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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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2956
Ingredients / Re: Homemade Flaked Rye
« on: October 30, 2014, 05:31:35 AM »
Had some extra raw rye and wanted to use it in a different way.

Let us know how this works for you.

2957
All Grain Brewing / Re: Wee Heavy extended boil time?
« on: October 29, 2014, 06:44:25 PM »
I think that really answers the question I so poorly worded. Where in the boil to add the reduced first runnings. Thanks jeff

The timing was such that it went in during the last 5 or 10 minutes to be more exact.
While we're talking practice, I kill the heat on the side boil, then I ladle in a pint or two of the main boil to cool/thin/deglaze the syrup. Does anyone else do this, or are you just dumping it right into the main boil? Also, I just add it to the boil whenever it's ready, rather than waiting until the end.

That is an excellent procedure!

2958
All Grain Brewing / Re: Wee Heavy extended boil time?
« on: October 29, 2014, 01:39:00 PM »

Denny, you know how long, roughly, it takes you to boil that down?

IIRC, 1-2 hours.  But it obviously will depend on boil vigor, pot geometry, etc.

I haven't done it many times, but one gallon goes into a 5 gallon pot, and the flame is turn up. The reduction is ready to add by the end of boil.
I think that really answers the question I so poorly worded. Where in the boil to add the reduced first runnings. Thanks jeff

The timing was such that it went in during the last 5 or 10 minutes to be more exact.

2959
Equipment and Software / Re: HERMS and stuck mash
« on: October 29, 2014, 11:39:52 AM »
The suction from the pump, even when throttled, can result in an appreciable force when multiplied by the false bottom area. You void even be causing the bottom of the cooler to deform up. A castelated nut on the bottom should help maintain flow.

Is there much chance the local hardware store will have a castellated/slotted nut of the right type (1/2" NPS)? Do you think it would be adequate to make cuts with my dremel tool cutting disks or will they be too thin?

You might phone them and ask.

Looking at the picture, it might be worth a try to loosen the jamb nut on top, back the elbow out a couple of guns, then tighten the jamb nut. That shoul give clearance so it is worth a try.

2960
All Grain Brewing / Re: Wee Heavy extended boil time?
« on: October 29, 2014, 11:21:47 AM »
Denny, you know how long, roughly, it takes you to boil that down?

IIRC, 1-2 hours.  But it obviously will depend on boil vigor, pot geometry, etc.

I haven't done it many times, but one gallon goes into a 5 gallon pot, and the flame is turn up. The reduction is ready to add by the end of boil.

2961
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Yeast Affects Beer
« on: October 29, 2014, 11:18:24 AM »
Many breweries use the Chico strain. I am not sure that one would think that SN , Russian River,  and Founders all taste alike.

SN uses the same 2.row and C60 as the base for most of their ales. The water would be treated the same. Their beers have a house flavor, but it is the sum of yeast, ingredients, and process being similar.
I was primarily referring to yeast strains that impart flavor :)

I was replying to Jim, who brought up SN.

No argument that certain British strains are distinctive and impart a house flavor. Some Belgian strains immediately bring the brewery to mind, WY-3787 and I go Mmmm Westmalle!

2962
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Yeast Affects Beer
« on: October 29, 2014, 10:22:54 AM »
Many breweries use the Chico strain. I am not sure that one would think that SN , Russian River,  and Founders all taste alike.

SN uses the same 2.row and C60 as the base for most of their ales. The water would be treated the same. Their beers have a house flavor, but it is the sum of yeast, ingredients, and process being similar.

2963
Equipment and Software / Re: Aluminum Pot Oxidation
« on: October 29, 2014, 07:09:17 AM »
I was always told to never use aluminum because it will impart off flavors in the wort.

That may be true if you started with a freshly scrubbed kettle that was shiny and bright. But if you start with an oxidized dull gray surface like shown above, there is no chance of metallic flavor.  My kettle now has a tea-colored finish to it. I only scrub to the degree necessary to remove trub, never hard enough to remove the patina. Aluminum is well suited to homebrewing use.  Its not suited for kettles that get scrubbed and polished, like in a commercial brewery.

