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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3166
Thanks for the tip.  I'll do it and send you an update in a couple of months when I taste the first bottle.
To be clear, do the mini-mash on just the Munich malt. You can steep the other specialty grains separately. if you do them all together the Munich's enzymes will be too diluted.

3167
One thing to note is that most Ribes varieties are susceptible to white pine blister rust, so they are restricted or banned in many areas. Even if you are able to find an online supplier that will ship them to you (hint, hint ;) ), use good judgement whether it would it would be the best idea for your local flora to introduce Ribes plants.
Most Ribes were wiped out in the 40's-50's by Departments of Agriculture who wanted to protect white pines from the rust, but regulations in many states are relaxing lately. White pine blister rust kills white pines, but requires nearby Ribes plants to complete it's life cycle. Therefore - no Ribes = no rust.

A few details that can help us be responsible Ribes owners.

Black and golden currants are the worst carriers, so if you can go with another currant or gooseberries, that's good. Black and golden currants are banned in Delaware while other Ribes sp. are allowed. The ban was recently revised according to recommendations from University of Delaware pathologists.

There are rust-resistant varieties of Ribes, but they are only resistant to SYMPTOMS. They can still carry the disease and transfer it to nearby white pines.

The disease does require some proximity to pines to transfer. So if you plant Ribes, plant them >500ft from white pines if you can manage it. If you have a grove of white pines on your property that you love and you can't plant far away - maybe you should just plant some blueberries or another small fruit.

Thanks for that information. I know black currants are considered invasive in MI, but some fruit farms are grandfathered to grow them. New planting are prohibited. MI was logged for the white pines in the 1800s. Hardwoods were left, but then logged off for furniture and car bodies (Ford Woody). There are still some white pine in the state, and the an old growth stand is a state park.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hartwick_Pines_State_Park

3168
nice write up. Currants are common in Vermont where I grew up. I never really got into them though. Isn't kirsh black currant?
Do you mean Kirsch? That is German for cherry. There is a brandy called Kirsch, and Google says that is distilled from sour cherries.

3169
Beer Travel / Re: Albuquerque & Santa Fe
« on: July 25, 2014, 04:30:34 AM »
La Cumbre had some outstanding beers. Il Vicino has pretty good beer and really good pizza.

3170
I'm trying to make something similar to an Oktoberfest lager, but don't have the capability of fermenting at lager temperatures.  So I'm trying to put together an ale with a grain bill that's similar and see how it turns out.

I also don't like too much hops in my brew.
 
When you say don't bother with the Munich grain, steeping it in a grain bag for a while won't accomplish anything?

What other changes would you recommend?
Munich will convert itself, it does not have excess enzymes, so "steep" it in 1.5 qt. water/lb grain at about 155-158F for 45 min. to an hour. You will have converted the starches then. Oh, and you then can say you did a mini-mash, a step towards all grain brewing. Have fun.

3171
Ingredients / Re: Preparing Hops
« on: July 25, 2014, 04:21:31 AM »
The logic on myrcene seems plausible. It is pretty volatile, heck, it is hard to get into your beer.

3172
Ingredients / Re: Preparing Hops
« on: July 24, 2014, 08:40:22 PM »
if you toast your own oats or malt it's often recommended to let them off gas for a few days before brewing with them.
Malt also needs to condition for about a month after it has been kilned. That was from Dr. Bamforth at the NHC in SD, and he said no one knows why it is so. There is a small passage on it in Brewing by Lewis.

The one on hops is still new to me.

I do know brewers that stage the hops (weigh out and put in the brew house) for the next days brew, but that is timing and logistics.

3173
Ingredients / Re: Preparing Hops
« on: July 24, 2014, 07:41:18 PM »
I have never heard that.

What podcast? Some are more credible than others.

3174
Going Pro / Re: Yellowhammer Article
« on: July 24, 2014, 07:36:49 PM »

Nice looking beer garden. Got to get down there sometime.
Thought you come to visit me first :)

We need to all get together, rent a big-ass van. Start with Schmidlin's place in WA, his Sean's pub in CO, Ron's in whats-it (Jersery?) then head south to YH. Who am I forgetting? Oh, Thirtsy Monk's in WI. Maybe stop by and pick up Denny in OR.
We will need a big bus. That would be a trip one could write a book about.  ;)

I do have a lot of breweries to visit!

3175
Beer Travel / Re: Cologne and Dusseldorf trip in the works
« on: July 24, 2014, 12:56:53 PM »
You can walk to Uerige, Im Fuschen, Zum Schuessel breweries and the Schneider tap house in the Altstadt in Duesseldorf. Have one at each (.25 liter), then go back to your favorite for more.

Great suggestion - I took a walking beer tour in the Alstadt that did this and it was a lot of fun.
There is also a new Alt brewery there, Kuerzer, so I might have to go back someday.

I visited that one on my tour.  IIRC it has fermenters that are on the second level and only the very bottom of the cone sticks down through the concrete ceiling.  That was the first time I'd seen anything like that.
It is common in big breweries, usually 800 bbl fermenters, which are outside, but the bottoms are in the cellar.

3176
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Barleywine Yeast Suggestions
« on: July 24, 2014, 12:21:05 PM »
Mine went to the kegs a little bit a go. I had split the batch.
Wyeast 1028 1.115 OG 1.028 FG  11.4% ABV 74% Attenuation
WLP 022 1.115 OG 1.024 FG 11.9% ABV 77% Attenuation

Samples tasted pretty nice. I will see how they mature, and can always blend.

Gordon's beer was 1.123 OG and 1.034 FG. He used 1028.


3177
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Barleywine Yeast Suggestions
« on: July 24, 2014, 10:33:00 AM »
The Barleywine I did was all British Pale ale malts, no crystal. I had MO, Pearl, and Golden Promise to use up!

3178
You said you did not add anything to the kettle. Kettle finings like Irish moss are to help give a clear beer by pulling the hot break out. I think you illustrated why kettle finings are used.

3179
Going Pro / Re: Yellowhammer Article
« on: July 24, 2014, 09:04:31 AM »
Nice looking beer garden. Got to get down there sometime.

3180
Beer Travel / Re: Cologne and Dusseldorf trip in the works
« on: July 24, 2014, 08:52:10 AM »
You can walk to Uerige, Im Fuschen, Zum Schuessel breweries and the Schneider tap house in the Altstadt in Duesseldorf. Have one at each (.25 liter), then go back to your favorite for more.

Great suggestion - I took a walking beer tour in the Alstadt that did this and it was a lot of fun.
There is also a new Alt brewery there, Kuerzer, so I might have to go back someday.

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