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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3001
Equipment and Software / Re: Grain Mill
« on: November 16, 2014, 11:49:22 AM »
Use a square of some sorts when mounting your mm3. Will save you a bunch of headaches. After seeing all the carpentry work you have done, I'm sure you can handle it.

That is how I did it. Only used it once so far.

3002
Ingredients / Re: Homemade Flaked Rye
« on: November 15, 2014, 08:18:03 AM »
Thanks for the update. Another tweek to try someday.

3003
The higher pressure in big conicals results in lower ester formation. Just because a brewery runs their fermentation at X temp in a 400 or 800 bbl conical does not mean one should try that at home.

3004
Beer Recipes / Re: Celebrator
« on: November 13, 2014, 01:11:38 PM »
I would recemend WLP 833 which most authorities say came from Ayinger. It makes a really nice malty lager.

3005
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 13, 2014, 08:07:11 AM »
The difference between wild and domesticated yeast. By the way I like the idea of someone domesticating yeast...

Anyway, in homebrew terms I think wild means yeast from the surroundings (AKA cool ship) they kind of intentionally allowed in, where as unintentional would be called infection, or more precisely contamination.  Domesticated I suppose would indicate a strain that was cultured and pitched on purpose. Any yeast could be any of the 3. Think of brett. If you open ferment and some gets in, thats wild. If you close ferment and some gets in thats an infection. If you go to a LHBS and buy some brett to pitch, thats domesticated. Back to the discussion at hand, I doubt the sanitizer knows if its wild, contamination, or domesticated.
So wolves, bears, and large cats bred for generations on zoos are domesticated?

This might be an undomesticated rabbit trail, but I would say yes they are, to a degree. I wouldn't call them wild, or a contamination,  so that leaves domesticated. But thats just an opinion. Its been a long time since I've done much zooing

Just don't get in the enclosure next time at the zoo.

3006
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 13, 2014, 08:05:04 AM »
The difference between wild and domesticated yeast. By the way I like the idea of someone domesticating yeast...

Anyway, in homebrew terms I think wild means yeast from the surroundings (AKA cool ship) they kind of intentionally allowed in, where as unintentional would be called infection, or more precisely contamination.  Domesticated I suppose would indicate a strain that was cultured and pitched on purpose. Any yeast could be any of the 3. Think of brett. If you open ferment and some gets in, thats wild. If you close ferment and some gets in thats an infection. If you go to a LHBS and buy some brett to pitch, thats domesticated. Back to the discussion at hand, I doubt the sanitizer knows if its wild, contamination, or domesticated.
So wolves, bears, and large cats bred for generations on zoos are domesticated?

This might be an undomesticated rabbit trail, but I would say yes they are, to a degree. I wouldn't call them wild, or a contamination,  so that leaves domesticated. But thats just an opinion. Its been a long time since I've done much zooing

Just don't get in the enclosure next time at the zoo.

3007
The Pub / Re: What to read
« on: November 13, 2014, 07:56:50 AM »
I would also add anything by Graham Greene and anything by Cormac McCarthy.  Blood Meridian is phenomenal.  The Road bothered me for ages.  Still does.  All The Pretty Horses is great, despite the movie. 

Avoid D.H. Lawrence.  I labored for most of the summer with The Plumed Serpent.  I gave up.  Not a proud moment, but I only have so much time.
Cormac McCarthy writes books that haunt me too, but are so rewarding to read. I only got have way through the last border trilogy book because as the wife says, "ain't going to have a happy ending".

I also read all of Edward Abbey's stuff when I was knocking around the Canyons and lousy stinking desert in the 90s.

If anyone is into the Southwest, Craig Childs has some excellent books.

Blood Meridian is tough going. The violence in that book is mind boggling. I really enjoyed Sutree. I would also add anything by Flannery O'Connor is great. I reread most of Hemingway's short stories over the summer...still great. It is odd to me that Hemingway is now an underrated writer. I do enjoy reading Edward Abbey, although I haven't read too much of it. I'll have to check out Craig Childs.