Aluminum's oxide layer will not stand up to the caustics that breweries use when they CIP.

One should not go too acidic with aluminum either. Boiling wort is fine as it is only mildly acidic, but cooking tomatoes in aluminum will also damage the oxide layer. 

2964
Ingredients / Re: Homemade Flaked Rye
« on: October 28, 2014, 10:21:14 AM »
Yes it was how to make torrified wheat at home. It should work for other grains.

Do you want to do this with raw rye?

2965
Equipment and Software / Re: HERMS and stuck mash
« on: October 28, 2014, 10:11:53 AM »
The suction from the pump, even when throttled, can result in an appreciable force when multiplied by the false bottom area. You void even be causing the bottom of the cooler to deform up. A castelated nut on the bottom should help maintain flow.

2966
In addition to the leaks and rust issue I would also be concerned about the content of the metal. I wouldn't trust that it is really stainless steel given the other problems people have experienced.

Not thait's anything but the coarsest of tests, but has any put a magnet on one of these?
The grades of SS that we use are austenitic and non-magnetic (300 series).

The 400 series if ferritic or martensitic, and those can have magnetic properties. I just have to look at the fridge in the kitchen.

That said for food grade you generally want 304 or better. Knives are often made with 400 grades due the fact that they need to hold a sharp edge. Just checked the nice German steel knives in the kitchen, and those are magnetic.

2967
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Recycling Plastic Kegs
« on: October 27, 2014, 04:47:43 PM »
Great post Gary. Even as homebrewers we need to have personal safety in everything we do. Be careful out there!

2968
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Questions: My First Lager fermentation
« on: October 27, 2014, 04:40:59 PM »
When you all say that you cold-crash, do you lower the temp gradually over a period of days?  Or do you set the temp controller to say 32-34F and cool it down in a matter of hours?  I read somewhere to not cool it down more than 5F per day, or you will shock the yeast. 

I just did my second lager, and I cooled it gradually.  I'm just wondering if I'm wasting time for nothing.

If you perform a d-rest and you had a healthy fermentation then your lagering is not really about letting the yeast clean up the beer at cool temperature over a long period of time but just getting the beer to drop clear. In that case it doesn't matter how fast you cold crash. On the other hand, if you are relying upon the traditional lagering approach then you would want to adopt a slower schedule for chilling to 32F.

This is what I have said often. Somewhere I read that crashing too fast stresses the yeast, and they give off esters and other flavor compounds. As a homebrewer, I will try to go down about 4 degrees F or less a day and see if that does any good. My lagers are generally good, just seeing if I can make them better!

2969
Equipment and Software / Re: HERMS and stuck mash
« on: October 27, 2014, 04:01:35 PM »
As Jeff says, have a ball valve on the pump output to throttle the flow. It is sometimes a good idea to close the valve, start the pump, and slowly open until you have flow (not full flow). Then turn on the heating element, and see if you can maintain flow.

Another issue is that the false bottom could be bottoming out under pressure. What that means is that the elbow contacts the bottom of the tun, shutting off flow. Some designs have castellated ends so that the flow is not shut off, some guys cross drill to give more flow area. Some coolers have a small dome in the center, which makes it worse - don't ask me how I know this.

It is generally thought that slots are better than holes. On a pro level there are many examples of slots, but there are some that have holes.

2970
I am waiting for someone like John Blichmann to come out with a home brew mash press. That way we can all argue over the 100+ efficiency, amount of work involved, and quality of the beer. It will be good training for working at the few breweries with mash presses (Alaskan and Griffin Claw to name a couple).
I have a small cider press I might try out with my bag of grain at the end of mashing just to see how much efficiency improvement and any effect on taste. I don't want to add something to clean, that would be against the point of biab for my purposes anyway, so any improvement would have to be big to make me use one.

At Griffin Claw the grain get hammer milled, the husks are removed, and the fine flour goes into the mash press. That is how they don't get astringency. Homebrew hammer mill needed too.

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