Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 508
31
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Considering some literature about
« on: August 18, 2016, 05:12:54 AM »
You have the starting out books recommended.
"Brewing Classic Styles" is a good book for recipes.
If you want a different take on things, "Brewing Better Beer" and "Modern Homebrew Recipes" by Gordon Strong are good.

One can keep reading as one enjoys the hobby. I am working through "The Chemistry of Beer" by Barth, and that one explains the chemistry behind all the brewing, so it is more advanced.

32
Beer Recipes / Re: Would like Feedback on a Lager Recipe
« on: August 17, 2016, 04:11:23 PM »
833 is my malty lager yeast of choice. Should be a good drinking beer.

33
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lallemand London ESB Premium Yeast
« on: August 16, 2016, 02:55:35 PM »
Sounds like it might be 1968/wlp 002? If so, it's about time.
[/quoteyes, those are said to be the Fuller's yeast, and the first post had a quote from John Keeling,the head Brewer at Fuller's. Pretty good bet that this is the dry equivalent.

34
Ingredients / Re: Underwhelmed by Horizon hops
« on: August 16, 2016, 07:10:52 AM »
Horizon can be a good bittering hop, but it only has 1% oils. Compared to Citra with up to 3% oils, it would be a little weak. I did not look too hard at the oils content, and the differences there are what gives the different hops their characteristic aromas.

Look here.
https://ychhops.com/varieties

35
Ingredients / Re: Hop Hash for bittering?
« on: August 15, 2016, 12:30:54 PM »
It appears to be for bittering, whirlpool, dry hop. So yes.
https://www.morebeer.com/category/hop-hash.html

36
Ingredients / Re: water profile for german altbier
« on: August 14, 2016, 07:04:40 PM »
Can't say I have ever really tasted a well made Northern German Alt or even been successful at brewing a good one in the past either. These tend to be more like a smoother, clean fermented german brown ale, right? More or less?

Have brewed a ton of excellent Dusseldorf alts though. I enjoy them quite a bit.

Yeah, more or less, but browns tend toward a more prominent crystal/caramel/chocolate malt character, while alts tend to taste a bit more toasty. No. German Alt is a bit less bitter than Dusseldorf Alt. 

Alaskan Amber was (was - N German Alt was subsumed into Altbier in the 2015 guidelines, so it no longer exists as a distinct style) one of the classic commercial examples in the 2008 guidelines.  It's a very clean, quaffable beer.  It's ubiquitous up here in the PACNW.  About every gas station and 7-11 has it in stock.
Alaskan Amber was a go to beer when we were in Alaska. At about 19 IBU it was far from a Düsseldorf Alt. Zum Uerige is more like like 45-50, some call it an outlier for a Düsseldorf Alt. I call it my favorite.

37
Going Pro / Re: Congrats Majorvices!
« on: August 13, 2016, 03:39:34 PM »
Nice looking awards. I have to get there for a visit someday.


38
Ingredients / Re: water profile for german altbier
« on: August 13, 2016, 07:38:51 AM »
I'm not exactly sure what you guys mean by 'amber' as it regards to the style I'm making.  Are you saying the color of the beer has a certain mash pH? Are there generalizations for what specific chemicals you would put in deionized water to make the proper pH? I'm basically making the recipe from Brewing Classic Styles.

Color to a certain extent. Grist is also important.

https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/water-knowledge

39
All Grain Brewing / Re: pH Effects?
« on: August 12, 2016, 10:05:32 AM »
MoreBeer doesnt sell sinimar, but I prefer to use grains.

Midnight Wheat and Carafa Special are supposed to be the least roasty.

Sinamar is grains...or was before they were mashed and fermented.
Denny, not fermented.
http://www.weyermann.de/eng/produkte.asp?idkat=26&umenue=yes&idmenue=&sprache=2

It is a color addition. On the tour I was on in Nov. they said Weyermann bought the company that made the extract in the 30s IIRC. The original wa sin Berlin.

