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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3106
Going Pro / Re: Beer volume vs. Profit margin.
« on: January 12, 2013, 02:46:49 PM »
I didn't read the articles, but here's my attempt at some quick math:

Half of 14000bbl is 7000bbl.

7000bbl=14,000 kegs

14000/365 = 38 kegs worth of beer a day

That is a LOT of beer being sold at a pub.

My guess is that less than half the beer being made is sold at the pub, but more than half of total sales is made there (food, merchandise, etc.)

They are always packed, but I don't know the amount of beer they sell. They also move some food, hats, and Shirts


3107
I will agree with Martin and others that Pickling Lime is the stuff to use when you need to raise alkalinity.

As for chalk, even at beer pH it will dissolve very slowly, and mash pH is higher, and we only mash for an hour or 90 minutes. Chalk does not dissolve easily in water, think about the White Cliffs of Dover which touch the English Channel. Those are still there last I heard. :)

3108
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hop production in North Carolina
« on: January 11, 2013, 02:29:51 PM »
Thanks Steve, maybe someday if I can swing the trip out there. The bucket list keeps getting longer.

3109
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hop production in North Carolina
« on: January 11, 2013, 01:51:06 PM »
The OCB says commercial hops are grown between 30 and 52 degrees. The 52 would be inclusive of the Worcestershire hops region in England. I don't know what the 30 would include.

45 - 55 includes the European fields, and that may be the Haas groups viewpoint. I am interested if you tell us more about the Haas Hops Academy. A little envy too.

For Nateo - wine grapes were grown as far north as Scotland, then the Little Ice Age happened.

30-40 would include South Africa, Argentina, Australia, and NZ (the north island, anyway. I'm not sure where they grow hops in NZ).

I've read about people planting wine grapes again in Scotland. I don't think it's really taken off yet.
North end of the south Island. There are towns named Nelson, Riwaka, Matueka so it must be the area, -41.7. Australia is in Tasmania and Victoria, also about that latitude.

3110
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hop production in North Carolina
« on: January 11, 2013, 12:34:55 PM »
The OCB says commercial hops are grown between 30 and 52 degrees. The 52 would be inclusive of the Worcestershire hops region in England. I don't know what the 30 would include.

45 - 55 includes the European fields, and that may be the Haas groups viewpoint. I am interested if you tell us more about the Haas Hops Academy. A little envy too.

For Nateo - wine grapes were grown as far north as Scotland, then the Little Ice Age happened.

3111
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Soapy off flavor
« on: January 11, 2013, 11:39:41 AM »
Yeah, autolysis usually tastes "meaty" to me, but supposedly the fatty acids that the yeast spill out into the beer resembles the molecular structure of soap .... or some BS like that. ;)
I've never gotten soapy from autolysis either, but then I think significant autolysis off flavors in beer are really rare.  I've left yeast on plates for a long time though, and they have never smelled soapy.  Meaty or brothy is a better description, although in my case at least some of that is from the media.

Anyway, fatty acids can be involved in the formation of esters and aldehydes and such.  Fatty acid salts are soap-like from a chemical standpoint, but they are also fairly insoluble so it doesn't seem likely to carry over to aroma.

I really think when people say "soapy" they mean "perfumey in a way that reminds me of scented soap", because plain soap has virtually no smell.  I think it is linalool.  It is used widely in soaps, perfumes, and cleaning products, is present in cilantro, coriander, and hops (and some people think they smell soapy), and is also present in yeast.  If autolysis smells soapy to some people, I think it's probably the linalool or a related molecule.  Different sensitivities to different forms of terpene alcohols could explain why some people find it offensive at certain levels that others find it wonderful.

I have meet a few that hate cilantro, as all they taste is soap due to their genetics.

3112
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hop production in North Carolina
« on: January 11, 2013, 11:30:04 AM »
At roughly 35* N. latitude they are significantly out of the band of 45-55 degrees which will result in poor hop cone maturation.  Obviously that would effect flavor, but I doubt that it would ever become in vogue.  Or commercially profitable for that matter.

But maybe they are experimenting with varieties that are modified to develop normally outside the prefered band - who knows?

