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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3151
Hop Growing / Re: New and unusual rhizomes
« on: March 05, 2015, 01:38:34 PM »
You'd be surprised at how many lots of hops I've used over the last 25 years were seeded, some were actually loaded.  Homebrewers are pretty low on the feeding chain so I'm guessing we get the 'less than premium' hops when all is said and done.  All it takes is one boy in the hood.

The other surprise is how seeds are built, not just hops but most all are designed to weather harsh environments.  The first one popped up in the mid-90's and she's still going.

I don't think it has anything to do with sorting out who gets the best stuff, just whatever happened to get packaged together. I was in the hop storage room at Deschutes' production facility and we were rubbing the mosaics in our hands and they had seeds in them. Deschutes isn't exactly low on the food chain of craft brewers.

I do think that we get the table scraps. German hop farmers are said to be vigilant on keeping male plants out. Guess what? I had a pound of Hallertau Mittelfrueh that was full of seeds. I could hear the conversation "Defekt! Aus Amerika!"

3152
Ingredients / Re: Vitamin C in commercial beer
« on: March 05, 2015, 01:29:20 PM »
Belgium brewers also use coriander often, and that is another antioxidant.

3153
Homebrew Competitions / Re: Help me understand my score
« on: March 04, 2015, 11:56:41 PM »
And on the upside, if you got an overall 30 on a beer that was maybe in the wrong category and undercarbed, then it must have been otherwise pretty darn solid beer. Those two issues are easily fixable.

This is what I was going to say.

3154
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: When is a lager an ale
« on: March 03, 2015, 04:06:22 AM »
A lager style should be classified by one thing: brewed with lager yeast.
Unless the beer is in texas. If its over 5% and in texas, its an ale.

That law was changed a year or 2 ago.

3155
Awesome!  Beautiful looking beers.

I always chuckle at the "Big Circle" we homebrewers make.  We start out with the BMC swill, discover craft beer - usually pale ales, Irish Reds, or Wheats, then we discover hops & IPA, then somewhere in there are the Scottish ales, porters and stouts.  Then, we discover the Belgians!  Next is sours. Somewhere in here we're drinking anything and everything with a gravity over 1.070.  Doppelbock catches our attention.  Then, we start getting burnt out on the intensity of all the sour stuff and all the big beers.  So, it starts turning to the lagers - Schwarzbier, Marzen, and Vienna.  Eventually, we work our way back to Helles, Dortmunder, and Pils, which is kinda where we started, though nobody ever goes all the way back to the swill.

+1

I am now making some bitter and mild, those are tasting pretty good these days.

3156
The Pub / Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« on: March 02, 2015, 02:11:14 AM »

I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
I found this:
"The true origin of "pumpernickel" is nearly as strange, if somewhat less savory. "Pumpern" was a New High German word similar in meaning to the English "fart" (so chosen because, like the word "achoo," it imitated the sound it described), and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick" is a familiar name for Satan). Hence, pumpernickel is the "devil's fart," allegedly a reference to the bread's indigestible qualities and hence the effect it produced on those who consumed it."


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

St. Nicholas is the bringer of gifts, and gifts are exchanged on Dec. 6th in Germany. Not a devil by any means. Now the Krampus is another thing all together, on Dec. 5th.

Most references to Old Nick that I can find say it is old English for the devil. How it got to Germany is something I don't know.
Old English and German are quite close. It was probably the other way around in that the folklore probably moved from Northern Europe to England (think Beowolf). Modern German is related very closely to old English, both Anglo-saxon in origen. Modern English is mostly Anglo Saxon with a strong french influence starting in 1066. If you read an old english version of something familiar, like The Lord's Prayer, it sounds a bit German. If you read Middle English like Chaucer (1300's), it sounds a bit French ("whan that Aprille with his shoure's  sote...) , then once you get to Shakespeare (1600) it sounds, well English.

Modern English is a Germanic language that has little resblance to German.

3157
The Pub / Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« on: March 02, 2015, 12:23:49 AM »

I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
I found this:
"The true origin of "pumpernickel" is nearly as strange, if somewhat less savory. "Pumpern" was a New High German word similar in meaning to the English "fart" (so chosen because, like the word "achoo," it imitated the sound it described), and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick" is a familiar name for Satan). Hence, pumpernickel is the "devil's fart," allegedly a reference to the bread's indigestible qualities and hence the effect it produced on those who consumed it."


