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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3046
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast starter time question
« on: November 02, 2014, 12:02:38 PM »
Yes Arcadia uses Ringwood. One of the Brewers said it was a "Fussy b****" in that it would require more attention some times, ie rousing.

Grizzly Peak in Ann Arbor had a Pugsley system and would struggle with Diacetyl. They changed to Essex and the beers are much improved. They open ferment and top crop. The problem is they don't have the tank time for a long D rest, they were doing close to 1600 barrels on a 7 barrel system. WLP -022 produces clean beer for them.

Real Ringwood is a Yorkshire square multi-strain yeast culture that requires rousing and aeration during fermentation, or it will tend to produce a diacetyl bomb.  While the culture is named after the microbrewery Peter Austin built after he retired from the Hull Brewery, Ringwood originally came from Webster's Brewery (a.k.a. the Fountain Head Brewery) in Halifax, West Riding, Yorkshire.   

If one examines a Peter Austin designed/Alan Pugsley installed brewery closely, one finds a device that I like to refer to as a Yorkshire shower head.  This device is used to rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation (yes, I said rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation), as can be seen at time 0:12 in this video shot at the Blacksheep Brewery in North Yorkshire: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJmLNj14C_w.   It can also be seen in the following video, which was shot a Peter Austin designed /Alan Pugsley built brew pub in Baltimore, Maryland: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGIThQ7w0ls (the device is also used to aerate wort).
Arcadia has the Pugsley system, I don't know if it is still in Battle Creek or at the new production brewery in Kalamazoo. The next time I see the brewer I will ask her more specifics on her feelings about Ringwood.

She said the pumps had to be turned on (not sure she said when), as the years drops in 3 days if done or not.

The best time for them to top crop was at 1.022. They thought they would have the timing figured out, but sometimes it would be much earlier, which had some stories associated.

After fermentation, she said the beer had to be kept away from O2 to the point that they would purge the tanks and transfer lines. Just a little air would create diacetyl from the leftover precursors.

There was a much that had to be done to make beer with low diacetyl, according to her. 

3047
Ingredients / Re: Is Wet Hopping BS?
« on: November 01, 2014, 05:39:27 PM »
Founders Harvest is grassy this year, but Mrs. R. liked it.

Arcadia Cannonball Gold was not grassy and we both liked it. Had it at the production brewery in Kalamazoo, and we tasted 3 versions, with wet hops from 3 small farms. The one from Hop Head Farms in Hickory Corners near Kalamazoo was the one we liked best.

Jeff, have you tried the wet hopped ale from 51 North Brewery in Lake Orion? I thought it was very good; not grassy at all.
I am sorry to say we have not been there . It is on our radar, but it is one of those you can't get there fr on here places. An hour for 29 miles is a deterrent
.

3048
Ingredients / Re: Is Wet Hopping BS?
« on: October 31, 2014, 08:20:49 AM »
Founders Harvest is grassy this year, but Mrs. R. liked it.

Arcadia Cannonball Gold was not grassy and we both liked it. Had it at the production brewery in Kalamazoo, and we tasted 3 versions, with wet hops from 3 small farms. The one from Hop Head Farms in Hickory Corners near Kalamazoo was the one we liked best.

3049
Equipment and Software / Re: Wort grant?
« on: October 31, 2014, 07:32:42 AM »
I have a 5 gallon kettle that I sometimes use as a grant if the grain bill will be sticky. It helps.


3050
The Pub / Re: Postdoc Brewing
« on: October 31, 2014, 07:26:21 AM »
That will a stop on our next PNW trip.

3051
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Yeast Affects Beer
« on: October 30, 2014, 01:07:29 PM »
Many breweries use the Chico strain. I am not sure that one would think that SN , Russian River,  and Founders all taste alike.

SN uses the same 2.row and C60 as the base for most of their ales. The water would be treated the same. Their beers have a house flavor, but it is the sum of yeast, ingredients, and process being similar.
I was primarily referring to yeast strains that impart flavor :)

I was replying to Jim, who brought up SN.

No argument that certain British strains are distinctive and impart a house flavor. Some Belgian strains immediately bring the brewery to mind, WY-3787 and I go Mmmm Westmalle!

Without question "house character" is more that merely yeast.  But it is a major player. SN Ovila Quad comes to mind. I would not know that was a SN beer but for the label.
There was a nice presentation at the 2011 NHC on the development of that Ovila line of beers.

