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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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2761
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Used kegs
« on: December 07, 2014, 02:24:36 PM »
The AiN new kegs are made in China. They worked with the manufacturer to get them to a high quality point , and I must say the kegs look fantastic in the store. The top and bottom rubber parts look superb. The welds are as good as in the Old US made ones. The SS meets 304 specs from a test sheet they had a local lab do (saw the results somewhere).

If I decide to buy some more kegs, I will go new. Must. Resist. Urge. To Buy.

2762
Beer Recipes / Re: Devil's Backbone Vienna Lager
« on: December 07, 2014, 11:08:06 AM »
my Batch size would be 5 gallon  All Grain, and 72% efficiency.  would my local Homebrew USA have most of the grains?  and which yeast should i use with it.

Regards

Dave

Which yeast? They say Augustiner, which is said to be WLP-860 which is a seasonal strain. It may be out soon.

2763
Beer Recipes / Re: AIPA, IRA and RIS
« on: December 07, 2014, 11:06:50 AM »
Heed these words of wisdom: Be ware of recipes you find on the internet!

Good advice Keith, you are smart and handsome!

2764
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lager yeast starter at 50 degrees
« on: December 07, 2014, 10:32:27 AM »
WLP-830 for German Pilsners.

WLP-833 for malty lagers.

2765
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: diacetyl rest
« on: December 07, 2014, 09:17:24 AM »
Just curious - how do you perceive it to be?  I have heard from others that it is buttery tasting, or slick in the mouthfeel or even perceived as a bit of soap in the nose...is there a commercial example where it is prevalent to be able to know what I should be tasting or feeling?  I honestly think that I may be "blind" to it and wonder if there is a way to overcome the blind spot.  I am starting a BJCP class next week so I hope that I can make it through the various faults with enough sense to actually evaluate the beers to be judged.

I can taste diacetyl in most Sam Smiths beers. When judging I rely on the slick mouthfeel.

Some people are blind to it, I have a high threshold compared to many in the club. If you are blind to it, beyond the slick feel, not much you can do as it is like being color blind.

For some of my beers, I ask Mrs. R to taste for diacetyl as she is more sensitive to it.

2766
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with English yeasts not fully attenuating
« on: December 07, 2014, 09:13:28 AM »
On calibrating my thermometer, it's been calibrated in an ice water bath at 32.0f. But it reads 208.6 in boiling water at 2000'. Boiling water should be 210f at my altitude, right? This is the thermometer I use: http://www.thermoworks.com/products/low_cost/rt616.html. I'm not sure 1.4 degrees would make that much difference in fermentability. I'll try a longer mash time if it can improve fermentability but according to Braukaiser's chart, I am achieving damn near 100% conversion efficiency.

On limiting crystal malts, I've had the same results with a SMASH beer.

As far as using simple sugar, it's not off the table but but I would prefer to earn my English ale merit badge without it. If others can achieve satisfactory results without it, I should be able to as well.

Thanks again.
208.1F at 2000 Ft.

Really? I always thought the formula was 212@ sea level, minus one degree for every 1000'.

212 at Sea Level and standard pressure. Atm pressure will have be a smaller adjustment than altitude.
Pressure vs altitude.
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/boiling-points-water-altitude-d_1344.html

Presure and altitude can be input on this calculator.
http://www.csgnetwork.com/h2oboilcalc.html




2767
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with English yeasts not fully attenuating
« on: December 07, 2014, 08:03:56 AM »
On calibrating my thermometer, it's been calibrated in an ice water bath at 32.0f. But it reads 208.6 in boiling water at 2000'. Boiling water should be 210f at my altitude, right? This is the thermometer I use: http://www.thermoworks.com/products/low_cost/rt616.html. I'm not sure 1.4 degrees would make that much difference in fermentability. I'll try a longer mash time if it can improve fermentability but according to Braukaiser's chart, I am achieving damn near 100% conversion efficiency.

On limiting crystal malts, I've had the same results with a SMASH beer.

As far as using simple sugar, it's not off the table but but I would prefer to earn my English ale merit badge without it. If others can achieve satisfactory results without it, I should be able to as well.

Thanks again.
208.1F at 2000 Ft.

2768
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: diacetyl rest
« on: December 07, 2014, 05:46:13 AM »
I like to start raising the temps slowly just as the krausen starts dropping back into the beer.  That lets me know that the fermentation is slowing down and the yeast could probably benefit from a few degrees temp increase.  I always do a diacetyl rest regardless if I need one or not (I don't check to see if I need one first).  I figure either way warming up the beer and yeast towards the end of fermentation does not harm and can actually do some good (i.e. speed up diacetyl intake and increase attenuation).

