Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 390
16
The Pub / Oscar Blues Buys Perrin Brewing in MI
« on: March 27, 2015, 01:05:30 PM »
This was a surprise. We spent a very long day at Perrin last June sorting entries for the second round of NHC. Some of the beers were very good, some I was not so impressed with. The guy who started it made a large fortune manufacturing sports wear. Did he make his small fortune, and it was time to get out?  :D They had bought a Krones bottling line, but never used it as they did not have the brand identity to get shelf space. Kuhnhenn has that line now.

http://www.mlive.com/business/west-michigan/index.ssf/2015/03/oskar_blues_perrin_brew.html

17
From something I picked up on the old HBD back in the late 90s early 2000s timeframe, as to mix a campden tablet into the mash. The SO2 is an antioxidant that inhibits the oxidation of the malt compounds that lead to stalling. Any remaining SO2 is driven off in the boil.

I experimented with this for over a year.  I finally stopped when I saw no difference.  To me, that meant that either it didn't work or I didn't have the problem to solve in the first place.

Not much work to put it in. Then again, sometimes it gets missed, no difference.

I do like to do it for the Helles and Pilsners. Those are good until late summer/fall if they last that long.

18
I haven't factored Campden tablets into the chemical mix, since I use RO, but how would one account for a tablet in the mash under the Brunwater spreadsheet.  I am sensitive to water being chemically balanced and fear any changes, unless they are justified.  Longer storage life is not an issue with my friends.

I use RO, don't notice any problems, but have not A-B it on the same recipe.

19
There is also a lot of evidence that hot side aeration is not an issue in homebrew.  http://brulosophy.com/2014/11/18/is-hot-side-aeration-fact-or-fiction-exbeeriment-results/
Dr. Bramforth has said a good healthy fermentation takes care of HSA, so don't worry about it.

20
The Pub / Re: The Craft Beer Quiz
« on: March 27, 2015, 08:17:19 AM »
See how well you know your stuff with the 2015 Craft Beer Quiz:

http://www.beersyndicate.com/blog/the-craft-beer-quiz-how-well-do-you-know-your-craft/ 

I know we've got a few (maybe more than a few) beer gurus on this board who will ace this quiz blindfolded.
Missed a couple of slogans.g

Maybe they should have included "bottling innovation"

That one I would have aced.

21
The Pub / Re: The Craft Beer Quiz
« on: March 27, 2015, 07:51:37 AM »
See how well you know your stuff with the 2015 Craft Beer Quiz:

http://www.beersyndicate.com/blog/the-craft-beer-quiz-how-well-do-you-know-your-craft/ 

I know we've got a few (maybe more than a few) beer gurus on this board who will ace this quiz blindfolded.
Missed a couple of slogans.

22
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: continental vs domestic malt flavors
« on: March 27, 2015, 07:39:28 AM »
Perhaps a mash using adjuncts or undermodified malts will convert better if the fully modified malts are more fully modified than the less fully modified malts?

Sounds sort of silly, but that's how I take it. Explains why maltsters like Briess are dropping 6 row altogether.
Six row is not being planted as much as it was, some 2 row varieties  in NA now have a DP of 160 Lintner, and a higher extract. So six row's advantages have gone away.

23
Been doing that for a long time. Other things that are antioxidants are cinnamon and coriander.

24
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: continental vs domestic malt flavors
« on: March 27, 2015, 04:51:27 AM »
Since you bring it up, I've been wondering about the difference in modification between continental and "domestic" (I'm on the continent, so technically, they're domestic to me) malts. The article below makes the claim that continental malts are less modified. It seems like a pretty general statement to me. Anybody have any idea if there is any merit to the claim?
http://beerandbrewing.com/VMvilisAAKGj51nr/article/belgian-beer-youre-probably-doing-it-wrong

(Besides that, I thought it was a great article)

Less modified when compared to American malts, but still fully modified. If you look at the Kohlbach index (S/T ratio), even the floor malted Moravian Malt that Weyermann has is 38.4, while anything at or over 38 is fully modified. American malts can be close to 50.

Barley variety and the climate have big influences on the final product.

25
From something I picked up on the old HBD back in the late 90s early 2000s timeframe, as to mix a campden tablet into the mash. The SO2 is an antioxidant that inhibits the oxidation of the malt compounds that lead to stalling. Any remaining SO2 is driven off in the boil.

26
Beer Recipes / Re: Stone releases official Levitation Ale recipe
« on: March 26, 2015, 02:15:48 PM »
They may use whirlpool additions at the brewery, however the book says to add flameout hops, chill to 72 ASAP.

Rattlesnake I may just try a straight clone. That still doesn't answer why the discrepancy though…unless Stone overstates their IBU values?

One might ask Stone if that is their estimate or a lab measurement. They have a lab, it measured the IBU numbers for Steeles IPA book.

27
Good to see some of the other "vintage" forum members active again.

28
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Evaporation Rate
« on: March 26, 2015, 04:37:05 AM »
Commercial brewers have a pretty vigorous boils from the ones I have seen. The 100 bbl system at Sierra Nevada Chico looked like the volcano. The boil off rate is down around 5% as they have a small stack for the vapors to escape.

29
Ingredients / Re: Longer boil, darker color?
« on: March 26, 2015, 04:32:14 AM »
Isn't Golden Promise a cultivar? Like Maris Otter? If so, what has the cultivar that they use have to do with how long it's kilned or stewed or toasted?

Another way they get their beer darker is by using EBC instead of SRM.

GP is a British malt variety just like Maris Otter, Pearl, Optic and so on. The GP we get is from Simpsons at 2 L and Fawcett at 3.5 L. The Fawcett is kilned longer/higher temp. 

Some have speculated on the British homebrew forums that TTL may be made with crystal malt that was made from GP green malt. I have no idea if that is true, but is a possibility.

"Another way they get their beer darker is by using EBC instead of SRM." They also save energy by boiling in Celsius.  ;D

30
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Clear Beer!
« on: March 25, 2015, 06:40:29 PM »
That is nice, Amanda. How is it?
Non-beer-judge answer? Damn tasty.
That is all that one needs to know!

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 390