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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3256
Ingredients / Re: Crisp Maris Otter
« on: December 09, 2014, 05:22:10 PM »
Anyone know a site where I can plug this batch number in to get any available specifics?


Sent from Franx Brew Works using Tapatalk

if the sack says glen eagles, it is indeed floor malted MO. glen eagles is the trade name for floor malted, vs. crsip made in silos.

Crisp owns Gleneagles, it is in Scotland, and does floor maltings. Also pretty dark stuff at 5.2L.
http://www.certifiedfoods.com/glen.htm

Crisp is floor malted or done in Salidin boxes, not silos. BSG says they floor malt the MO. It might come down to which plant. 4.2L
http://www.certifiedfoods.com/maris.htm

www.crispmalt.co has plenty of pictures of floor maltings. One might have to contact them to find out for sure.

interesting. this is what ive understood- perhaps its not accurate vs what you describe:

Crisp's Gleneagle® Maris Otter Malt is an heirloom varietal that is World renowned for its deep, rich flavor.  It is considered Heirloom because it is an old variety with a very low yield of 1.5-2 tons per acre.  Modern varietals now produce up to 4 tons per acre.  Why do farmers grow Maris Otter when new high-yield, disease resistant varietals are available? Because Craft Brewers around the World are willing to pay a premium for the complex, authentic pub flavor that Maris Otter provides.

Please note this is the distinguished Glen Eagles version of Crips Maris Otter. Crips produces two types of the Maris Otter malt. A regular version malted in modern silos and this exclusive Glen Eagles version of their Maris Otter that is floor malted by hand in the traditional way. This malt is obviously great for all English style Ales but is perfectly suited for any beer where you want a rich, bready malt flavor.

edit: i believe that the branding may be the point of confusion. from what i understand, when labeled Crisp or Crisp Finest, its not the floor malter variety and is lower lovi. when Labeled Crisp GlenEagles, its the floor malted version and indeed is 5+ lovi.
All Gleneagles is floor malted, some Crisp is floor malted as they still have a floor maltings. What we get is not so clear. The Finest is not floor malted, but I don't remember a sack saying that.

Maybe Mallett's book will say something about the floor malted producers.

3257
Ingredients / Re: Crisp Maris Otter
« on: December 09, 2014, 04:54:21 PM »
Anyone know a site where I can plug this batch number in to get any available specifics?


Sent from Franx Brew Works using Tapatalk

if the sack says glen eagles, it is indeed floor malted MO. glen eagles is the trade name for floor malted, vs. crsip made in silos.

Crisp owns Gleneagles, it is in Scotland, and does floor maltings. Also pretty dark stuff at 5.2L.
http://www.certifiedfoods.com/glen.htm

Crisp is floor malted or done in Salidin boxes, not silos. BSG says they floor malt the MO. It might come down to which plant. 4.2L
http://www.certifiedfoods.com/maris.htm

www.crispmalt.co has plenty of pictures of floor maltings. One might have to contact them to find out for sure.

3258
Ingredients / Re: Crisp Maris Otter
« on: December 09, 2014, 02:27:19 PM »
I thought Crisp MO is floor malted. I really like Crisp.

Glenneagles is a small maltings owned by Crisp in Scotland(?). The MO from there is said to be very flavorful. You scored Frank.

3259
Homebrew Competitions / Re: NHC 15
« on: December 09, 2014, 09:44:44 AM »
My $.02 is that all the beers your's are judged against are just as old.

I think it is ultimately a logistics issue for the organizers but the product of the rule is certainly a level playing field for beer age. It may not be in every beer's best interests but it's more fair than letting people game their proximity or mailing options to get a fresher beer into the judges' hands. It is a rule that cuts against people who would brew a hop-forward beer in styles where there can be a range of hop character (like saison) but knowing the rules well in advance allows the brewer to decide whether he or she wants to risk sending that beer to the competition.

Agreed. It is a brewing competition, packaging is part of the brewing process. One should learn to package with low O2 to preserve the beer. That goes for all beers, as O2 will stale any beer, and decrease hop aroma in those hoppy styles.

3260
Homebrew Competitions / Re: NHC 15
« on: December 08, 2014, 08:54:25 PM »
Still, those 4/10 regions are going to have to store entries for 5 weeks or so before they ever judge them.   :-\

cheers--
--Michael

What is the rationale behind requiring all entries to arrive at the same time, regardless of when they are going to be judged?  That makes very little sense to me, but I could be missing something.  Why couldn't each regional accept entries by a date most reasonable for them.  Bottling a beer 6 weeks before it is going to be judged is not at all in the best interest of the beer.  Plus, I would think the regionals would rather not have to find a place to store them for that long either.  Seems a simple fix would be to simply have a "beer must arrive by" date that is 2-3 weeks before each regional competition - just like every other competition all year long.

My $.02 is that all the beers your's are judged against are just as old.

3261
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Used kegs
« on: December 08, 2014, 08:51:38 PM »

The AiN new kegs are made in China. They worked with the manufacturer to get them to a high quality point , and I must say the kegs look fantastic in the store. The top and bottom rubber parts look superb. The welds are as good as in the Old US made ones. The SS meets 304 specs from a test sheet they had a local lab do (saw the results somewhere).

If I decide to buy some more kegs, I will go new. Must. Resist. Urge. To Buy.
I just saw that his prices went up. I was about to dump some used kegs and jump on two small and two big, but the price increase means I will need to wait a while.
Watch for sales.

