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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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2671
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Chemistry
« on: March 04, 2013, 06:25:36 AM »
When the pH will be depressed farther than desired, then adding a bit of alkalinity could be the best way.  In that case, use baking soda or lime.  Lime is the preferred option since no sodium is added.  However, last week during our discussion for the upcoming Water book, we came to the conclusion that using baking soda MIGHT be OK as long as the Na concentration is kept below 50 ppm.  If you had no sodium in your starting water, 0.5 gram of baking soda per gallon raises the sodium to 36 ppm and the alkalinity rises to 80 ppm.  That might be enough for many brewing situations.  If your water already has a lot of sodium, then this option is probably out.

I have used baking soda for my dark beers since I have low sodium in my well water and have yet to come across pickling lime in my travels. I also have some potassium bicarbonate laying around, but I haven't used it because none of the water calculators I've seen really address K+. I know potassium can give some saltiness similar to sodium, but I have no idea what the flavor threshold would be, or if there are any other adverse consequences to using it in the mash. Any thoughts?

You can find pickling lime at a farm supply store in the canning section. Or in season the big supermarkets will have canning supplies.

There is always online. http://www.fleetfarm.com/detail/mrs-wages-pickling-lime/0000000013296?utm_source=googleps&utm_medium=shopping%2Bsearch&utm_campaign=google%2Bproduct%20search&gclid=CI-kqsKU47UCFShgMgod0CwA7g

2672
Going Pro / Re: Starting a brewery
« on: March 04, 2013, 06:20:45 AM »
Sam Calagione started on a 10-gallon system. Just sayin ;-) obviously not ideal
Larry Bell started in 1985 with a 15 gallon soup pot. Sam had a Sabco Brew Magic.

There is the story (maybe from an interview) from Larry Bell that after years of brewing he went to a lawyer to start the procedure of bankrupcy. The lawyer said it would cost $1500 dollars to do it. Larry said if he had $1500 he wouldn't be there, and left the office. May not be true but I like the story.

Founders was at the point the creditors were about the foreclose. They went out and bought a set of bolt cutters just in case the doors were padlocked (that would have been more trouble I think). They still have those as a reminder of where they were.

It is a little harder than"

1. Open Brewery
2. .......?
3. Profit!




2673
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A few ideas for better beer.
« on: March 03, 2013, 05:51:39 PM »
1. No better than shaking the carboy. O2 is better, but not always required.
2. Yes
3. yes, better to let it ramp up close to the end of fermentation.
4. yes to Brunwater, no to 5.2.

Try the ones you can, when you can.

2674
Oh, no no...its probably not an infection.  If I leave the yeast and trub in my conical for several weeks after I've transferred the beer (sorry, I get lazy sometimes), I can get a powerful acetone aroma when I pop the top!  Apparently, the autolysis process can create those sorts of compounds.  There may not be any sort of strange infection causing the aroma in the barrel.

Guys, I am with Martin on this. I have racked of a batch using WLP-002 covered with foil as I thought I was brewing right after racking, and did not brew th day or the next day as planed. The yeast was not covered with much beer, so a week later it smelled like acetone.

Regular or wild, you don't want O2 in after fermentation.

I would go through the stuff to clean up the barrel, some time but little cost.

If you read enough about old English breweries they called some barrels "stinkers" and would clean them up..





 

2675
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Chemistry
« on: March 01, 2013, 12:48:29 PM »
I 'think' there may be a section on Burton water in Steele's IPA book, but after carrying some kegs up the basement stairs to the keezer, to pooped to go look it up.

There may also be some info on the "Shut up About Barklay Perkins" blog, or the "Zythophile" blog.

2676
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Chemistry
« on: March 01, 2013, 11:53:44 AM »
This thread reminded me about last week.  I've been playing with AIPA's lately and brewing to 300ppm Sulfate.  I always refer back to Desiging Great Beers for some additional info and upon reading back up on Bitters noticed the Sulfate content for Burton.  It's 801!!!

That is recommended for English IPA's and using 'Burtonized' water which is not what the OP started, but thought it would add some color commentary to the conversation.  It kind of blew me away as I've not seen a discussion with Sulfate even close to 800 for an IPA.

Dave
remember that Buton waters can have a sulfate level of 200 to 800+ depending on the location of the well.

Jeff, You need to tell Ray that as page 173, table 16.21 has Sulfate for Burton at 801........I'm just quoting! :)
More recent stuff is what I quoted, read section 3.
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/water-knowledge


2677
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Chemistry
« on: March 01, 2013, 11:19:05 AM »
This thread reminded me about last week.  I've been playing with AIPA's lately and brewing to 300ppm Sulfate.  I always refer back to Desiging Great Beers for some additional info and upon reading back up on Bitters noticed the Sulfate content for Burton.  It's 801!!!