Steve

You do know that commercial hops were grown in SF at one time, Sacramento, and Sonoma county? These are in the 37-38 parallel range. The reason they are not grown now is real estate in SF and Sacramento, and wine growing in Sonoma. CA is covered at some length in the Hop Atlas.

They stopped growing hops in Sonoma County around 1960 or a little before due to downy mildew and the other agronomic pressures.  For proof there is this place.

http://www.hopkilnwinery.com/home/

3113
The Pub / Re: Why does Budweiser just not get it?
« on: January 11, 2013, 10:30:37 AM »
I agree with everyone that have pointed out that with ~90+% market share the big boys don't need to react just yet. 
Yep. That's just what Newspaper's thought about the internet. Then they found out it was it too late.

Corp. mindset. They have more like 80-85% of the market when you include regionals not in the B.A. figures and imports. Many of the popular imports are owned by ABInbev and Miller-Coors, so you have to consider that.

3114
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: travelling with lots of beer
« on: January 10, 2013, 06:21:12 PM »
You can find a scale for weighing your checked bags. You might be surprised how much beer you can fit into a checked bag. Just saying from experience.

3115
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Soapy off flavor
« on: January 10, 2013, 11:38:44 AM »
Noonan stated that higher sulfate levels balance hop soapy flavors.

"Hoppy beers sometimes have an unpleasant soapy flavor. Calcium sulfate eliminates soapy flavors and accentuates a clean, piquant hop bitterness."

http://www.byo.com/stories/article/indices/56-water/313-brewing-water-tips-from-the-pros

I'm betting you hit the nail. I have not had my water tested in a long, long time and the local water is sourced differently.

You could add some gypsum to water to dissolve well, then do a little experiment adding sulfated water to a pint.

I was wondering if I could just add the gypsum directly to the pint, but I'll try the dissolving idea. Thanks!

I would try and get a high ppm dissolved, so that you don't dilute the beer too much when you add the solution. Though I am now thinking it might be too much dilution. Another thing is to put some gypsum in a bottle, add the beer, cap it so you can shake to disolve. Let it settle down for a day or so, then taste.

Let us know if this works.

3116
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Soapy off flavor
« on: January 10, 2013, 11:06:33 AM »
Noonan stated that higher sulfate levels balance hop soapy flavors.

"Hoppy beers sometimes have an unpleasant soapy flavor. Calcium sulfate eliminates soapy flavors and accentuates a clean, piquant hop bitterness."

http://www.byo.com/stories/article/indices/56-water/313-brewing-water-tips-from-the-pros

I'm betting you hit the nail. I have not had my water tested in a long, long time and the local water is sourced differently.

You could add some gypsum to water to dissolve well, then do a little experiment adding sulfated water to a pint.

3117
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Soapy off flavor
« on: January 10, 2013, 09:46:22 AM »
Noonan stated that higher sulfate levels balance hop soapy flavors.

"Hoppy beers sometimes have an unpleasant soapy flavor. Calcium sulfate eliminates soapy flavors and accentuates a clean, piquant hop bitterness."

http://www.byo.com/stories/article/indices/56-water/313-brewing-water-tips-from-the-pros

3118
Kegging and Bottling / Re: co2 tank filling
« on: January 10, 2013, 08:16:36 AM »
so i recently picked up a 10lbs tank from my local homebrew store, and payed $21 for a fill, only to hook it up and find the next day after carbonating the regulator has dropped to the order soon marking, which stumbled me, because i tested for any leaks before storing it in a cold environment (garage) should i go back and ask them to fill it back up?

The pressure drops if cold, you didn't say how cold your garage is. You can warm it up and see if the temp brings the pressure up.

3119
Homebrew Competitions / Re: BJCP tasting score
« on: January 10, 2013, 08:13:36 AM »
Is it normally in March or May?  Their website says March but the W.E.B. site says May. Guess I will wait and see if they reply.
Thanks again for the lead.

The homebrew competition is the first of March this year. Judging takes place upstairs at a brewpub, and is  petty good time.

The World Expo of Beer is the commercial beer tasting/judging that takes place in May. I have never been to that one.

3120
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hop production in North Carolina
« on: January 10, 2013, 08:05:43 AM »
A friend had luck growing hops in Florence, SC.

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