

25
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Belgian breweries low oxygen?
« on: November 25, 2016, 09:40:53 AM »
Chimay uses the Meura mash filter system.  I can't think of a more oxygen rich mash system.  Grist hammers to pulverize the grain to a powder, which then gets loaded into the filters.  We all know what excellent beer Chimay produces.  It's just not used in big Belgian beers with Belgian yeast.  Even Coors Light is made with a Meura mash filter system. Not sure this low oxygen mash is real issue.

One of the most missed points is that LARGENESS of the brewery(batch sizes) basically automatically makes it Low oxygen. The larger the brewery, the lower oxygen it is(naturally by doing nothing).

At what size do you consider a brewery to be large? I know it would be a curve decreasing with size, but where would the knee in the curve be?

26
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« on: November 24, 2016, 04:06:25 AM »
Thanks all. The goal of the thread was strictly to inquire about the differences between 34/70 and 189.

I have accepted that I am a lower tier of brewer because I don't employ LODO techniques or liquid yeast on most occasions. I get it...
Brew the way you are comfortable brewing. Brew the way you can on your system. If you brew beer you like, you can be happy.

27
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« on: November 23, 2016, 08:50:58 PM »
I generally think pf 189 as more for malty styles and 34/70 for styles that don't have as much body.  Both are equally easy to use and reliable.  I think for a schwarz I'd go with the 34/70.

The last beer I used 34/70 on (pilsner) I got 84% attenuation and the last S-189 I used (maibock which got my second highest score ever) got 79%.
Yes on the Schwarz with 34/70.

So you agree that 189 is better suited for maltier lagers as well?

Yes.
Hurlimann used to brew Samichlaus. That is a Malty beer.  :o



Bet they didn't brew it with the dry equivalent of their yeast! ;D. Sorry had to.

No they didn't. i do find that some strains are close enough to use in a pinch. That is based on ale strains though.

28
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« on: November 23, 2016, 05:23:14 PM »
I generally think pf 189 as more for malty styles and 34/70 for styles that don't have as much body.  Both are equally easy to use and reliable.  I think for a schwarz I'd go with the 34/70.

The last beer I used 34/70 on (pilsner) I got 84% attenuation and the last S-189 I used (maibock which got my second highest score ever) got 79%.
Yes on the Schwarz with 34/70.

So you agree that 189 is better suited for maltier lagers as well?

Yes.
Hurlimann used to brew Samichlaus. That is a Malty beer.  :o

29
The Pub / Re: New hop field next door
« on: November 23, 2016, 05:20:12 PM »
I saw the picture.

We drove up to the Traverse City area for my wife's birthday. Went by a new field south of town on the way up. Leaving for home, we drove by a new 200 acre field on M-72, probably the biggest in MI by far.

30
Ingredients / Re: Your favorite malt and hop of the year.
« on: November 23, 2016, 05:17:42 PM »
I had a beer made at Bell's with Chevallier malt from Crisp. The variety is about 200 years old. The beer was open fermented in the old Stroh's wooden vats. It was bready, like a really good baguette, with some walnut paste lightly spread on it. I loved it.
Good luck finding some of that. Crisp only contracts very limited acres. I wish I could find a bag of that.

There's the rub, finding any even if it is still being grown.
There are limited acres, so not much available. Crisp contacted Bell's, as John Mallett's Malt book had come out a little earlier. A Bell's employee I know said they got malt samples from everywhere after the book was published. Most were small samples, not enough to brew a batch with.

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