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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3151
All Grain Brewing / Re: Sparging Water Volume
« on: January 04, 2015, 06:43:25 PM »
Jeff, you raise an ominous specter. Now I'm going to have to do some cross-checking on my refractometer too. As mentioned, this may be more reason to end the runoff earlier.

Extra testing for the next brew.

You did point out a little astringency on my German Pilsner that got a Bronze at the 2011 NHC. It was noticed when I sat down and read the scoring. I have been chasing it for a long time, maybe now I have a clue!

3152
All Grain Brewing / Re: Sparging Water Volume
« on: January 04, 2015, 06:40:53 PM »
Jeff, you raise an ominous specter. Now I'm going to have to do some cross-checking on my refractometer too. As mentioned, this may be more reason to end the runoff earlier.

Extra testing for the next brew.

Once you calibrate the refract and know its reading correctly. I also test it against my hydrometer at the proper temp and they are usually spot on. Good luck!1

Have you done a serial dilution of a known Brix to make sure it is linear at low Brix? The old one had been dropped and abused several times, but last I checked was fine at 15 Brix. Didn't take it down to 1 to 4 Brix.

Some will say putting water on and setting to zero is calibrating. That is zeroing, but what about slope and linearity?

3153
All Grain Brewing / Re: Sparging Water Volume
« on: January 04, 2015, 06:40:24 PM »
Jeff, you raise an ominous specter. Now I'm going to have to do some cross-checking on my refractometer too. As mentioned, this may be more reason to end the runoff earlier.

Extra testing for the next brew.

Once you calibrate the refract and know its reading correctly. I also test it against my hydrometer at the proper temp and they are usually spot on. Good luck!1

Have you done a serial dilution of a known Brix to make sure it is linear at low Brix? The old one had been dropped and abused several times, but last I checked was fine at 15 Brix. Didn't take it down to 1 to 4 Brix.

Some will say putting water on and setting to zero is calibrating. That is zeroing, but what about slope and linearity?

3154
All Grain Brewing / Re: Sparging Water Volume
« on: January 04, 2015, 03:51:24 PM »
On Friday a Vienna was brewed, most things went well and I cut the sparge at 3 Brix. Tasted the runnings and those had tannins! I acidify my RO sparge water to 5.5 (about 2 drops of phosphoric), temperature was not too high. I recently bought a new refractometer, not sure how accurate it is as I have not calibrated it. The new refractometer measured 1 Brix!

I think this is why I have had some low level tannins going on for a long time, the gravity was lower than indicated on the last runnings.

What to do? Make a solution of water and sugar, do a serial dilution and plot the curves for the 2 refractometers and the hydrometer, indicated Brix/SG vs actual. I might have to break down and get a finishing hydrometer for the lower Brix readings.

3155
Beer Recipes / Re: Thoughts on a barley wine... Need advice
« on: January 04, 2015, 03:27:55 PM »
Simpson's GP has a malty sweet taste as it is about 2.0L. Thomas Fawcett GP is around 3.5L and has a little more of the toasty malty taste.

I think GP and MO work well together in an English Barleywine. The one that I brewed last June used those, along with a little NA 2 row, as I was a little low on the MO and GP.

3156
The Pub / Re: Drama at Balcones
« on: January 04, 2015, 07:07:36 AM »
This one came out a while back. Similar stories are told in the Craft beer industry.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/28/business/how-dreams-and-money-didnt-mix-at-a-texas-distillery.html?_r=0

Edit - same article.

3157
Events / Re: NHC 2015 San Diego. Changes to Registration
« on: January 03, 2015, 08:09:58 PM »
How many people have attended in previous years?

I'm hesitant to book a flight if there is a chance I won't be allowed to attend...

This will be number 10 for me.

The conference did not sell out last year (2014). This year in San Diego, who knows?

You will see many with tickets for sale on this forum as it get near to the conference, as life happens and some will not be able to make it.

3158
Ingredients / Re: Boil time for all late hopped beer
« on: January 03, 2015, 08:18:40 AM »
I have done lid on and lid off, no difference as far as I can tell. The temp is allowed to drop, but for a 10 gallon batch it does not drop too much as far as i am concerned.

3159
Ingredients / Re: Boil time for all late hopped beer
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:53:48 AM »
Has anyone experienced DMS as a result of a hop stand?  If not, why?  Any theories?

None detected and I am sensitive to it. A rolling long boil is used to drive it off.

