Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: 1 ... 186 187 [188] 189 190 ... 533
2806
Willamette is essentially Fuggles.
US Tettnang was found to be Fuggles through DNA testing.
Thanks a lot for the info.
Hmm, not so well chosen then, I have to consider this. I have place for a total of 16 plants, overkill to have four "Fuggles". I must try to get other varieties from US next spring.

Willamette is Fuggles DNA, but is a Tripliod hybrid, so it is more robust than Fuggles. US Willamette is also different from UK Fuggles, as the terroir will give different flavor and aroma. If you don't mind Fuggles, plant one of each and see what you think. You can remove them if not to your liking.

2807
All Grain Brewing / Re: BIAB and OG (yes another BIAB thread)
« on: November 19, 2014, 10:14:13 AM »
DME is about 40 points per pound per gallon.

DME carries points per pound per gallon (PPG) value of 46.  DME's PPG value is used to determine the maximum extract possible from a batch of malt based on it's dry basis, fine grind (DBFG) percentage

Briess 2-Row DBFG = 80.5%

Briess 2-Row extract in PPG = 0.805 x 46 = 37 PPG
Hey S.C., never seen that. If you have some information that shows how that is a reference standard, can you share?

The method to determine the extract from a batch of malt is the Congress Mash, which has a procedure for preparing the malt, the fine grind, the water is distilled, the time and temp are specified. And so on.
http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/blog/understanding-a-malt-analysis/

Noonan has some information on malt analysis, too.
http://morebeer.com/brewingtechniques/bmg/noonan.html

The brewers that have mash presses/filters can exceed 100% by a little, as they squeeze the mash and get more liquid out.

I am really looking forward to the Malt book by John Mallett. Now that the Water book is out, I think that malt is the area that is lacking in information.



2808
Thanks to all you brewmasters for sharing. One of the reasons I asked about single hops beer is that started growing hops in Sweden using rizhomes from seven American varieties that a friend bought for me, and I collected in L.A. in May. First year harvest was not big (totally 10 oz/300 grams dried weight), but all grew to the max height of the trellis (13 / 16 ft). The varieties that I managed to get were Magnum, Cascade, Zeus, Chinook, Nugget, Willamette and Tettang.  The "+1" comment stuck, do you see any good combinations using my limited hops stock, or do I need other varieties?
Willamette is essentially Fuggles.
US Tettnang was found to be Fuggles through DNA testing.

2809
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA Water profile
« on: November 19, 2014, 06:37:35 AM »
I haven't got to the point where im testing my water yet but I want to. What kind of tests or kits are you guys using? It seems like the kits are pretty pricy.
Many of us have used this lab. Test W6.
http://wardlab.com/FeeSchedule/WardLabs_FeeSchedule_Web.pdf#page=10

2810
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Question regarding water
« on: November 18, 2014, 06:38:40 PM »
assuming that get's your pH where you need it it sound fine.

When I do a marzen I add some gypsum (Can't remember the actual amounts) becuase I think that a dry, crisp finish is ideal for those styles. Plenty of munich malt will get you the malty character you want but the sulfate will help with the crisp finish. FWIW

Can the gypsum be added to the boil, therefore adding the sulfate (after the mash) but not changing the mash ions or ph?

well so if you add it to the boil, you cant impact the mash PH because that's done and over with. it will change wort PH and will add the sulfates as mentioned.

everything you put in or take out of the mash impacts the mash -so keep that in mind when building your water profile for the mash.

The Ca drops the mash pH due to reactions with the Phytin in the malt, which releases a H+ ion which by definition drops the pH. I have never measured the boil pH when I add gypsum, any data that it drops the pH? I am curious, is all.

I have not and could be completely wrong in that presumption that it plays any role alone or in conjunction in lowering PH . I've added calcium chloride and gypsum in boil and only taken PH to make sure I'm somewhere in the optimal range for hot break. 

Something I read:
Wort pH will fall from 5.6–5.8 at the start of boiling to around 5.2–5.4 at the end. This is primarily due to the precipitation of calcium phosphate. Calcium ions in brewing water reacts with phosphates from the malt to form calcium phospate and hydrogen ions, which lower wort pH.

This demonstrates the importance of excess calcium ions in the wort after mashing. For this reason, it is sometimes a good idea to add gypsum to the kettle. If your mash pH is fine, but the pH does not drop to at least 5.4 by the end of the boil, add 1/4–1/2 teaspoon of gypsum per five gallons. 



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Thanks, good information. I need to check kettle pH more often.

2811
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Question regarding water
« on: November 18, 2014, 05:48:16 PM »
assuming that get's your pH where you need it it sound fine.

When I do a marzen I add some gypsum (Can't remember the actual amounts) becuase I think that a dry, crisp finish is ideal for those styles. Plenty of munich malt will get you the malty character you want but the sulfate will help with the crisp finish. FWIW

Can the gypsum be added to the boil, therefore adding the sulfate (after the mash) but not changing the mash ions or ph?

well so if you add it to the boil, you cant impact the mash PH because that's done and over with. it will change wort PH and will add the sulfates as mentioned.

everything you put in or take out of the mash impacts the mash -so keep that in mind when building your water profile for the mash.

