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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3286
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Question regarding water
« on: November 18, 2014, 11:57:54 AM »
There are pull down water profiles in Brun'water that can give you an idea of what to do. You will want Amber Ballanced or Amber Malty for most lagers that I can think of off the top of my head. Look on tab 3, cell 5a.

I did a BoPils with just some CaCl2 to get to 35 ppm, and the beer tasted minerally. Martin has written about the importance of having some other flavor ions, such as Na, SO4 and even Mg to give the correct flavor profile.

As far as sulfates, it will give more of a sharp dry bitterness, which you don't want in a BoPils, but is an essential characteristic for a German Pils. I always add gypsum to get the SO4 up in my German Pils. The example above for the BoPils was to keep the SO4 out, but I should have gone with the Pilsen water profile.

3287
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: PSA - New Yeast Company
« on: November 18, 2014, 06:26:52 AM »
So , if it's 200 billion cells for $13... how is this different than buying two packs of Wyeast?
+1

3288
Other Fermentables / Re: S-05 in a Mead?
« on: November 17, 2014, 08:19:47 PM »
The club's mead project, same must different yeast, had US-05 as one of the yeasts. IIRC it went to about 15% with staggered nutrient additions, and the CO2 knocked out a couple times a day.

3289
The Pub / Re: What's the Weather Like Where You Are?
« on: November 17, 2014, 09:38:38 AM »
80F yesterday, a little colder today, and it will be much colder tonight when I get home.

3290
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 1469...Sulphur??
« on: November 17, 2014, 09:36:08 AM »
I f a lager fermentation smells sulfury, I'm not concerned as the sulfur has left the beer.

3291
Wood/Casks / Re: Barrel Aged beer tastes like charcoal
« on: November 17, 2014, 09:30:19 AM »
Some barrels are toasted (wine, brandy), some are charred (bourbon). You can have light or heavy toast or char.

I have a couple of cognac barrels that were bought new. For Belgian sours I put them through a rinse cycle.with soda wash to strip the toast and oak character out - not really desireable at high levels in the target beers.

You have removed some of the char flavor with the first beer. You could do a wash if you wish, or fill with water, soak,  and taste to see if there is too much.

3292
Equipment and Software / Re: Grain Mill
« on: November 16, 2014, 11:49:22 AM »
Use a square of some sorts when mounting your mm3. Will save you a bunch of headaches. After seeing all the carpentry work you have done, I'm sure you can handle it.

That is how I did it. Only used it once so far.

3293
Ingredients / Re: Homemade Flaked Rye
« on: November 15, 2014, 08:18:03 AM »
Thanks for the update. Another tweek to try someday.

3294
The higher pressure in big conicals results in lower ester formation. Just because a brewery runs their fermentation at X temp in a 400 or 800 bbl conical does not mean one should try that at home.

3295
Beer Recipes / Re: Celebrator
« on: November 13, 2014, 01:11:38 PM »
I would recemend WLP 833 which most authorities say came from Ayinger. It makes a really nice malty lager.

3296
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 13, 2014, 08:07:11 AM »
The difference between wild and domesticated yeast. By the way I like the idea of someone domesticating yeast...

Anyway, in homebrew terms I think wild means yeast from the surroundings (AKA cool ship) they kind of intentionally allowed in, where as unintentional would be called infection, or more precisely contamination.  Domesticated I suppose would indicate a strain that was cultured and pitched on purpose. Any yeast could be any of the 3. Think of brett. If you open ferment and some gets in, thats wild. If you close ferment and some gets in thats an infection. If you go to a LHBS and buy some brett to pitch, thats domesticated. Back to the discussion at hand, I doubt the sanitizer knows if its wild, contamination, or domesticated.
So wolves, bears, and large cats bred for generations on zoos are domesticated?

This might be an undomesticated rabbit trail, but I would say yes they are, to a degree. I wouldn't call them wild, or a contamination,  so that leaves domesticated. But thats just an opinion. Its been a long time since I've done much zooing

Just don't get in the enclosure next time at the zoo.