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

St. Nicholas is the bringer of gifts, and gifts are exchanged on Dec. 6th in Germany. Not a devil by any means. Now the Krampus is another thing all together, on Dec. 5th.

Most references to Old Nick that I can find say it is old English for the devil. How it got to Germany is something I don't know.

3158
The Pub / Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« on: March 01, 2015, 11:24:01 PM »
I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.

3159
Pimp My System / Re: Redbird Brewhouse - There's Always a Project
« on: March 01, 2015, 11:15:42 PM »
I don't have a spiffy neon, but there is a big PU mirror in the basement.

3160
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast starter? Psshhhhhh.... Whatever ;)
« on: March 01, 2015, 11:13:03 PM »



Science...fluoride in the water supply prevents cavities and is harmless...Really?

Worked for me and a lot of other people I know.
You better be careful Denny.  Fluoridation may be a communist plot to control our minds.
It's your money they are after...your mind may already be controlled...

My mind is already controlled by C2H6O and my mash tun.

Do NOT ride the bomb.   ;)

Paul
Sterling Hayden and Slim Pickens are in my mind for some reason.

3161
She is an Australian, and beer -any beer- is very expensive there. Maybe she just wants a buzz?

3162
Beer Travel / Re: Newport Hofbrauhaus
« on: March 01, 2015, 01:39:40 AM »
German look and feel, but you aren't in Munich.

3163
Beer Recipes / Re: first helles help
« on: February 28, 2015, 08:30:59 PM »
There is a hint of hop aroma in some, a little hop flavor in most, and the bitterness is to balance the malt in the finish.

Once at Augustiner Keller, the balance in the finish was perfect. I need to go back for recalibration.

3164
Beer Recipes / Re: first helles help
« on: February 28, 2015, 02:49:08 PM »
Grits is OK. Mash high pH to help maltyness. Weigh hops accurately, by grams if you can, a small error in weight can give an error in IBUs. Noble hops, HMF is good. Look at Martin's Munich Water article in Zymurgy for a good water profile.
I was on my phone yesterday, and now want to explain a little more on the weight part.

The first couple of Helles we brewed were knocked for being too bitter. The amount of IBUs targeted was only 20, and when I tasted it, yeah the Master level judge was right the bitterness was too high. Even for a 10 gallon batch it seems you are just waving some hops over the kettle for a Helles! Recently I realized Mrs. R would weigh hops on the same scale we weigh grains on, and that there must be some sticktion at low weights that cause it to weigh a little low at 1 oz. It is fine with a 100 gram test weight, but a Hopunion 1 oz package only weighed about 22 grams on that scale, but weighed 28.5 grams on the small gram scale used for water salt additions. An "ounce" on the bigger scale would result in too large a bittering charge. The Helles that is carbing up right now will show me if I have found the root cause to my bitter Helles issue.


Hmmmmm .... I was hoping you were back to explain the addition of "grits"....

Damn phone! GRIST!

Good one Keith!

At least I can't blame that on cold fingers, it was 66F yesterday.

3165
Beer Recipes / Re: first helles help
« on: February 28, 2015, 02:37:45 PM »
Grits is OK. Mash high pH to help maltyness. Weigh hops accurately, by grams if you can, a small error in weight can give an error in IBUs. Noble hops, HMF is good. Look at Martin's Munich Water article in Zymurgy for a good water profile.
I was on my phone yesterday, and now want to explain a little more on the weight part.

The first couple of Helles we brewed were knocked for being too bitter. The amount of IBUs targeted was only 20, and when I tasted it, yeah the Master level judge was right the bitterness was too high. Even for a 10 gallon batch it seems you are just waving some hops over the kettle for a Helles! Recently I realized Mrs. R would weigh hops on the same scale we weigh grains on, and that there must be some sticktion at low weights that cause it to weigh a little low at 1 oz. It is fine with a 100 gram test weight, but a Hopunion 1 oz package only weighed about 22 grams on that scale, but weighed 28.5 grams on the small gram scale used for water salt additions. An "ounce" on the bigger scale would result in too large a bittering charge. The Helles that is carbing up right now will show me if I have found the root cause to my bitter Helles issue.

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