The Ca drops the mash pH due to reactions with the Phytin in the malt, which releases a H+ ion which by definition drops the pH. I have never measured the boil pH when I add gypsum, any data that it drops the pH? I am curious, is all.


2812
I wouldn't use any British or German hops in a single hop AIPA, for starters. So no Kent Goldings, Fuggles, Hallertau, Saaz, etc.

These are good for this : Centennial, Citra, Simcoe, Mosaic, Ahtanum, Chinook, Equinox, Nugget, Columbus, to name a few.

EDIT  -  I'd add Galaxy, Nelson Sauvin, Azacca, Calypso and El Dorado.  An El Dorado IPA would be a 'fruit bomb' but it might be interesting....once.

I plan on doing a Mandarina Bavaria Pale Ale in the near future. Huell Melon would be another good choice. Don't count the Germans out.

2813
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First IPA-brewing salt question
« on: November 18, 2014, 03:02:48 PM »
There was a recent article in the local monthly beer magazine which interviewed San Diegos award winning IPA homebrewers. They touched on each main ingredient. Kelsey McNair starts with r/o water and adds gypsum and calcium chloride and sometimes Epsom salts. He shoots for 250 ppm sulfates, 100-120 calcium and likes the chloride at a 1 to 5 ratio vs gypsum. He also says "bicarbonate is your enemy".

The purpose of adding salts to the mash is for mash ph. Salts can be added to the boil or anytime after. A salt to taste approach, everyones tastes are unique.

starting PH in bru'n water is 5.30:
- adding 1.2gr baking soda to 5.6 gal water results in +.1  PH (now 5.4) and +40ppm Bicarb
or
- adding .7gr pickling lime to 5.6 gal water results in +.1 PH (now 5.4) and +56ppm bicarb

so adding pickling lime vs. baking soda  to shift .1PH results in higher bicarb PPM

I think I now see what you were saying. The absolute level of bicarb is not that high.

My point is that pickling lime is pretty powerful, and has its use as you add Ca and not Na, as for some styles the Na might not be desired.

For the record, I have both in my sealed jar of salts that gets brought out on brewday.

2814
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First IPA-brewing salt question
« on: November 18, 2014, 01:34:28 PM »
I also target 5.4 pH for IPA (and most beers).  5.5 for dark beers, 5.3 for pale lagers, and 5.2 for saison.

what level bicarb you running on you r IPA's?

I'll post after I get home to check, Ken. It usually involves bumping from  ~ 5.3-5.35 up to 5.4 - not a ton. And starting from RO water, bicarb starts out at very little.

your profile seems very similar to mine. i add 1.4gr baking soda to get about 5.4 and thats around 64ppm bicarb.

try pickling lime over baking soda.

it takes more calcium hydroxide to move the PH up to 5.4 with a higher bicarb PPM resulting, than 1.4gr baking soda and less of  bicarb PPM shift.
The pH will move more with Ca(OH)2, as you add 2 OH- ions, and the Ca will move it down a little. You add NaHCO3 (baking soda) and you get one HCO3- ion, the Na doesn't move the pH.

Looking at the Brunwater example I have, adding 0.1 gr/gallon will move the pH up 0.9 for pickling lime and 0.5 for baking soda.

2815
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Question regarding water
« on: November 18, 2014, 01:21:30 PM »
Correct me if im wrong but doesn't the malts have enough mg that there is no need to add any?
I think it depends on the style. The malt does supply Mg, enough for yeast health. The yeast will take up Mg, then what? You may not have enough for the flavor it gives - it is known as Bittersalz in German. Some of the ions can be pretty low, but work to give a certain taste.

2816
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Question regarding water
« on: November 18, 2014, 11:57:54 AM »
There are pull down water profiles in Brun'water that can give you an idea of what to do. You will want Amber Ballanced or Amber Malty for most lagers that I can think of off the top of my head. Look on tab 3, cell 5a.

I did a BoPils with just some CaCl2 to get to 35 ppm, and the beer tasted minerally. Martin has written about the importance of having some other flavor ions, such as Na, SO4 and even Mg to give the correct flavor profile.

As far as sulfates, it will give more of a sharp dry bitterness, which you don't want in a BoPils, but is an essential characteristic for a German Pils. I always add gypsum to get the SO4 up in my German Pils. The example above for the BoPils was to keep the SO4 out, but I should have gone with the Pilsen water profile.

2817
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: PSA - New Yeast Company
« on: November 18, 2014, 06:26:52 AM »
So , if it's 200 billion cells for $13... how is this different than buying two packs of Wyeast?
+1

2818
Other Fermentables / Re: S-05 in a Mead?
« on: November 17, 2014, 08:19:47 PM »
The club's mead project, same must different yeast, had US-05 as one of the yeasts. IIRC it went to about 15% with staggered nutrient additions, and the CO2 knocked out a couple times a day.

2819
The Pub / Re: What's the Weather Like Where You Are?
« on: November 17, 2014, 09:38:38 AM »
80F yesterday, a little colder today, and it will be much colder tonight when I get home.

2820
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 1469...Sulphur??
« on: November 17, 2014, 09:36:08 AM »
I f a lager fermentation smells sulfury, I'm not concerned as the sulfur has left the beer.

Pages: 1 ... 186 187 [188] 189 190 ... 533