Interesting.  I read a FAQ there yesterday that said they were.  Wonder if I can find it again?
i would be interested in that link. On the tour they said it started out as a food color additive.

Well found one from old Horst. How fermentable is an all Carafa wort? 0 DP, so what would convert?
http://byo.com/hops/item/1374-sinamar

http://www.weyermannmalt.com/cz/faq.asp?umenue=yes&idmenue=250&sprache=13

What is Sinamar®?
Answer    Sinamar®, a registered trademark of the Bamberg specialty malts manufacture with the connected roasted malt beer brewery Heinz Weyermann®, was already developed by the company founder Johann Baptist Weyermann in the early 20th century.

It is a pure natural product, which is manufactured entirely from dehusked, roasted malt. There is an almost tasteless, de-bittered, highly liquid, deep black essence, which is used by breweries in more than 135 countries to lend their beers colors or to correct them without compromising their delicate taste of beer. Sinamar® derives its brand name from the Latin "sine amaro", which literally means "without bitterness". From its small beginnings in the early 20th century mainly as colorant for Bavarian ales and pastries, Sinamar® has developed into a universally used roasted malt extract over the decades.

Today it not only gives thousands of beer brands worldwide color on completely natural way and without unpleasant flavor impact but also helps products in the food and non-alcoholic beverages industry as well as juices and distillates to receive their attractive coloration. Sinamar® is now used by companies on all continents. The Sinamar® customers are responsible for ensuring that Sinamar®, although occasionally imitated, today is the international market leader in roast malt extracts.

Sinamar® is an exceptional malt in some respects. It is about 40 times as dark as the darkest beer. Compared to "normal" malt extracts Sinamar® has no fermentable sugar content, because it is not derived from spice, but from already fermented beer; therefore, it is concentrated, however, non-alcoholic beer, whose sugar content is used up and whose alcohol is removed. The purpose of Sinamar® is not the simplified production of wort or beer by commercial sites, which for example, do not have their own brewing house, but the de-bittered color correction of beverages and foods.

The biggest advantage in addition to the ease of use - the use is possible in almost all stages of production - is the "clean labeling" -decoration - so no E-number – of the natural product already in conventional quality. Moreover Sinamar® from Weyermann® is also available in organic quality.
So it can't be made from 100% Carafa. No Diastatic Power in Carafa, starches have been carbonized at the temps in the drum. It must be a RHG work around.

40
All Grain Brewing / Re: pH Effects?
« on: August 12, 2016, 08:55:29 AM »
I wonder if some yeast is perched into the wort, so they can call it "beer" for the RHG?

41
When I first walked by a display of this beer in the grocery store with the slogan "top fermented" I laughed and my wife asked what was funny about that. My wife loves good beer but I wouldn't expect 95% of lovers of good beer to read between the lines and Strangeland knows this. Homebrewers are just not their target audience anymore. They know their market and understand that pilsners are kind of the "it" beer right now - particularly in the hot summer. They called a blonde ale a Pilsner and I would guess it sells better than it should because of that.

Contrast that with Circle Brewery in north Austin who makes a great, refreshing, clean, balanced blonde ale and calls it exactly that. I drink the hell out of that beer in the summer. In fact, it's an award winning beer (I know, that's faint praise for a blonde ale but it really is well executed).

Strangeland isn't the first brewery in Austin to not have a "beer first and foremost" attitude and it won't be the last.
So I have to ask, what is your opinion on Austin Beerworks Pearl Snap Pils?

As much as I like ABW as a place to hang out and have a few pints, I would not be surprised if Pearl Snap was hybrid/ale fermented. It's refreshing but there is something slightly off about it to me.
It has been recommended to me, once it may have been bad lines, the second time it was just not Pils like and uninspired.

Great! Now we can start a grand Austin non-pils conspiracy theory! Kidding (only sort of).

