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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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2656
Events / Re: NHC 2015 San Diego. Changes to Registration
« on: January 03, 2015, 08:09:58 PM »
How many people have attended in previous years?

I'm hesitant to book a flight if there is a chance I won't be allowed to attend...

This will be number 10 for me.

The conference did not sell out last year (2014). This year in San Diego, who knows?

You will see many with tickets for sale on this forum as it get near to the conference, as life happens and some will not be able to make it.

2657
Ingredients / Re: Boil time for all late hopped beer
« on: January 03, 2015, 08:18:40 AM »
I have done lid on and lid off, no difference as far as I can tell. The temp is allowed to drop, but for a 10 gallon batch it does not drop too much as far as i am concerned.

2658
Ingredients / Re: Boil time for all late hopped beer
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:53:48 AM »
Has anyone experienced DMS as a result of a hop stand?  If not, why?  Any theories?

None detected and I am sensitive to it. A rolling long boil is used to drive it off.

2659
The Pub / Re: Beer brewers vs beer "architects" in Belgium
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:38:47 AM »

Why does it matter? Unless I'm missing something, house brand and contract produced food doesn't need to be labeled with where it was made. What makes beer different?
Probably close to why food has nutritional information and ingredients on the label, not true for beer.
Beer is under TTB regulations, food is the FDA.
But that doesn't answer why the labeling is needed. I don't care where Trader Joes has their orange chicken made, why should I car where they have their beer made.

Good question, the answer maybe something from a long time ago.

2660
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water options
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:37:00 AM »
I had my softened water tested and its only 65 ppm sodium. That's fine for almost everything. I don't have anywhere nearby that has RO water and distilled only by the gallon. So I add back what brun water recommends for the beer I'm making.

This is a good point, know what is in the water. Maine has some pretty good water to begin with, so not much ion exchange would happen between Ca-Mg and Na. My soft water would probably be very high in Na, as the hardness is very high.

The blanket statement on not using soft water may not be absolute.

2661
The Pub / Re: Beer brewers vs beer "architects" in Belgium
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:32:06 AM »
Why does it matter? Unless I'm missing something, house brand and contract produced food doesn't need to be labeled with where it was made. What makes beer different?
Probably close to why food has nutritional information and ingredients on the label, not true for beer.
Beer is under TTB regulations, food is the FDA.

2662
Ingredients / Re: Cluster and Onion
« on: January 02, 2015, 05:50:08 PM »
I have to agree with Jon on this one.  Terroir and growing season play a huge role when it comes to growing Cluster.  I am drinking a British-style IPA that I made with 100% 2014 Puterbaugh Farms (the farm that owns Hops Direct) whole Cluster (bittering charge and sub-180F hopstand), TF Pearl, a dash of Cara Munich, and a mystery British ale strain that I acquired from U.C. Davis.  It is a delightful pint. 

With that said, I have received Cluster in the past from other brokers that was pure litter box.  I have not received any Cluster that reeked of onion, which leads me to believe that you may have a Cluster/native hybrid.  The only way to know for certain is to have the cones analyzed.

Fresh Cluster is a fine hop, and Hopsdirect may have the best that homebrewers can get. The catty aroma and flavor come in when old.

Most things I have seen say that the onion/garlic is harvest time related. The hybrid thing is a possibility.

2663
Ingredients / Re: When to use hop substitutions.
« on: January 01, 2015, 07:29:16 PM »
Yes the oils are volatile and flash off, when you dump them in the boil and the room fills with hoppy goodness, that is the oils leaving the party.

You can look at the numbers in this publication for each hop, and go by the averages for a hops oil. Then compare with your subs and adjust the amounts to match the oils for 1 oz. For example, Citra has high oil content, if I wanted to sub Mosaic, I might have to use close to 2 times the amount to match the oil content.

http://www.usahops.org/graphics/File/HGA%20BCI%20Reports/Variety%20Manual%207-24-12.pdf

2664
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« on: January 01, 2015, 10:33:48 AM »
As Denny pointed out, you will not get lager-like flavors by starting fermentation out warm. During the first 72 hours is when the yeast make most of the fermentation characteristics that will be the flavor of the beer. If your fermenting warm, you won't get the flavor characteristics you are looking for in a lager. It may not make a bad beer, but if your going to create ale-like esters in your lager, why not just stick with ale yeasts? That doesn't make much sense, now, does it?

