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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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16
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: January 10, 2017, 08:40:17 PM »
I'm considering this.  Think it would work with a siphon instead of a dip tube and bulkhead?
https://www.morebeer.com/products/trub-trapper.html
The first glance made think it was an air filter from a carbureted car back when. Maybe a vendor had excess tooling to make these?
I had the same thought!

If one uses an immersion chiller, wouldn't it get in the way of that?
Whirlpool should be performed after chilling and removal of the immersion chiller.

I don't understand how it works. Whirlpools push the break out to the sides where gravity pulls them down and to the center. If that things gasket is on the bottom, how is break getting in the middle?

I suppose I can see it working, if I squint really hard...

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=File:Whirlpool_dynamics.gif
This was first explained by....

Albert Einstein when he observed his cup of tea after stirring.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_leaf_paradox

17
You would probably want to add gypsum or Calcium Chloride for many beers to help lower pH with the Ca addition, and add the SO4 and Cl flavor ions. That assumes you brew all grain. For extract I would use RO or distilled, as that water may give you an Alka Seltzer beer.

Some small breweries around here use a lot of phosphoric acid to drop the alkalinity. That would work even better for you, as the other ions are low, and the Na and Cl are high around here.

What general area are you in, or what is the local geology like?


18
Here's another one, and it ties into the "regular beer" theme: Yeungling should be considered "Craft" by Brewer's Association standards. Seems the reason it is not is that the Brewer's Association has some sort of max adjunct requirement, and the corn in Yeungling is what gets them.

Many of the original beers we seek to emulate also feature a great deal of adjuncts, from sugar to yes, even corn. Why should corn be any different from candi sugar?
The rules changed a few years back. They now are. The BA has a definition for craft breweries, not craft beer.
https://www.brewersassociation.org/press-releases/brewers-association-lists-top-50-breweries-2015/

As one who likes to brew CAPs, Cream Ales, and things like Ballantines IPA clones, corn can be an integral part of those beers.

I have had some good luck using flaked rice in IPAs to lighten the body with minimal taste addition.

19

I have been doing that, or if using a carbon putting foil over the mouth until fermentation subsides.

Lagers were more of me being anal retentive. I have seen open fermentation at many a Bavarian Lager brewery. If any do a wheat beer, those are always open, with a chute for the Braunhefe to flow off the the main krausen.

Pilsner Urquell is also made in open fermenters.
The unfiltered unpasteurized is, had that in the cellars last Sept. maybe the best beer ever for me.

The guide said they are in SS now. Found this.
http://www.langdale-associates.com/czecho_2009/part_1/pivo_brew.htm

20
My unpopular opinion? One is that open fermentaion is not a bad thing. You need to keep the nasties from floating in, but I have seen so many openfermentaions in Bavaria that I am doing those now (more just not snapping the lid down on the bucket for the major part of fermentaion).

Jeff, I think that opinion is a lot less unpopular than it used to be.
Edit, on second look, I think you're agreeing.

That could be Denny. I will say small traditional family ones do. So did Schönram, a region brewery that is probably about 100k bbl/year, and very modern throuout the brewery.

Ayinger? Hard to tell.

PU is in unitanks. Many of the big industrial Brewers use unitanks.

It may also come down to how the house yeast performs. Maybe just tradition?

21
Hop Growing / Re: Selling hop rhizomes
« on: January 10, 2017, 09:26:56 AM »
I don't know where you are, but I think there is a ban on sending rhizomes to Washington state.

22
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: January 10, 2017, 08:35:46 AM »
I'm considering this.  Think it would work with a siphon instead of a dip tube and bulkhead?
https://www.morebeer.com/products/trub-trapper.html
The first glance made think it was an air filter from a carbureted car back when. Maybe a vendor had excess tooling to make these?

23
My unpopular opinion? One is that open fermentaion is not a bad thing. You need to keep the nasties from floating in, but I have seen so many openfermentaions in Bavaria that I am doing those now (more just not snapping the lid down on the bucket for the major part of fermentaion).

It's the norm among homebrewers in the UK. Plastic bucket with lid that isn't airtight. Glass carboys + airlocks for beer is a cultural thing, not a necessity. Might make a good brulosophy experiment.

I have been doing that, or if using a carbon putting foil over the mouth until fermentation subsides.

Lagers were more of me being anal retentive. I have seen open fermentation at many a Bavarian Lager brewery. If any do a wheat beer, those are always open, with a chute for the Braunhefe to flow off the the main krausen.

24
My unpopular opinion? One is that open fermentaion is not a bad thing. You need to keep the nasties from floating in, but I have seen so many openfermentaions in Bavaria that I am doing those now (more just not snapping the lid down on the bucket for the major part of fermentaion).

25
All Things Food / Re: why can't you people simply say...
« on: January 08, 2017, 09:49:01 PM »
As you can see by the photo, the "stick" is super precise.

Metric needs to rule the day. It's a tiny world now. Get with it. If some people are so stupid they can't adapt from 32F to 0C, they probably aren't contributing to society anyway.
^This.  Thanks Jim.  We need to get with it.  Fractions suck too.  Also, didn't Congress pass a law in the 70's to require is to switch?
I remember being in grade school in the seventies as the US was converting to the metric system. "Learn it, don't convert it" was the mantra. Once the 1980's came I think it was viewed, along with everything else, as a communist plot.
I had to work in SI units. You get used to it. Powers of 10 have some advantages.

26
That is pretty cool. He is a regular at HomebrewCon, and I have tasted some of his winners.

27
The guy that created the dual scale Brix/SG refractometer should be kicked in the nuts.

Since I use one of those, I'm wondering what's the problem with them?

Me too.
The SG scale is off. A 10 Brix wort should be 1.040, mine says something like 1.043. I ignore the SG scale.

28
Homebrewer Bios / Re: BrewingBrian from CT
« on: January 08, 2017, 08:36:50 AM »
Welcome aboard.

29
Honestly I feel some homebrewers over stress about sanitation. As the above mention about "scratches in plastic", unless you actually have an infection a scratch in plastic isn't going to really matter, even if a srain of bleagian yeast is hiding there and you are brewing a lager. The lager yeast will far out compete the small amount of belgian yeast present.

I don't think one can stress enough about cleanliness however. We recently started using an ATP Meter at the brewery and after I used it I discovered that my tanks were not coming as clean as I thought they were and I had to up my percentage of caustic. I have a feeling some of you may be surprised at the cleanliness level of your glass carboys/plastic buckets if you are only using a PBW or oxiclean soak.
After being in German breweries that do open fermentation, I am less paranoid about sanitation.

I also would like to know what you would clean with.

30
Effectively, there are no disadvantages to plastic carboys, and I don't know why folks still use glass ones.

Because that's what I have, and if I spend the money to upgrade it'll be to stainless steel.
I have been brewing for a little over 24 years, and have a lot of carboys. They are getting used less and less. Plastic buckets and a conical get used more and more. Glass has become more scary to me.

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