3262
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Used kegs
« on: December 07, 2014, 02:24:36 PM »
The AiN new kegs are made in China. They worked with the manufacturer to get them to a high quality point , and I must say the kegs look fantastic in the store. The top and bottom rubber parts look superb. The welds are as good as in the Old US made ones. The SS meets 304 specs from a test sheet they had a local lab do (saw the results somewhere).

If I decide to buy some more kegs, I will go new. Must. Resist. Urge. To Buy.

3263
Beer Recipes / Re: Devil's Backbone Vienna Lager
« on: December 07, 2014, 11:08:06 AM »
my Batch size would be 5 gallon  All Grain, and 72% efficiency.  would my local Homebrew USA have most of the grains?  and which yeast should i use with it.

Regards

Dave

Which yeast? They say Augustiner, which is said to be WLP-860 which is a seasonal strain. It may be out soon.

3264
Beer Recipes / Re: AIPA, IRA and RIS
« on: December 07, 2014, 11:06:50 AM »
Heed these words of wisdom: Be ware of recipes you find on the internet!

Good advice Keith, you are smart and handsome!

3265
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lager yeast starter at 50 degrees
« on: December 07, 2014, 10:32:27 AM »
WLP-830 for German Pilsners.

WLP-833 for malty lagers.

3266
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: diacetyl rest
« on: December 07, 2014, 09:17:24 AM »
Just curious - how do you perceive it to be?  I have heard from others that it is buttery tasting, or slick in the mouthfeel or even perceived as a bit of soap in the nose...is there a commercial example where it is prevalent to be able to know what I should be tasting or feeling?  I honestly think that I may be "blind" to it and wonder if there is a way to overcome the blind spot.  I am starting a BJCP class next week so I hope that I can make it through the various faults with enough sense to actually evaluate the beers to be judged.

I can taste diacetyl in most Sam Smiths beers. When judging I rely on the slick mouthfeel.

Some people are blind to it, I have a high threshold compared to many in the club. If you are blind to it, beyond the slick feel, not much you can do as it is like being color blind.

For some of my beers, I ask Mrs. R to taste for diacetyl as she is more sensitive to it.

3267
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with English yeasts not fully attenuating
« on: December 07, 2014, 09:13:28 AM »
On calibrating my thermometer, it's been calibrated in an ice water bath at 32.0f. But it reads 208.6 in boiling water at 2000'. Boiling water should be 210f at my altitude, right? This is the thermometer I use: http://www.thermoworks.com/products/low_cost/rt616.html. I'm not sure 1.4 degrees would make that much difference in fermentability. I'll try a longer mash time if it can improve fermentability but according to Braukaiser's chart, I am achieving damn near 100% conversion efficiency.

On limiting crystal malts, I've had the same results with a SMASH beer.

As far as using simple sugar, it's not off the table but but I would prefer to earn my English ale merit badge without it. If others can achieve satisfactory results without it, I should be able to as well.

Thanks again.
208.1F at 2000 Ft.

Really? I always thought the formula was 212@ sea level, minus one degree for every 1000'.

212 at Sea Level and standard pressure. Atm pressure will have be a smaller adjustment than altitude.
Pressure vs altitude.
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/boiling-points-water-altitude-d_1344.html

Presure and altitude can be input on this calculator.
http://www.csgnetwork.com/h2oboilcalc.html




3268
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with English yeasts not fully attenuating
« on: December 07, 2014, 08:03:56 AM »
On calibrating my thermometer, it's been calibrated in an ice water bath at 32.0f. But it reads 208.6 in boiling water at 2000'. Boiling water should be 210f at my altitude, right? This is the thermometer I use: http://www.thermoworks.com/products/low_cost/rt616.html. I'm not sure 1.4 degrees would make that much difference in fermentability. I'll try a longer mash time if it can improve fermentability but according to Braukaiser's chart, I am achieving damn near 100% conversion efficiency.

On limiting crystal malts, I've had the same results with a SMASH beer.

As far as using simple sugar, it's not off the table but but I would prefer to earn my English ale merit badge without it. If others can achieve satisfactory results without it, I should be able to as well.

Thanks again.
208.1F at 2000 Ft.

3269
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: diacetyl rest
« on: December 07, 2014, 05:46:13 AM »
I like to start raising the temps slowly just as the krausen starts dropping back into the beer.  That lets me know that the fermentation is slowing down and the yeast could probably benefit from a few degrees temp increase.  I always do a diacetyl rest regardless if I need one or not (I don't check to see if I need one first).  I figure either way warming up the beer and yeast towards the end of fermentation does not harm and can actually do some good (i.e. speed up diacetyl intake and increase attenuation).

The increased yeast activity in the D-rest also will scrub out sulfur, which is something of a benefit.

3270
Equipment and Software / Re: Bucket heater for stovetop brewing
« on: December 07, 2014, 05:39:16 AM »
Jeff, no sign of scorching at all. I pulled the stick out of the wort and put it right into a pitcher of warm water to rinse it off. There was a small bit of hop residue at the top that wiped off easily. If it got pretty gross I'd probably give it a PBW soak. Its only 1000 watts. I could see a bigger element potentially being a higher risk for scorching.

Jimmy, it goes in a normal 120V outlet. I just plug it into the GFI outlet next to my stove top. If you can manage it, you could always use a second heater to double your output. At under 40 bucks apiece it's a manageable investment.

You would want to have the second heater on another circuit if 15 amps, and it would be pushing it on a 20 amp circuit.

Thanks for the feedback on the element in the wort, Eric. I might have to try that with that to speed up getting to a boil.

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