The increased yeast activity in the D-rest also will scrub out sulfur, which is something of a benefit.

2769
Equipment and Software / Re: Bucket heater for stovetop brewing
« on: December 07, 2014, 05:39:16 AM »
Jeff, no sign of scorching at all. I pulled the stick out of the wort and put it right into a pitcher of warm water to rinse it off. There was a small bit of hop residue at the top that wiped off easily. If it got pretty gross I'd probably give it a PBW soak. Its only 1000 watts. I could see a bigger element potentially being a higher risk for scorching.

Jimmy, it goes in a normal 120V outlet. I just plug it into the GFI outlet next to my stove top. If you can manage it, you could always use a second heater to double your output. At under 40 bucks apiece it's a manageable investment.

You would want to have the second heater on another circuit if 15 amps, and it would be pushing it on a 20 amp circuit.

Thanks for the feedback on the element in the wort, Eric. I might have to try that with that to speed up getting to a boil.

2770
Equipment and Software / Re: Bucket heater for stovetop brewing
« on: December 06, 2014, 07:55:34 PM »
Jimmy,

For about 8 gallons of strike water in the cold garage it takes about 3.5 hours + to get to temp. Too much coffee for me.  ;D

2771
Equipment and Software / Re: Bucket heater for stovetop brewing
« on: December 06, 2014, 05:03:49 PM »
Jimmy K,

One of these and a heavy duty outdoor Christmas light timer allow me to wake up and be ready to mash in. Been doing that for years. When it is pulled from the strike water it goes into the sparge water to start heating that and save on propane.

Eric, any signs of scorching on the element, or extra cleaning required?  I never had the courage to try it in the wort.


2772
always used a copper wort chiller to cool my wort. effective, just takes a bit more time to get down to 50-60F and uses a ton of well water. i have run my input line into ice to chill the well water further- that helps but not as fast as I'd like it be.

for those who have gone beyond the wort chiller, what are some preferred options and additions to cooling wort quickly- to me that's about 10-15 minutes vs. 30+ minutes.

I still use an immersion chiller, but I use it in conjunction with a March pump to do recirculated chilling.  I can get 6 gal. from boiling to 60F in 10-15 min with my well water.  Although I bought the pump specifically for this, once I had it I found I could use it for other stuff, too.

I have a 50 Ft immersion chiller with the Jamil Z. return that will move the wort, which causes better convection of heat from the wort to the chiller. It will take 10 gallons down to <65F in <14.5 minutes in the winter. Summer not as fast, heck a coupe years back with a hot summer you could not get to 65F here. Ice and a pond pump solves those situations.

Maximize the chiller area. Maximize the Delta T across the chiller (cold feed water)

2773
Equipment and Software / Re: Refractometer Calibration
« on: December 01, 2014, 04:05:43 PM »
I don't know how good it is, but my LHBS has a cyber Monday sale that has a refractometer for $25, regular $89! Pulled the trigger. Will zero and check the calibration.

http://www.homebrewing.org/Brix-Refractometer-w-ATC-Automatic-Temperature-Control-_p_1776.html


2774
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Over-oxygenating?
« on: December 01, 2014, 06:54:17 AM »
Were there a lot of bubbles coming to the top of the wort? If there were the O2 was not fully getting into the wort, you did end up with O2 in the headspace.

As other have said, I do 1 liter/min. for a 5 gallon beer.

2775
Equipment and Software / Re: Refractometer Calibration
« on: November 30, 2014, 06:51:16 PM »

Adjusting the zero does not give you the gain (slope), and checking the gain at multiple points will show you if your instrument in linear. One learns this from every day practice over the years (until you are no longer doing hands on work).

What good is the refractometer if the gain is not linear?  I would imagine that really throws off the FG calculations too.  I wonder if that is why every model for determining FG is different: they all used their own variable refractometer.

Is there a solution?  Maybe buy a better refractometer?  Or is this a permanent flaw in the refraction through the prism? It seems odd that these tools have passed the test of time with wine, but they don't work with a standard curve using sucrose.

Solution?

Buy a good one. Avoid dropping it - as I have done more than once! I must say that I have only broken 1 hydrometer in 22 years, so I have that going for me, which is nice.

It does give a quick check of the gravity, so it is expedient.

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