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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3212
The WL Essex is one that I really like. Ester profile is fruity, it drops bright with a little time, and is a top cropped if you harvest that way.

Never used it for a stout, though.

3213
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Homebrew Suppliers
« on: November 03, 2014, 03:52:57 PM »
AiH is my LHBS, so they get my vote.

3214
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smoke Malt % in a IIPA
« on: November 03, 2014, 09:31:44 AM »
A friend in the club made a pretty tasty smoked American Barleywine. Easy on the smoke is the key.

3215
All Grain Brewing / Re: carmel taste to wee heavy
« on: November 03, 2014, 06:49:38 AM »
I'd have to have some Timothy Taylor Landlord on site, too. Jeff, I assume you did ?

You can find it often in London, I haven't been to the Yorkshires. Great pint of bitter.

3216
All Grain Brewing / Re: carmel taste to wee heavy
« on: November 03, 2014, 06:11:07 AM »
Yeah, Fuller's can be all over the place in terms of that. Sometimes I'll pick up a cold bottle or two that's excellent, other times it's ok at best. Obviously it's all in the age. Someday I'm hoping to get over there and get some at the source (along with Fuller's Pride as well) !
Drink some Chiswick Bitter, don't miss that one. It doesn't travel well at all.

3217
All Grain Brewing / Re: carmel taste to wee heavy
« on: November 03, 2014, 05:59:46 AM »
You guys should explain what kind of oxidation. Most will be thinking that causes cardboard wet paper, not carmel...

This blog references a study by Charlie Bamforth on how bottled beer changes with aging.  Developing strong caramel flavor over time is one of those changes according to him. I noticed it back when I used to buy a lot of dusty imports.

http://beersensoryscience.wordpress.com/2010/11/15/chemistry-of-beer-aging/
That explains why the Fullers ESB you buy here tastes nothing like the cask beer they serve in London.
The oxidation is not kind to the ESB's flavors. Bottled ESB also is a higher OG/ABV, as it has more of the first runnings in the parti gyle, see the Ron Pattinson article in the latest Zymurgy.

3218
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smoke Malt % in a IIPA
« on: November 03, 2014, 05:54:14 AM »
Smoke and hops usually don't go well together. If you really want to do this, then I would say don't use much rauchmalt and use spicy hops. The reason for the spicy hops is that smoke is a phenolic, as are most spicy flavors. A Grodziskie made with smoked wheat malt and lots of spicy Saaz hops worked for me. You might try Sterling, and American hop with Saaz character and higher AA and oils.

Hop flavor and aroma fade quickly, are you aging to get rid of those flavors that make an IIPA? Rauchbier is fine for a good while, but is not know for aging.

3219
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast starter time question
« on: November 02, 2014, 12:02:38 PM »
Yes Arcadia uses Ringwood. One of the Brewers said it was a "Fussy b****" in that it would require more attention some times, ie rousing.

Grizzly Peak in Ann Arbor had a Pugsley system and would struggle with Diacetyl. They changed to Essex and the beers are much improved. They open ferment and top crop. The problem is they don't have the tank time for a long D rest, they were doing close to 1600 barrels on a 7 barrel system. WLP -022 produces clean beer for them.

Real Ringwood is a Yorkshire square multi-strain yeast culture that requires rousing and aeration during fermentation, or it will tend to produce a diacetyl bomb.  While the culture is named after the microbrewery Peter Austin built after he retired from the Hull Brewery, Ringwood originally came from Webster's Brewery (a.k.a. the Fountain Head Brewery) in Halifax, West Riding, Yorkshire.   

If one examines a Peter Austin designed/Alan Pugsley installed brewery closely, one finds a device that I like to refer to as a Yorkshire shower head.  This device is used to rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation (yes, I said rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation), as can be seen at time 0:12 in this video shot at the Blacksheep Brewery in North Yorkshire: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJmLNj14C_w.   It can also be seen in the following video, which was shot a Peter Austin designed /Alan Pugsley built brew pub in Baltimore, Maryland: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGIThQ7w0ls (the device is also used to aerate wort).
Arcadia has the Pugsley system, I don't know if it is still in Battle Creek or at the new production brewery in Kalamazoo. The next time I see the brewer I will ask her more specifics on her feelings about Ringwood.

She said the pumps had to be turned on (not sure she said when), as the years drops in 3 days if done or not.

The best time for them to top crop was at 1.022. They thought they would have the timing figured out, but sometimes it would be much earlier, which had some stories associated.

After fermentation, she said the beer had to be kept away from O2 to the point that they would purge the tanks and transfer lines. Just a little air would create diacetyl from the leftover precursors.

There was a much that had to be done to make beer with low diacetyl, according to her. 

3220
Ingredients / Re: Is Wet Hopping BS?
« on: November 01, 2014, 05:39:27 PM »
Founders Harvest is grassy this year, but Mrs. R. liked it.

Arcadia Cannonball Gold was not grassy and we both liked it. Had it at the production brewery in Kalamazoo, and we tasted 3 versions, with wet hops from 3 small farms. The one from Hop Head Farms in Hickory Corners near Kalamazoo was the one we liked best.

Jeff, have you tried the wet hopped ale from 51 North Brewery in Lake Orion? I thought it was very good; not grassy at all.
I am sorry to say we have not been there . It is on our radar, but it is one of those you can't get there fr on here places. An hour for 29 miles is a deterrent
.

3221
Ingredients / Re: Is Wet Hopping BS?
« on: October 31, 2014, 08:20:49 AM »
Founders Harvest is grassy this year, but Mrs. R. liked it.

Arcadia Cannonball Gold was not grassy and we both liked it. Had it at the production brewery in Kalamazoo, and we tasted 3 versions, with wet hops from 3 small farms. The one from Hop Head Farms in Hickory Corners near Kalamazoo was the one we liked best.

3222
Equipment and Software / Re: Wort grant?
« on: October 31, 2014, 07:32:42 AM »
I have a 5 gallon kettle that I sometimes use as a grant if the grain bill will be sticky. It helps.


3223
The Pub / Re: Postdoc Brewing
« on: October 31, 2014, 07:26:21 AM »
That will a stop on our next PNW trip.

3224
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Yeast Affects Beer
« on: October 30, 2014, 01:07:29 PM »
Many breweries use the Chico strain. I am not sure that one would think that SN , Russian River,  and Founders all taste alike.

SN uses the same 2.row and C60 as the base for most of their ales. The water would be treated the same. Their beers have a house flavor, but it is the sum of yeast, ingredients, and process being similar.
I was primarily referring to yeast strains that impart flavor :)

I was replying to Jim, who brought up SN.

No argument that certain British strains are distinctive and impart a house flavor. Some Belgian strains immediately bring the brewery to mind, WY-3787 and I go Mmmm Westmalle!

Without question "house character" is more that merely yeast.  But it is a major player. SN Ovila Quad comes to mind. I would not know that was a SN beer but for the label.
There was a nice presentation at the 2011 NHC on the development of that Ovila line of beers.

3225
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: October 30, 2014, 06:14:45 AM »
this is why i installed an RO system.

my well water:

pH                                            8.0
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 283
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.47
Cations / Anions, me/L 5.3 / 5.4
ppm
Sodium, Na           114
Potassium, K          2
Calcium, Ca            4
Magnesium, Mg       1
Total Hardness, CaCO3 14
Nitrate, NO3-N          0.1 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S          3
Chloride, Cl              3
Carbonate,CO3         6
Bicarbonate, HCO3      297
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3   253

High sodium, high bicarbonate. Does the city soften the water? Or maybe there is a baking soda mine in town?

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