3297
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 13, 2014, 08:05:04 AM »
The difference between wild and domesticated yeast. By the way I like the idea of someone domesticating yeast...

Anyway, in homebrew terms I think wild means yeast from the surroundings (AKA cool ship) they kind of intentionally allowed in, where as unintentional would be called infection, or more precisely contamination.  Domesticated I suppose would indicate a strain that was cultured and pitched on purpose. Any yeast could be any of the 3. Think of brett. If you open ferment and some gets in, thats wild. If you close ferment and some gets in thats an infection. If you go to a LHBS and buy some brett to pitch, thats domesticated. Back to the discussion at hand, I doubt the sanitizer knows if its wild, contamination, or domesticated.
So wolves, bears, and large cats bred for generations on zoos are domesticated?

This might be an undomesticated rabbit trail, but I would say yes they are, to a degree. I wouldn't call them wild, or a contamination,  so that leaves domesticated. But thats just an opinion. Its been a long time since I've done much zooing

Just don't get in the enclosure next time at the zoo.

3298
The Pub / Re: What to read
« on: November 13, 2014, 07:56:50 AM »
I would also add anything by Graham Greene and anything by Cormac McCarthy.  Blood Meridian is phenomenal.  The Road bothered me for ages.  Still does.  All The Pretty Horses is great, despite the movie. 

Avoid D.H. Lawrence.  I labored for most of the summer with The Plumed Serpent.  I gave up.  Not a proud moment, but I only have so much time.
Cormac McCarthy writes books that haunt me too, but are so rewarding to read. I only got have way through the last border trilogy book because as the wife says, "ain't going to have a happy ending".

I also read all of Edward Abbey's stuff when I was knocking around the Canyons and lousy stinking desert in the 90s.

If anyone is into the Southwest, Craig Childs has some excellent books.

Blood Meridian is tough going. The violence in that book is mind boggling. I really enjoyed Sutree. I would also add anything by Flannery O'Connor is great. I reread most of Hemingway's short stories over the summer...still great. It is odd to me that Hemingway is now an underrated writer. I do enjoy reading Edward Abbey, although I haven't read too much of it. I'll have to check out Craig Childs.

"House of Rain" by Childs is a covers the Anasazi and where they probably went. I really enjoyed that as we had been to many sites. We also stopped at the Chimney Rock site in CO which was probably built to observe the lunar stand still.

Charles Bowden is another Southwestern author I enjoy. Similar to Abbey, but a little darker and very moody.


3299
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 12, 2014, 08:56:47 PM »
The difference between wild and domesticated yeast. By the way I like the idea of someone domesticating yeast...

Anyway, in homebrew terms I think wild means yeast from the surroundings (AKA cool ship) they kind of intentionally allowed in, where as unintentional would be called infection, or more precisely contamination.  Domesticated I suppose would indicate a strain that was cultured and pitched on purpose. Any yeast could be any of the 3. Think of brett. If you open ferment and some gets in, thats wild. If you close ferment and some gets in thats an infection. If you go to a LHBS and buy some brett to pitch, thats domesticated. Back to the discussion at hand, I doubt the sanitizer knows if its wild, contamination, or domesticated.
So wolves, bears, and large cats bred for generations on zoos are domesticated?

3300
The Pub / Re: What to read
« on: November 12, 2014, 07:50:41 PM »
I would also add anything by Graham Greene and anything by Cormac McCarthy.  Blood Meridian is phenomenal.  The Road bothered me for ages.  Still does.  All The Pretty Horses is great, despite the movie. 

Avoid D.H. Lawrence.  I labored for most of the summer with The Plumed Serpent.  I gave up.  Not a proud moment, but I only have so much time.
Cormac McCarthy writes books that haunt me too, but are so rewarding to read. I only got have way through the last border trilogy book bracause as the wife says, "ain't going to have a happy ending".

I also read all of Edward Abbey's stuff when I was knocking around the Canyons and lousy stinking desert in the 90s.

If anyone is into the Southwest, Craig Childs has some excellent books.

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