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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3136
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Clear Beer!
« on: March 26, 2015, 01:21:58 AM »
That is nice, Amanda. How is it?

3137
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: try at batch sparging
« on: March 26, 2015, 01:20:54 AM »
Well, I did a batch sparge of a Janet's Brown on Ale on Sunday, and a Big American BW on Tuesday. Both were 10 gallon batches.

I think Batch sparging can save time, but around 15 minutes for a 10 gallon batch of a reasonable gravity beer - the heating of the wort is the critical path. On Sunday most everything went to script, and it was about 4.5 hours, and I left the system in place once cleaned as I was brewing again soon. My previous fly sparge record was 4.5 hour for a 1.038 bitter, but there was less to heat up and so on, and that day included clean up and put away.

The BW was more involved and the day was longer. Had a few problems with hitting temps, so had to add heat and so on. A long boil off to hit the target, but it was not a bad day, and the beer should be good. The 70 qt. cooler let me mash 42 lbs, so I hit a little higher gravity than with the keggle with false bottom mash tun.

Having done both, I can see why people like one or the other. It comes down to what you are comfortable with, your equipment, and what works.

Guys in the club make good beer on many systems, so it is the brewer/brewster and how they make the system work for them.


3138
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: step infusion mash for german pils
« on: March 26, 2015, 01:04:02 AM »
Direct fired kettles with a false bottom and a pump to recirculate make step mashes pretty danged easy!

3139
All Grain Brewing / Re: Decoction - The Toast Test
« on: March 26, 2015, 01:00:44 AM »
Sure, if water is present, however in a very dry decoction with a very low to no volume of wort on the bottom of the kettle, it is conceivable that caramelization does in fact occur.
Can you give references to back that up?

Even in vigorous boils, you have about +10C on the kettle surface, so about 230F at best. We are in the nucleate boiling regime. If you get hotter, well that takes alot of heat flux, and you get into the Leidenfrost boiling and film boiling ranges - not good.

German brewers that decoct mash thin and pump a slurry over - grain and liquid.

3140
All Grain Brewing / Re: Decoction - The Toast Test
« on: March 26, 2015, 12:54:14 AM »
Another purpose of the decoction mash is to attempt to extract more starches (and proteins!) than can be had by simple infusion.  That point seems to be left by the wayside and is perhaps not as well tested.

Running a decoction mash using a strainer to pull the decoctions would be an interesting take.  In doing so, a good thick mash should be had, combined with constant stirring - a very malty flavor would be developed ::Shocked:: along with a mass of caramel ;)

I'm neither for or against a decoction, just attempting to look at it through the critical eyes of a scientific point of view - What really happens during a mash boil?

As an aside, I'd like to know how the whole 'decoctions make for a maltier beer' thing got started.

On the strainer thing - that is how we do it. You do need to get some liquid in there too.

3141
All Grain Brewing / Re: Decoction - The Toast Test
« on: March 25, 2015, 01:16:52 PM »
The gelatinization temperature of malted barley is in the 65F range, which is why we can single infusion mash. Decoction heat explodes the smallest starch granules, which makes that starch available for conversion.

Caramelization requires high heat and low moisture. Fructose caramalizes at 230, other sugars above 320F.

Maillard reactions proceed at high pH, more above 7, and at low moisture. There are exceptions, long boils of wort produce Maillard reactions, and that case is mentioned as an example in "On Food and Cooking" by Harold Magee.

The toast analogy is one I use to describe various grains and their color and taste, as everyone knows toast.

3142
Beer Recipes / Re: Stone releases official Levitation Ale recipe
« on: March 24, 2015, 09:53:35 PM »
Pale ale 2.0 will will feature Mandarina Bavaria.

3143
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WY2278 in a BoPils?
« on: March 24, 2015, 06:39:33 PM »
There was an event at the World of Beer bar chain that had unfiltered-unpasteurized PU kegs flown over. Dang that was a good beer. Guess what - no Diacetyl!

I would be happy just to have the opportunity to taste non-skunked PU. 

Yeah, I'd love to try that.
Pilsner Urquell is in brown bottles now...I was surprised to find out it's not as, or at all, skunky.


Yes the 12 packs in the closed cardboard containers with the brown bottles are pretty darn good.

FWIW, when I visited the PU brewery in Pilsen  in 2002 and they gave you the tour with the old oak vat fermentors, and they pour you a sample out of those vats, it has a little diacetyl.  I suspect the yeast in the keg that Jeff got cleaned up the diacetyl during the voyage over the pond.

Jeff Renner, who is hyper-sensitive to Diacetyl, said he got no Diacetyl in the ones in Pilsen out of the vat last fall or the one at WoB. There is probably some batch variation, or how long the beer has been in the vat. If you got a hint, it was there.

The adds from PU and WoB showed wood kegs of beer. The reality was a 50 liter European SS sanke keg.