3160
The Pub / Re: Beer brewers vs beer "architects" in Belgium
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:38:47 AM »

Why does it matter? Unless I'm missing something, house brand and contract produced food doesn't need to be labeled with where it was made. What makes beer different?
Probably close to why food has nutritional information and ingredients on the label, not true for beer.
Beer is under TTB regulations, food is the FDA.
But that doesn't answer why the labeling is needed. I don't care where Trader Joes has their orange chicken made, why should I car where they have their beer made.

Good question, the answer maybe something from a long time ago.

3161
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water options
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:37:00 AM »
I had my softened water tested and its only 65 ppm sodium. That's fine for almost everything. I don't have anywhere nearby that has RO water and distilled only by the gallon. So I add back what brun water recommends for the beer I'm making.

This is a good point, know what is in the water. Maine has some pretty good water to begin with, so not much ion exchange would happen between Ca-Mg and Na. My soft water would probably be very high in Na, as the hardness is very high.

The blanket statement on not using soft water may not be absolute.

3162
The Pub / Re: Beer brewers vs beer "architects" in Belgium
« on: January 03, 2015, 07:32:06 AM »
Why does it matter? Unless I'm missing something, house brand and contract produced food doesn't need to be labeled with where it was made. What makes beer different?
Probably close to why food has nutritional information and ingredients on the label, not true for beer.
Beer is under TTB regulations, food is the FDA.

3163
Ingredients / Re: Cluster and Onion
« on: January 02, 2015, 05:50:08 PM »
I have to agree with Jon on this one.  Terroir and growing season play a huge role when it comes to growing Cluster.  I am drinking a British-style IPA that I made with 100% 2014 Puterbaugh Farms (the farm that owns Hops Direct) whole Cluster (bittering charge and sub-180F hopstand), TF Pearl, a dash of Cara Munich, and a mystery British ale strain that I acquired from U.C. Davis.  It is a delightful pint. 

With that said, I have received Cluster in the past from other brokers that was pure litter box.  I have not received any Cluster that reeked of onion, which leads me to believe that you may have a Cluster/native hybrid.  The only way to know for certain is to have the cones analyzed.

Fresh Cluster is a fine hop, and Hopsdirect may have the best that homebrewers can get. The catty aroma and flavor come in when old.

Most things I have seen say that the onion/garlic is harvest time related. The hybrid thing is a possibility.

3164
Ingredients / Re: When to use hop substitutions.
« on: January 01, 2015, 07:29:16 PM »
Yes the oils are volatile and flash off, when you dump them in the boil and the room fills with hoppy goodness, that is the oils leaving the party.

You can look at the numbers in this publication for each hop, and go by the averages for a hops oil. Then compare with your subs and adjust the amounts to match the oils for 1 oz. For example, Citra has high oil content, if I wanted to sub Mosaic, I might have to use close to 2 times the amount to match the oil content.

http://www.usahops.org/graphics/File/HGA%20BCI%20Reports/Variety%20Manual%207-24-12.pdf

3165
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« on: January 01, 2015, 10:33:48 AM »
As Denny pointed out, you will not get lager-like flavors by starting fermentation out warm. During the first 72 hours is when the yeast make most of the fermentation characteristics that will be the flavor of the beer. If your fermenting warm, you won't get the flavor characteristics you are looking for in a lager. It may not make a bad beer, but if your going to create ale-like esters in your lager, why not just stick with ale yeasts? That doesn't make much sense, now, does it?

For my lager schedule I start out at 48 before I pitch yeast. Aerate twice as long as ales (I prefer pure o2) pitch twice as much yeast, and let fermentation kick into high krausen at those cold temps. After about 72-96 hours you might decide to bump the temp up 2 degrees, and continue doing so every 24 hours until you get up to 56-58 degrees and let the fermentation slowly finish up. When signs of fermentation seriously start to slow down you could even let the temp raise to 60-62 to really let the beer finish cleaning itself up. Wait a few days around the 58-62 degree mark after fermentation has mostly stopped, then you can crash down to 32-34 degrees and lager for at least 1-2 weeks.

For low gravity lagers, you really only need a couple of weeks lagering time as long as you had a healthy fermentation, pitched at proper temps and got a good d-rest, etc.

Higher gravity you may want 4-6 weeks lagering.

This is close to what I do. Lagering at -1C is something I did for all of my lagers last year.

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