For my lager schedule I start out at 48 before I pitch yeast. Aerate twice as long as ales (I prefer pure o2) pitch twice as much yeast, and let fermentation kick into high krausen at those cold temps. After about 72-96 hours you might decide to bump the temp up 2 degrees, and continue doing so every 24 hours until you get up to 56-58 degrees and let the fermentation slowly finish up. When signs of fermentation seriously start to slow down you could even let the temp raise to 60-62 to really let the beer finish cleaning itself up. Wait a few days around the 58-62 degree mark after fermentation has mostly stopped, then you can crash down to 32-34 degrees and lager for at least 1-2 weeks.

For low gravity lagers, you really only need a couple of weeks lagering time as long as you had a healthy fermentation, pitched at proper temps and got a good d-rest, etc.

Higher gravity you may want 4-6 weeks lagering.

This is close to what I do. Lagering at -1C is something I did for all of my lagers last year.

2665
Ingredients / Re: Boil time for all late hopped beer
« on: January 01, 2015, 10:30:53 AM »
The boil does more than drive off the DMS, so 60 minutes minimum boil for me. I do a Cream Ale now and then where all hops are added after flame out and whirlpooled for 45 minutes. This just uses Mt. Hood so the AA is not too high, but the beer end up having appropriate bitterness. I estimated a 12% utilization from what I can find on the net, and it seems to be about right.

Using higher AA hops will give a nice APA, with plenty of bitterness.

Edit - good to see you back.

2666
The Pub / Re: What's your New Years Eve beer?
« on: January 01, 2015, 10:25:30 AM »
We lived it up with a bottle of Schramm's Heart of Darkness.
That is great stuff! I had a sample at the NHC in Grand Rapids and I was so impressed that I decided to give Mead making another shot the past year.
One of those times when you pull that special occasion bottle off of the shelf and appreciate it. Great stuff, agreed.

2667
All Grain Brewing / Re: 60 Minute mash?
« on: January 01, 2015, 10:23:33 AM »
I have thinking about shortening my mash times to 45 minutes. Using a refractometer I have noticed no significant increases in gravity past that time.  Plus by the time I run off my first runnings, fill up the MLT, and vorlauf the grain bed has been at mash temps for probably close to 75-80 minutes.  So why not not shorten the "official" mash time to 45 minutes?

There are breweries that rest for only 20 minutes. Some of those wet mill with hot water so the mash begins with milling. Then they pump from the mash tun into the lauter tun, that takes some time for large batch sizes such as 200 barrels, no.

A lot of those breweries are also vorlaufing for another 20-30 minutes, during which time "mashing" is still happening.

Yep, the enzymes are working before and after the "mash".

2668
The Pub / Re: What's your New Years Eve beer?
« on: January 01, 2015, 07:43:01 AM »
We lived it up with a bottle of Schramm's Heart of Darkness.

2669
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: cold crashing
« on: December 31, 2014, 10:34:21 PM »

I cold crash all of my beers... In the keg. 
What he said.
At the very end I bring them up to 98.6º as rapidly as I can for final filtering
That is why we have kidneys.

2670
All Grain Brewing / Re: 60 Minute mash?
« on: December 31, 2014, 08:32:19 PM »
I have thinking about shortening my mash times to 45 minutes. Using a refractometer I have noticed no significant increases in gravity past that time.  Plus by the time I run off my first runnings, fill up the MLT, and vorlauf the grain bed has been at mash temps for probably close to 75-80 minutes.  So why not not shorten the "official" mash time to 45 minutes?

There are breweries that rest for only 20 minutes. Some of those wet mill with hot water so the mash begins with milling. Then they pump from the mash tun into the lauter tun, that takes some time for large batch sizes such as 200 barrels, no.

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