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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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31
Homebrew Competitions / Re: 2016 NHC
« on: April 28, 2016, 04:52:07 AM »
How much do tickets actually cost for NHC? Thinking of going next time it swings back to CO


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The fees are listed in the HomebrewCon.org page.
http://www.homebrewcon.org/registration/registration-fees/

Getting there, staying there, eating there, and outside drinking there are at your discretion. Those can add up.

That being said, this will be #11 for me.

32


What's the theory you have? Many of mine in the past have ended up kind of sweet tasting, which makes me wonder if my final beer pH is too high. Lately, I've been acidifying in the kettle with a couple mL of lactic acid and I haven't had any sweetness issues. But I also wonder if I'm picking up more O2 than I should because that sweetness I've gotten in the past in light lagers has seemed kind of honey grahams-like. Honey is a sign of oxidation, yes?

Not necessarily, but I guess it's possible.  To me, malt oxidation comes off more as an exaggerated caramel.
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Oxidation of malt can give 2,3-pentanedione, which is honey like. That is what I get in many German beers here in the US, those have started to stale, they don't have that honey aroma when fresh in der Vaterland.

I might try the mini-mash, one with boiled then cooled water treated with Campden, one with heated water. That will have to wait a while. One can get busy in retirement!

33
Ingredients / Re: Brewing Water From Deep Wells in Munich?
« on: April 27, 2016, 10:15:11 AM »
Look at the 'boiled' Munich profile in Bru'n Water to understand the change that can be produced.

Does this potentially mean that the "boiled" Munich profile is fairly close to what they are using today?
If the statement that they have water like Pilsen, maybe not.

34
Ingredients / Re: Brewing Water From Deep Wells in Munich?
« on: April 27, 2016, 10:02:54 AM »
Interesting. All of southern Bavaria sits on a mantle of clastic soils that overlie a thick clay layer which then overlies the bedrock. Since the clastic soils are largely derived from the Alps and its predominantly carbonate rock, groundwater in clastic soils tends to be hard and alkaline.

However, it appears that Paulaner is getting their groundwater from a deeper zone that may avoid the harder water above. Since they are a relatively small user of groundwater (compared to a city), they may be able to get away with drawing water from that deeper zone. Hopefully it will last.

Interestingly, Bavarian waters can generally be decarbonated fairly well into soft and less alkaline water that is more suited to brewing. Look at the 'boiled' Munich profile in Bru'n Water to understand the change that can be produced.
Yeah, one gallon of my tap water in 9 gallons of RO hits the treated profile you had in Zymurgy.

Mrs. R has started to ask me about a trip she wants to do. I might try and line up some brewery tours if not too pricey - Ayinger is pricey unless you have 15 or more.


35
Ingredients / Brewing Water From Deep Wells in Munich?
« on: April 27, 2016, 06:43:45 AM »
In the past two days I have run across two referrences for Breweries in the Munich area using deep bored wells to source their water. The water is said to be soft, but no detailed information. Martin may have more information, or might have interest.

The first was on a site about the Ayinger tour (someday we will do that one). Scroll down a little, and there is a picture of a display depicting the geology, and a water fountain built out of a rock, and a little text.
http://allaboutbeer.com/paulaner-water/

The other was this one from Paulaner. It states that the deep water is similar to the water in Pilsen. It also points out that Germany has banned fracking - which made me smile, as Germany has essentially zero petroleum resources.
http://allaboutbeer.com/paulaner-water/

For my own brewing, I have been diluting 1 gallon of my water with 9 gallons of RO for Dunkels. I might as well just use RO and add some minerals.

36
Ingredients / Re: Do I need any additives for my water?
« on: April 27, 2016, 05:37:51 AM »
The iron is high, and probably what you taste. Should be <300 ppb.
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/water-knowledge

Mash pH will depend on the water and grist. What type of beers do you brew? There are some that would give you issues, as no water is perfect for all styles

37
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry hopping during active fermentation
« on: April 26, 2016, 10:19:48 AM »
My own testing has given me better results by dry hopping after removing the beer from the yeast.
I have good results doing both sequentially. Nobody told me I couldn't.  ;D

38
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry hopping during active fermentation
« on: April 26, 2016, 05:28:14 AM »
I always wait until fermentation has completed.  That way the CO2 does not carry the hop aroma out of the fermenter as it escapes and instead stays in contact with the beer.
I'm going to call BS on this as an old brewer's tale that just makes no sense to me whatsoever. If the hop oils are in solution, then there is little risk of CO2 in gas form removing it from the beer. Hop aroma compounds aren't some magical substance that evaporates rapidly at room temperature (after it is already dissolved in solution, mind you) if you look at it the wrong way.

