Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: 1 ... 209 210 [211] 212 213 ... 302
3151
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 easy steps to being a better brewer
« on: August 23, 2011, 08:11:29 PM »
Enjoy your beer - it is yours, and you can say I made this.


Now why would I tell someone you made my beer? :P
Forgot the quotes.

3152
Who resurected this old thing?

 Tubercle's take. No

 There is no such thing as secondary fermentation. It's all one fermentation and one fermentation only. Sometimes it is done in two seperate vessels in special circumstances but it is still only one;from begining to end. Secondary fermentation should be stricken from the vocabulary.

One of the NHC presentation in Minneapolis (I think) covered beer maturation by Steve Parks.  He had the fermentation laid out from the activity of the yeast, not the vessel.  Primary was consuming sugars as the energy source.  Secondary was when the sugars are gone and the yeast switch to acetaldehyde and diacetyl as the remaining energy source.  You can look that up in the NHC presentation archieves, going to bed now.

3153
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 easy steps to being a better brewer
« on: August 23, 2011, 06:56:04 PM »
Has anyone mentioned

Brew often.
Always try and improve the beer.
Enjoy your beer - it is yours, and you can say I made this.

3154
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Traveling and Sex in the Yeast World
« on: August 23, 2011, 05:56:58 PM »
So when did lager yeast come into use in Bavaria by the Monks?  Some say early 1400s, which predates Columbus.  So maybe the insect vector is the path, not wood from the New World.  Will we ever know?

3155
The Pub / Re: East coast earthquake
« on: August 23, 2011, 01:03:55 PM »
I was probably in the garage at that time, and didn't feel anyting happening.  Had to look up where it was - Virginia, about a 5.8 or so.

3156
All Grain Brewing / Re: So, how long to do a 5 gallon all-grain batch?
« on: August 23, 2011, 10:11:36 AM »
That way I could make a 10 gallon batch of beer that would be in Fred's OG range.   ;D   


Keeping up with the Bonjours, huh?  ;)

Of the several he belongs to, my club is one, so - yes.

Been thinking of a Thomas Hardy type beer for a while.  Might as well do a 10 gallon batch to see how it ages.

3157
All Grain Brewing / Re: So, how long to do a 5 gallon all-grain batch?
« on: August 23, 2011, 09:53:18 AM »
For Denny - I will do more batch sparges in the future.  I need to try the braid to get a better flow rate vs. the false bottom in the old round cooler I have.  My efficiencies have roughly been the same batch vs. fly.



Jeff, my experience is that if you have a good fly sparge system, your efficiency will be pretty much equal between the 2.  And just to be certain you understand, a fast runoff is an advantage, not a requirement, for batch sparging.  But my informal testing does seem to indicate that you can get clearer, more trouble free runoffs with a braid than a false bottom.

The reason I have been playing around with the barch sparging is to see if I can take time out of the brew day.  Advantage -yes.

On my pico system, I can get very clear runoffs.  That false bottom fits tight to the keg sides, so once you vorlauf and set the grain bed, it is very clear.   

One other reason I have been playing with the old round cooler, is that with the 2 mash tuns, I oculd have a combined 100 quarts of space.  That way I could make a 10 gallon batch of beer that would be in Fred's OG range.   ;D   

3158
All Grain Brewing / Re: Barley wine question
« on: August 23, 2011, 04:55:34 AM »
Use mrmalty.com to see how much slurry you need.  The slurry should be yeast, and not trub and yeast.  You can look up how to rinse the yeast.  Or you can just use the cake, this works, but a clean slurry is even better.

Barleywines do not have to take a year to be mature and ready to drink.  Here are some key items.  Propper amount of yeast (you know this already), give the yeast plenty of O2.  Control the fermentation temperature, as these can take off like a rocket and generate a high temperature and the fusel alcohols that go with it, and then you have to age for a year. This is the way I have made a pretty good Barleywine that was winning awards at 3 months.

Sierra Nevada makes Bigfoot after they are done with Celebration Ale brewing, which is made right after the hop harvest.  So the make Celebration in late Sept/Oct and then brew Bigfoot, which is released in January.  Not too long.

3159
The Pub / Re: Blot on the landscape
« on: August 23, 2011, 04:44:27 AM »
When I was a kid in the Midwest, windmills were everywhere in farm country.  Those were often the tallest thing on the farm, and the first thing you would often see as the car went down the road.  What is old is new again.  You can still get replacement parts.

I don't remember seeing one of these in years.  Many farmers went to electric motor pumps once they got electicity.

First hit from a Google seach.
http://www.windmills.net/

3160
All Grain Brewing / Re: So, how long to do a 5 gallon all-grain batch?
« on: August 22, 2011, 04:13:00 PM »
Hello, my name is Jeff and I mainly do fly sparges and 10 gallon batches.