3052
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: October 30, 2014, 06:14:45 AM »
this is why i installed an RO system.

my well water:

pH                                            8.0
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 283
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.47
Cations / Anions, me/L 5.3 / 5.4
ppm
Sodium, Na           114
Potassium, K          2
Calcium, Ca            4
Magnesium, Mg       1
Total Hardness, CaCO3 14
Nitrate, NO3-N          0.1 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S          3
Chloride, Cl              3
Carbonate,CO3         6
Bicarbonate, HCO3      297
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3   253

High sodium, high bicarbonate. Does the city soften the water? Or maybe there is a baking soda mine in town?

3053
Ingredients / Re: Homemade Flaked Rye
« on: October 30, 2014, 05:31:35 AM »
Had some extra raw rye and wanted to use it in a different way.

Let us know how this works for you.

3054
All Grain Brewing / Re: Wee Heavy extended boil time?
« on: October 29, 2014, 06:44:25 PM »
I think that really answers the question I so poorly worded. Where in the boil to add the reduced first runnings. Thanks jeff

The timing was such that it went in during the last 5 or 10 minutes to be more exact.
While we're talking practice, I kill the heat on the side boil, then I ladle in a pint or two of the main boil to cool/thin/deglaze the syrup. Does anyone else do this, or are you just dumping it right into the main boil? Also, I just add it to the boil whenever it's ready, rather than waiting until the end.

That is an excellent procedure!

3055
All Grain Brewing / Re: Wee Heavy extended boil time?
« on: October 29, 2014, 01:39:00 PM »

Denny, you know how long, roughly, it takes you to boil that down?

IIRC, 1-2 hours.  But it obviously will depend on boil vigor, pot geometry, etc.

I haven't done it many times, but one gallon goes into a 5 gallon pot, and the flame is turn up. The reduction is ready to add by the end of boil.
I think that really answers the question I so poorly worded. Where in the boil to add the reduced first runnings. Thanks jeff

The timing was such that it went in during the last 5 or 10 minutes to be more exact.

3056
Equipment and Software / Re: HERMS and stuck mash
« on: October 29, 2014, 11:39:52 AM »
The suction from the pump, even when throttled, can result in an appreciable force when multiplied by the false bottom area. You void even be causing the bottom of the cooler to deform up. A castelated nut on the bottom should help maintain flow.

Is there much chance the local hardware store will have a castellated/slotted nut of the right type (1/2" NPS)? Do you think it would be adequate to make cuts with my dremel tool cutting disks or will they be too thin?

You might phone them and ask.

Looking at the picture, it might be worth a try to loosen the jamb nut on top, back the elbow out a couple of guns, then tighten the jamb nut. That shoul give clearance so it is worth a try.

3057
All Grain Brewing / Re: Wee Heavy extended boil time?
« on: October 29, 2014, 11:21:47 AM »
Denny, you know how long, roughly, it takes you to boil that down?

IIRC, 1-2 hours.  But it obviously will depend on boil vigor, pot geometry, etc.

I haven't done it many times, but one gallon goes into a 5 gallon pot, and the flame is turn up. The reduction is ready to add by the end of boil.

3058
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Yeast Affects Beer
« on: October 29, 2014, 11:18:24 AM »
Many breweries use the Chico strain. I am not sure that one would think that SN , Russian River,  and Founders all taste alike.

SN uses the same 2.row and C60 as the base for most of their ales. The water would be treated the same. Their beers have a house flavor, but it is the sum of yeast, ingredients, and process being similar.
I was primarily referring to yeast strains that impart flavor :)

I was replying to Jim, who brought up SN.

No argument that certain British strains are distinctive and impart a house flavor. Some Belgian strains immediately bring the brewery to mind, WY-3787 and I go Mmmm Westmalle!

3059
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Yeast Affects Beer
« on: October 29, 2014, 10:22:54 AM »
Many breweries use the Chico strain. I am not sure that one would think that SN , Russian River,  and Founders all taste alike.

SN uses the same 2.row and C60 as the base for most of their ales. The water would be treated the same. Their beers have a house flavor, but it is the sum of yeast, ingredients, and process being similar.

3060
Equipment and Software / Re: Aluminum Pot Oxidation
« on: October 29, 2014, 07:09:17 AM »
I was always told to never use aluminum because it will impart off flavors in the wort.

That may be true if you started with a freshly scrubbed kettle that was shiny and bright. But if you start with an oxidized dull gray surface like shown above, there is no chance of metallic flavor.  My kettle now has a tea-colored finish to it. I only scrub to the degree necessary to remove trub, never hard enough to remove the patina. Aluminum is well suited to homebrewing use.  Its not suited for kettles that get scrubbed and polished, like in a commercial brewery.

Aluminum's oxide layer will not stand up to the caustics that breweries use when they CIP.

One should not go too acidic with aluminum either. Boiling wort is fine as it is only mildly acidic, but cooking tomatoes in aluminum will also damage the oxide layer. 

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