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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3016
Ingredients / Re: 6 Row uses?
« on: January 29, 2015, 05:46:29 PM »
Six row can also be used in making some old recipes like Ballantine IPA clones and many recipes out of "the Homebrewer's Guide to Vintage Beer" by Ron Pattinson.
Jeff, I have seen you post about Ballantine before, is your recipe similar to the recipe in Steele's IPA book?

Well, you can say it was similar, but it is different. I might have to post what I have been doing tomorrow.

I actually helped in brewing a 7 bbl batch of it at Arbor Brewing in Ann Arbor. It was a hit, and sold well as it was different, hoppy in different way, and more-ish.

3017
Ingredients / Re: lower cost bock
« on: January 29, 2015, 05:43:01 PM »
1) How much are you really going to save with these cheaper ingredients?

2) Is that difference really worth all the work to make what could be a sub par product?

You stated what I was thinking.

3018
Ingredients / Re: Flaked Barley
« on: January 29, 2015, 02:07:39 PM »
I use it in a Cream Ale recipe that is taken from Pelican Pub's Kiwanda Cream Ale.

3019
Ingredients / Re: 6 Row uses?
« on: January 29, 2015, 02:05:59 PM »
American Stock Ale and Kentucky Common Beer.

Did you go to the BJCP reception in GR? There were some good points on brewing a Kentucky Common. Not a sour mash beer at all.

3020
Ingredients / Re: 6 Row uses?
« on: January 29, 2015, 02:04:35 PM »
Six row can also be used in making some old recipes like Ballantine IPA clones and many recipes out of "the Homebrewer's Guide to Vintage Beer" by Ron Pattinson.
I need to add that to my library. I'm interested in how this domestic 2 row would work in English styles. They say their 2 row has a "subtle New England terroir". Not sure what that means but I'm interested in coming up with a recipe for a "New England" style ale with other local ingredients just for fun.
They say this about their 6 row: "This is not Cow feed but rather a beautiful 6-Row malt with a pleasant sweetness and that classic grainy / husky character though, more subtle than other examples. This malt is on par with Pale Ale and Pilsner in terms of quality. A unique flavor contribution to any beer and great base malt for styles where Pale Ale would be a major component."   
:

Ron Pattinson has said the 6-row in British beers was for increased Nitrogen, DP and FAN is what I took that to mean.

3021
Pimp My System / Re: Redbird Brewhouse - There's Always a Project
« on: January 29, 2015, 01:25:51 PM »
Step or HochKurtz double sometimes.

3022
Pimp My System / Re: Redbird Brewhouse - There's Always a Project
« on: January 29, 2015, 01:15:03 PM »
Oh yeah, as a follow up: I cranked it down to 0.039" gap. Doing no-sparge for a 5 gallon batch of ESB yielded 70%. I'll take it.

Wonder what I'll get with a single batch sparge? Hmm.

I'll bet on 80+ %.

I'll let you know when the weather gets nicer around here. Next batch is a 10 gallon batch of Pilsner. After all the wedding beers, I could probably brew a 10 gallon 1.050 beer with my eyes closed!  ;D

Yep, pils is pretty straight forward. Good stuff anyway !

The ingredients are straight forward, the procedures can be more complicated.

For sure. Fermentation and lagering definitely need to be managed well.
Sometimes mashing, too!

3023
Ingredients / Re: Brewing a CAP
« on: January 29, 2015, 01:13:37 PM »
I would assume that it is the before weight.

When I brew a CAP and use 6-row and corn meal, I want 80% 6-row, 20% corn meal, both dry. The corn meal will absorb water in the cereal mash, but so does the 6_row in the main mash.

3024
Equipment and Software / Re: Cleaning SS Immersion Chiller
« on: January 29, 2015, 11:58:56 AM »
Lots of area on those. Let us know how much it speeds the chilling.

3025
we have to keep doing these awards, so I can keep enjoying the annual BeerAdvocate threads b****ing about how wrong the winner list is.   ;D

It's a bunch of homebrewers' FAVORITE beers.  By definition my list isn't wrong, it's just MINE. 

Ima put Orval at the top of my list again.  Love that stuff.

cheers--
--Michael
As they would say in Germany, "every year, same procedure".

3026
Pimp My System / Re: Redbird Brewhouse - There's Always a Project
« on: January 29, 2015, 11:55:39 AM »
Oh yeah, as a follow up: I cranked it down to 0.039" gap. Doing no-sparge for a 5 gallon batch of ESB yielded 70%. I'll take it.

Wonder what I'll get with a single batch sparge? Hmm.

I'll bet on 80+ %.