As far as I understand, during the dry hopping process you are not extracting any significant amount of oils from the hops and instead are just taking some of the fragrance? In order to extract and isomerize oil from hops and imbue your beer with it, you need to reach a temperature of 175 F or so (at least for bittering purposes).  If that is true, it seems to me that a sealed environment or at least one that was not constantly being purged with CO2 would be better. It would be awesome to see some research on it as I am just speculating.
Dry hopping gets the oils into the beer, and is about the only way to get some of the oils to stay in the beer as those are volitile.

Dry hopping with active yeast gives the boitransformations that can create some floral and fruity aromas. Stan Hieronymus has written a fair amount about that, and dry hopping in general.

39
Ah, gotcha. Still, I'd like to try a blind tasting of the beers I mentioned myself.


Jeff, I'm curious about the other brewery Kai lists, Wippra:

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Museums-_und_Traditionsbrauerei_Wippra

They certainly get HSA in their beers, check out that lauter grant.

Pilsner Urquell is said to still run off through grants, and that HSA is partially responsible for the color.

HSA, I don't worry about it, but I don't beat up the mash either. A Campden tablet in the mash is something I have done for a long time. Deaerating the water through a boil, chilling, then adding the Campden to the water before the grain is something new. I don't think I will go out and buy a SS immersion chiller or a plate chiller. A copper immersion chiller could be soaked in an acid solution before the brew to remove the oxide layer and make it nice and shiny.

40
The Pub / Re: Home sound system
« on: April 25, 2016, 07:45:37 PM »
HDMI? Remotes? My HiFi is a little old school, not vacuum tube old school, but I bought it in '74&75 when I got out of college. Paid a lot for it, and still have it. Mac MR-78, C-28, Mac 2100 amp. Other than some power supply issues on the amp and tuner, still working fine.
That sounds like an awesome system Jeff. As I posted earlier, I remember seeing Mac components going for a lot more than my whole system at the store I bought from

First really nice things I ever bought. Buy once, cry once. I still have those, so over 41 years, not so bad.  ;)

41
What about the excellent beers that one can have at small breweries throught Bayern that don't have capabilities beyond a big home brew setup? one I was at early Dec. had a 6000 liter system from 1971, and I don't think did anything beyond my capabilities. Well, maybe he was pitching a ton of yeast from a brewery the next town over.

Edit - this is one my must see list. Several have said they make the best Pilsner they have had.
http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Museumsbrauerei_Schmitt

42
One should make sure of the vacuum rating for the fermentation vessel. Some vessels are good in pressure, not so good in a vacuum load case.

http://discussions.probrewer.com/showthread.php?33925-Imploded-a-120BBl-tank-without-a-vacuum-relief-valve

43
It doesn't exist.  Or, at least, not in a bad way  ;)b

Have you seen what a grant or a traditional decoction look like?

This.  Plus have these guys ever listened to somebody like Charlie Bamforth, a real scientist?
Narziss and Kunze weren't scientists? Also, I didn't think many (any?) Of the German breweries were doing decoctions anymore.

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There are still traditional breweries that do decoctions. I visited one in Niederbayern that still does. What surprised me was that the decoction and boil are direct fired with heating oil, which has to be expensive.

Some of the bigger breweries in Munich are said to still decoct the beers that they have found benefit from it.

44
The Pub / Re: Home sound system
« on: April 25, 2016, 11:11:51 AM »
HDMI? Remotes? My HiFi is a little old school, not vacuum tube old school, but I bought it in '74&75 when I got out of college. Paid a lot for it, and still have it. Mac MR-78, C-28, Mac 2100 amp. Other than some power supply issues on the amp and tuner, still working fine.

45
German tradition states that no fining agents be used in lager production.

With that being said, I don't think one needs to use fining agents to produce a clear lager. If you decide to go this route, an extended cold crash period prior to packaging may be in order to accelerate the clearing of the beer during the lagering period.

I brew quite a bit of lagers and I do (for the most part) gel fine them.  I feel that it brilliantly clears up the beer very quickly and can even make the beer more drinkable, earlier.

Thanks, Touche' on the time aspect.  I do believe however Germans get away with Polyclar as it is "removed".   
PVPP can be used as it has been proven that none is in the beer after filtration.


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