3144
Many beers with high rates of Simcoe, Citra, other New World hops are just cat pee to my wife. She is much more sensitive to it. I get the pine and fruit.



+1.  It's funny how differently people perceive hop aromas. Occasionally I'll pick up a slight cattiness from Simcoe, but mostly pine and fruit as well. I get none from Citra. But I'm really sensitive to the onion/garlic thing, which I strongly dislike.
I don't get cat pee at all, just blackcurrant skin. But I'm the same way with the onion/garlic/Asiago thing. Anything more than the faintest hint and the beer starts to become savory to me and I can't bring myself to drink it.

I'm curious to see what others will think of Wai-iti once it starts becoming more widely available in the US. I just get straight up, concentrated blackcurrant from that hop. I wonder if others will get a lot of cat pee from that one.
I've never skinned a blackcurrent and imagine it's very tedious. And anyway, it's very difficult to get fresh blackcurrents in the US, so I always wonder where descriptors like that come from.

Black currants are in the ribe family, and the leaves are catty when disturbed. Yeah, here it is.
http://www.flavoractiv.com/products/catty-beer-flavour-standard/

Black currants also spread the white pine blister disease. Michigan was known for the stands of huge white pines that were logged off in the 1800s. The rust has been a problem to those coming back.
http://www.bughillfarm.org/blackcurrants.cfm

Some in the club say that some farms are grandfathered here, but new planting is not allowed. That is all I know.

Well that, and Schramm's Black Agnes mead made with high amounts of Black Currants is killer! I do know that.

3145
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: step infusion mash for german pils
« on: March 24, 2015, 01:34:44 AM »

Pretty much been doing that schedule for years. It works, the Alpha rest at 158-160F will really help the head retention.

As far as water, that will make something more like a southern Bavarian Pils, it will be not so dry and lingering in the finish.

So fair to expect the lower FG around 1.010 or so? I'm usually targeting my water with a little more sulfate and chloride, but thought I would give it a try and see how it turns out.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I get around that with all Pils malt. I don't use any other malts.

3146
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Beer Camp Hoppy Lager
« on: March 24, 2015, 01:32:47 AM »
I finally found a 12-pack of this beer.

This is more along the lines of what I'd consider a good session IPA. Sure it's 6%ish, but it's tasty enough that you can sip on it for a while before going back to another.

Only disappointment is an odd mineral sort of flavor. I noticed in a pack of Oscar Blues Pinner I bought the other day. Wonder if mishandling has degraded the flavors of these beers enough that a mineral taste comes through more...
On a tour of the SN Mills River facility, they said the lagers were being brewed there for now. Really mineral free water that was ideal for many lager styles was given as one reason. 1600 bbl fermenters that they could fill and let lager was another.

3147
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: step infusion mash for german pils
« on: March 23, 2015, 11:30:16 PM »
Pretty much been doing that schedule for years. It works, the Alpha rest at 158-160F will really help the head retention.

As far as water, that will make something more like a southern Bavarian Pils, it will be not so dry and lingering in the finish.

3148
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WY2278 in a BoPils?
« on: March 23, 2015, 09:07:20 PM »
That unfiltered and unpasteurized PU came at a price, $8.50 for 500 ml, but it was happy hour, so I got it for $7.50.  ;D

Is that price supposed to make one happy? :)
Got the super big happy hour discount. The beers were flown from Plzen. It was cheaper than me going on a trip to Plzen.

3149
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WY2278 in a BoPils?
« on: March 23, 2015, 08:01:12 PM »
There was an event at the World of Beer bar chain that had unfiltered-unpasteurized PU kegs flown over. Dang that was a good beer. Guess what - no Diacetyl!

I would be happy just to have the opportunity to taste non-skunked PU. 

Yeah, I'd love to try that.
That unfiltered and unpasteurized PU came at a price, $8.50 for 500 ml, but it was happy hour, so I got it for $7.50.  ;D

3150
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WY2278 in a BoPils?
« on: March 23, 2015, 05:35:23 PM »
There was an event at the World of Beer bar chain that had unfiltered-unpasteurized PU kegs flown over. Dang that was a good beer. Guess what - no Diacetyl! I didn't get it, but a National Judge in the club who was next to me at the bar didn't get it either. It was a Czech Kellerbier, still hazy from the yeast, so the yeast had cleaned up. Another National level judge from the club who is hyper sensitive to the D says that he did not pick it up either.

For the production PU, it has been said it is cold crashed, so the yeast must be dropping before it is done cleaning up.

That's pretty interesting. Sounds like the slight diacetyl isn't so much desired in the Czech beers over there,  maybe stemming more from PU's (maybe too quick) crashing ?

I have read that the brewery has found out that the sales go up a little if they increase the diacetyl level in the production beer.

Edited to correct autocorrect.

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