I'll let you know when the weather gets nicer around here. Next batch is a 10 gallon batch of Pilsner. After all the wedding beers, I could probably brew a 10 gallon 1.050 beer with my eyes closed!  ;D

Yep, pils is pretty straight forward. Good stuff anyway !

The ingredients are straight forward, the procedures can be more complicated.

3027
Ingredients / Re: 6 Row uses?
« on: January 29, 2015, 11:54:23 AM »
Six row can also be used in making some old recipes like Ballantine IPA clones and many recipes out of "the Homebrewer's Guide to Vintage Beer" by Ron Pattinson.

3028
All Grain Brewing / Re: Martin B. is the man!
« on: January 28, 2015, 08:31:02 PM »
Is it just me or is anyone else managing mash PH by room temp, and it varies by recipe? Perhaps I'm just wasting time and energy and a consistent mash PH of 5.5-5.6 Room temp is the way to go??? If I wanted a more acidic wort In the kettle I'd just adjust down- and that would carry through with the hops and yeast PH drop that happens........not feeling like there's much in responses suggesting a best practice here.

It's an area ripe for experimentation.

I do like to get my German Pilsners in the %.2-5.3 range so they really "pop". Dark beers up around 5.5-5.6.

3029
All Grain Brewing / Re: Martin B. is the man!
« on: January 28, 2015, 01:09:18 PM »
There's definitely several things going on here. The first is the pH of the mash itself and how it relates to conversion. From what I understand, pH in the higher end of that range (~5.6 measured at room temp) leads to the best conversion in the mash. Secondly, there is the consideration that must be taken to keep the pH of the sparge from rising too high in order to minimize tannin extraction.


+1

Quote
Finally, there is the pH of the finished beer itself and how it relates to flavor. The numbers you're talking about really have more to do with this than the pH of the mash itself. Even though you're setting a specific mash pH for these beers, what you're really doing is targeting a final pH to get the flavor profile you're shooting for. For example, you like your wit's to finish with a lower pH than your dark beers. You're choosing to adjust your mash pH, which will result in a lower kettle pH, and a lower pH after fermentation. You could just as easily take a measurement of your finished beer and adjust the pH at that point, even if your mash pH was actually 5.6 instead of the 5.2 you normally shoot for.

This information is for the most part on the money.  What lot of brewers on this are failing to take into account is that one of the first things that a yeast culture does after pitching is lower the pH to below 4.5, sometimes even lower than 4.0.  How far a yeast culture lowers the pH of the medium is species and strain dependent.  This phenomenon is part of a yeast culture's defense mechanisms (which is one of the reasons why replacing the green beer in a yeast crop with boiled tap water is not a good idea).  Most of us have been told or have read that pathogens do not grow in beer.  The science behind this claim is that the growth of pathogens like Clostridium botulinum (the bacterium that causes boutilism) is inhibited below 4.6 pH.

And why pickled foods are safe to eat, low pH.

3030
The Pub / Re: Elysian Just sold to Anheuser-Busch
« on: January 28, 2015, 08:48:08 AM »
not my point. My point is that the idea that a major buys up a craft and it 'stays the same' is only true to the extent that incremental adjustment must be slow enough to allow the customer to adapt their expectations. People didn't start wanting less hops in their bud because their tastes just inexplicably changed. Their expectations were handled through careful application of incremental change. We all drink goose island and say "it's still good" and as long as one generation is never so far from the last that we say, "jeez goose island tastes kind cheap and ricey lately doesn't it?" costs can be lowered. I don't know the history of fat tire recipe, perhaps it has changed and that's why people think less of it today but I expect it's that a) You personally think less of it because your palate has changed over the years and b) the palate of the 'average' craft beer drinker has shifted over the years. That's a different thing than AB slowly reducing the level of hopping in bud over the course of decades to cut production costs without admitting to their customer base that the beer was getting less and less tasty, the whole while pointing at customer desire as the reason for their low level of flavor.

I'm not so sure you can blame the drift away from hops in bud on manipulation by AB. If you look at the 1940s-1980s there was a drift away across the board from flavorful foods and bitter foods towards foods with high salt and sugar content and otherwise fairly bland. You can track those changes through other foods. You don't see the wedge salad become a popular item on menus in the 80s unless people wanted to consume complete blandness. AB sure steered into the skid on that one with their advertising and product adjustment but they can't be singularly blamed for it happening.

Bitterness used to be a component in food stuffs, and some of those have made a comeback - thinking of arugula. I also remember horehound candies as being bitter, the Grandparents always had some on hand.

Sour foods were also more common, as pickling was a way to preserve foods.


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