My minimum time was 4.5 hours, but that did not include set up the night before , which is an hour.  The maximum time was 10.5 hoiurs for a Bo-Pils, and I had set up the night before.  Just saying that if you change process, you can lengthen the time (double decoction, long boil, chill to 40F all add to the time).

For 5 gallons I could knock off some time as it would take less to heat and cool.

For Denny - I will do more batch sparges in the future.  I need to try the braid to get a better flow rate vs. the false bottom in the old round cooler I have.  My efficiencies have roughly been the same batch vs. fly.


3161
All Grain Brewing / Re: Hops and malt.... a delicate balance
« on: August 22, 2011, 01:32:08 PM »
I think you need to back off on the gypsum.  My own water is 100ppm sulfate and I could never get a really good malty flavor even with a generous chloride addition to balance the sulfate.  I've since gone to RO water and keep my sulfate down to 50ppm and with 50-100ppm chloride I'm getting much better malt flavors.

What about having the sulfate levels stay where they are and increase the chloride levels? I've never messed with chloride levels, I usually just rely on the gypsum to adjust my calcium levels.

Lennie has a point here.  Matt Bryndelson of FW says they start with RO water and get the Ca up to about 100 ppm by adjusting the SO4 to 100 ppm with gypsum, and the Cl up to 100 ppm with CaCl2.  Use Brunwater to do this for your water, as best you can, and see if it helps.

On Michigan water - mine is at 364 ppm bicarbonate.  A friend in Kalamazoo says they run about 400 ppm.  Ever wonder why Bells has a bunch of porter and stout in the portfolio?   ;)

3162
All Grain Brewing / Re: Hops and malt.... a delicate balance
« on: August 22, 2011, 10:48:03 AM »
bittering level - In this particular bee, the IBUs were in the 50's so not overly high. And remember, this beer was the latest of many I have made where I have received these comments. I have received them on both very bitter beers, and what I would call, mildly bitter IPAs and Pale Ales.

Water profile - I have a high carbonate water so when I make and IPA I dilute 50/50 with RO water. My carbonates range in the 95-105ppm range during the seasons so I dilute down to <50ppm. I also add sulfate because my water ranges from 30-40ppm during the seasons. I add a few teaspoons of gypsum to the mash to try and bring the sulfate over 100ppm up to 150ppm. I have used the water spreadsheet provided by you Martin.

Malt - I have used many different types over the years. I find pils gives me the least amount of "maltiness" and I don't use it in IPAs meant for a competition just for that reason. I also use a lot of Canada Pale Ale malt and Breiss Pale Ale malt as my base malt for IPAs. I have also tweaked my recipes over the years to use less and less crystal malts. I usually end up with and IPA around 6-8 SRM now. I find I prefer this flavor profile better.

Thanks

You call that high?  Man, I wish I had that water!  Flint's water comes from Lake Huron IIRC.

WIth Bru'nwater, I have been within 0.1 pH most times, once was within 0.2.  Always good to check, though.

3163
Going Pro / Re: Brewery Financing for someone with no wealth/collateral
« on: August 22, 2011, 10:42:29 AM »
Keith - It was Beer Camp #13, the same one that Gordon Strong was at, and writes of in his book.  If you ever get a chance to go, drop everything and go.

That's great to hear!  I'm going in Nov.!

You are in for a treat Denny.  Say hello to Steve, Terence and Scott for me.  Good folks at beer camp.

3164
All Grain Brewing / Re: Hops and malt.... a delicate balance
« on: August 22, 2011, 09:59:58 AM »
My current house IPA is a Union Jack clone.  It uses 14% munich and about 1.5% carastan, and 5% cara pils.

You don't say what the base amlt is, so I assume NA 2-row.  If that is the case, try a different 2-row maltsters product.  Some of the best from the West use Rahr and/or Great Western as base malts.

Yeast selection can influence the malt/hop perception.  What do you use?  The Union Jack clone uses WLP-002/Wyeast 1968 as the yeast.

3165
Going Pro / Re: Brewery Financing for someone with no wealth/collateral
« on: August 22, 2011, 07:51:55 AM »
Thanks Jeff - I have been envious of your brewing on the Sierra Nevada pilot system. Was that beer camp?

<snip>

Brewery work is about as blue collar work as you can get. If you don't picture yourself as a laborer don't take up brewery work. It's not ditch digging, but it is hard work and long days.

Keith - It was Beer Camp #13, the same one that Gordon Strong was at, and writes of in his book.  If you ever get a chance to go, drop everything and go.

There is not much difference in Victorian era brewing technology in the smaller systems, and not much difference in the backbreaking labor involved.

Larger production breweries are automated to the point where the brewers weigh out the hops and dump them in.  Everything else is just about done (with some exceptions) from a computer terminal with a mouse click.  How else could a shift brewer knock out 200 barrels (or two 200 barrel batches on some systems) in 8 hours?

Pages: 1 ... 209 210 [211] 212 213 ... 302