"House of Rain" by Childs is a covers the Anasazi and where they probably went. I really enjoyed that as we had been to many sites. We also stopped at the Chimney Rock site in CO which was probably built to observe the lunar stand still.

Charles Bowden is another Southwestern author I enjoy. Similar to Abbey, but a little darker and very moody.


3008
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 12, 2014, 08:56:47 PM »
The difference between wild and domesticated yeast. By the way I like the idea of someone domesticating yeast...

Anyway, in homebrew terms I think wild means yeast from the surroundings (AKA cool ship) they kind of intentionally allowed in, where as unintentional would be called infection, or more precisely contamination.  Domesticated I suppose would indicate a strain that was cultured and pitched on purpose. Any yeast could be any of the 3. Think of brett. If you open ferment and some gets in, thats wild. If you close ferment and some gets in thats an infection. If you go to a LHBS and buy some brett to pitch, thats domesticated. Back to the discussion at hand, I doubt the sanitizer knows if its wild, contamination, or domesticated.
So wolves, bears, and large cats bred for generations on zoos are domesticated?

3009
The Pub / Re: What to read
« on: November 12, 2014, 07:50:41 PM »
I would also add anything by Graham Greene and anything by Cormac McCarthy.  Blood Meridian is phenomenal.  The Road bothered me for ages.  Still does.  All The Pretty Horses is great, despite the movie. 

Avoid D.H. Lawrence.  I labored for most of the summer with The Plumed Serpent.  I gave up.  Not a proud moment, but I only have so much time.
Cormac McCarthy writes books that haunt me too, but are so rewarding to read. I only got have way through the last border trilogy book bracause as the wife says, "ain't going to have a happy ending".

I also read all of Edward Abbey's stuff when I was knocking around the Canyons and lousy stinking desert in the 90s.

If anyone is into the Southwest, Craig Childs has some excellent books.

3010
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 12, 2014, 05:54:50 PM »
the fact that bleach corrodes stainless at the welds.

That's only true at chlorine levels greater than 500 ppm.

Really? For what grade stainless and contact time? 300.series is not that high.
http://www.bssa.org.uk/topics.php?article=38


 



3011
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Alpine is acquired by Green Flash
« on: November 10, 2014, 05:27:30 PM »
Alpine has been brewing some beers for kegs at GF for about a year.

With these "mergers" as the press release says, some is the winner and calls the shots, someone is the loser and sees the door eventually.

3012
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA Water profile
« on: November 10, 2014, 03:22:52 PM »
I prefer more sulfate in mine. 250-350 ppm

Yea, increasing the Sulfate a bit was my one thought. My only fear is that it would leave it tasting too dry.

I'm going for a juicy, low IBU, heavy aroma type pale ale similar to a HopHands where the oats result in a solid body.


So it's not an IPA like the title says?

Well it's a spinoff I suppose: Heavy on the late hops like an IPA (1.2lbs/BBL), dry-hopped like a Double IPA (~2lbs/bbl) but with body (from 15% oats in the grist) and relatively low IBUS's for the amount of aroma hops/OG (30 ibu's for a 1.050 OG). I suppose it fits the most as an APA style wise but the heavy late/dry hops make it drink more like a session IPA, just juicier.

How big is the batch? You could split the wort and add more gypsum to one fermenter. Heck, you can even add some to a glass and see what it does.

Edit - it is problematic to take the gypsum out!

3013
The Pub / Re: What to read
« on: November 10, 2014, 03:20:50 PM »
I always say give Jim Harrison a try. His latest was a collection of the Novellas that have his lovable screw up Brown Dog (or BD) as the main character.

3014
All Things Food / Re: Pretzels
« on: November 10, 2014, 03:15:44 PM »
The reason for lye or baking soda is to raise the pH so that you get more of the Maillard reaction to form the tasty brown skin on the pretzel.

Someday I will make some using this recipe.
http://aabg.org/2010/03/22/jeff-renners-pretzel-recipe/

man looks good!
Jeff's story on that recipe was that he got it from an old German guy who sold Pretzels outside of UM stadium before games years back.

3015
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Judging the NHC
« on: November 10, 2014, 08:32:20 AM »
Yes it is.

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