That is recommended for English IPA's and using 'Burtonized' water which is not what the OP started, but thought it would add some color commentary to the conversation.  It kind of blew me away as I've not seen a discussion with Sulfate even close to 800 for an IPA.

Dave
remember that Buton waters can have a sulfate level of 200 to 800+ depending on the location of the well.

2678
Events / Re: NHC 2013 Entry Problems - Possible Solutions?
« on: March 01, 2013, 11:00:19 AM »
If you enter enough competitions you eventually realize that you need to step up to the judging side of the competitions. No competitions without the entrants, the judges/stewards/registrars/organizers.

2679
All Grain Brewing / Re: adding sulfate to my SNPA clone
« on: March 01, 2013, 10:36:25 AM »
Kyle has the way I would recommend it.

Get the mash pH right. Add the extra SO4 (and Ca) to the boil.


2680
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Chemistry
« on: March 01, 2013, 10:16:38 AM »
I have gone up to 350 ppm of SO4. Works fine for an IPA.

Calcium carbonate will raise the pH, if you can get it to dissolve, which is hard to do even in the mash. I use pickling lime to raise the pH.

If you were asking about using Calcium Chloride and the ratio of Sulfate to Chloride, you can go high, like 8 or 9 and have no problems. Get the pH right in the mash, and if you want more Sulfate you can add gypsum to the boil.

For AIPA, look in the Mitch Steele book, here are some water profiles that the brewers shoot for in there.

2681
Acetone smells often come from yeast (brewers and wild) that are exposed to O2. Barrels should be stored full of water so they don't dry out. That would also minimize the O2 that any yeast covering the wood, that didn't rinse out, would see. You may also have some Brett starting in the wood.

Use Barolkleen. It has some caustics in it.


Some say to use citric acid wash after to neutralize the caustics.

This says to burn the sulfur stick before. Search for cleaning wine barrels on the net to find more instructions.


2682
Did you store your barrel dry, or let the airlock dry out? First, fill it with water, dump, rinse, and make sure any yeast spooge is out of it. If it still smells like acetone, then more is needed.
 
I would go through a deep clean cycle with a caustic, rinse with acid, then burn a sulfur stick in it (don't do this on a fresh bourbon barrel).

If you still have acetone smell, then it is time to recycle it as a planter or firewood.

2683
Events / Re: NHC 2013 Entry Problems - Possible Solutions?
« on: March 01, 2013, 06:18:05 AM »
I know plenty of people with more money than skill, and they wouldn't not balk at throwing a bunch of money at $40 entries if they think it'll help them win some national awards.  Raising the entry fees to an abnormally high price would just encourage wealthier people to throw money at it while pushing out people with less means and quite possibly more skill and/or desire. 

If you want to limit the amount of entries per person, it would make more sense to just limit the number of entries per person rather than making it a question of your disposable income.

I think limiting the number of entries is a good start but I still don't think that will be enough. It's limited to 15 right now and obviously that was still too many. I understand your point about disposable income.  Someone mentioned a few pages back that one of the years Gordon Strong won the Ninkasi he spent one weeks salary on entry fees and shipping.  That sounds completely crazy to me but I don't think he "bought" the contest.   In fact I think by raising the entry fee you are not going to eliminate the hardcore homebrewer just the casual one who enters the NHC on a whim( like me!!).  In fact maybe if they raised the fees the AHA could hire an extra staffer or two to help Janice out.....thus helping all of us out!!
If look into it, I think Gordon was between jobs in 2009 (after the meltdown) and used an unemployent check for his entries.

2684
Beer Recipes / Re: Schwarzbier
« on: February 28, 2013, 04:15:03 PM »
Yes, too funny. I didn't intend this.

I think crystal in a Schwarzbier is fine. I use it in mine.

Kai

Would you use C-60 or Caramunich II or III?

2685
Events / Re: NHC 2013 Entry Problems - Possible Solutions?
« on: February 28, 2013, 10:07:50 AM »
Last year I had an O'fest that got a 42 in a local competition with >1000 entries. In the first round it got a 33. Sent a keg to club night, and some guys named Mitch Steele and Tasty McDole were behind our booth when I got back, with lots of questions about the beer along with a lot of praise. That was my reward last year.

Just wanted to point out sometimes Festbier will get a judge looking for a Maerzen. So much for the other competitions as an entry filter - the crapshoot factor.

Maybe retiring the Ninkasi is a solution (thought I would never say that). Homebrewer of the Year can be acheived with one entry.


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