Live Oak Pils, like I said, I'd bet my house that's an actual lager strain and is probably my favorite pilsner in town. Live Oak, like Circle, are two of a handful of breweries in town that just execute really well on a smaller number of beers. Not the sexiest or most savy with their marketing but you can tell they put beer first.
Live Oak Pils was most definately a true Pilsner in the Bohemian style. Real Ale Hans Pils is a good German Pils.

42
Beer Travel / Re: Yondering
« on: August 12, 2016, 08:36:48 AM »
   Damn, I should have checked this last night before I headed to the taproom. I am in Yakima and visite YCB and Hop Nation. One of the beertenders at YCB said I could probably arrange for a tour of the brewery today, which I'm gonna try to do. I was planning on leaving town today, but that isn't set in stone, I would be very interested in touring the hop facility, and having a pint or three with you if we can get together. I'm a dinosaur and don't have text, I don't know if it's against forum policy to put my phone number on here. If you read this today let me know and I'll book the hotel for another night.
Use the message function above to message Steve with your number.

43
All Grain Brewing / Re: pH Effects?
« on: August 12, 2016, 08:34:04 AM »
MoreBeer doesnt sell sinimar, but I prefer to use grains.

Midnight Wheat and Carafa Special are supposed to be the least roasty.

Sinamar is grains...or was before they were mashed and fermented.
Denny, not fermented.
http://www.weyermann.de/eng/produkte.asp?idkat=26&umenue=yes&idmenue=&sprache=2

It is a color addition. On the tour I was on in Nov. they said Weyermann bought the company that made the extract in the 30s IIRC. The original wa sin Berlin.

Interesting.  I read a FAQ there yesterday that said they were.  Wonder if I can find it again?
i would be interested in that link. On the tour they said it started out as a food color additive.

Well found one from old Horst. How fermentable is an all Carafa wort? 0 DP, so what would convert?
http://byo.com/hops/item/1374-sinamar

44
When I first walked by a display of this beer in the grocery store with the slogan "top fermented" I laughed and my wife asked what was funny about that. My wife loves good beer but I wouldn't expect 95% of lovers of good beer to read between the lines and Strangeland knows this. Homebrewers are just not their target audience anymore. They know their market and understand that pilsners are kind of the "it" beer right now - particularly in the hot summer. They called a blonde ale a Pilsner and I would guess it sells better than it should because of that.

Contrast that with Circle Brewery in north Austin who makes a great, refreshing, clean, balanced blonde ale and calls it exactly that. I drink the hell out of that beer in the summer. In fact, it's an award winning beer (I know, that's faint praise for a blonde ale but it really is well executed).

Strangeland isn't the first brewery in Austin to not have a "beer first and foremost" attitude and it won't be the last.
So I have to ask, what is your opinion on Austin Beerworks Pearl Snap Pils?

As much as I like ABW as a place to hang out and have a few pints, I would not be surprised if Pearl Snap was hybrid/ale fermented. It's refreshing but there is something slightly off about it to me.
It has been recommended to me, once it may have been bad lines, the second time it was just not Pils like and uninspired.

45
When I first walked by a display of this beer in the grocery store with the slogan "top fermented" I laughed and my wife asked what was funny about that. My wife loves good beer but I wouldn't expect 95% of lovers of good beer to read between the lines and Strangeland knows this. Homebrewers are just not their target audience anymore. They know their market and understand that pilsners are kind of the "it" beer right now - particularly in the hot summer. They called a blonde ale a Pilsner and I would guess it sells better than it should because of that.

Contrast that with Circle Brewery in north Austin who makes a great, refreshing, clean, balanced blonde ale and calls it exactly that. I drink the hell out of that beer in the summer. In fact, it's an award winning beer (I know, that's faint praise for a blonde ale but it really is well executed).

Strangeland isn't the first brewery in Austin to not have a "beer first and foremost" attitude and it won't be the last.
So I have to ask, what is your opinion on Austin Beerworks Pearl Snap Pils?

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 508