Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: 1 ... 219 220 [221] 222 223 ... 542
3301
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Aerating Wort Techniques
« on: July 26, 2014, 07:06:04 AM »
A decent amount of I 2oz pulled in at the beginning of the starter but once fermentation kicks in its just about keeping the yeast in suspension again.  This is why I pump the air in so it gets air the whole time.  It's suppose to give the yeast more sterole reserves or something... Been awhile since I looked into it... Have just been doing it for quite awhile.  I think Kai wrote something about it not too long ago.

I have used my aquarium pump to get sterile filtered air into the top of the fermenter, to simulate open fermentation. Not sure if it helped, but it didn't hurt.

Hmm there's an idea... Never thought of that.  How long did you leave it on pumping air in?
3 days or so. It was for a Saison.

3302
Ingredients / Re: Fresh (Wet) Hops
« on: July 26, 2014, 07:03:39 AM »
My aroma varieties like Tett and Hallertau then Centennial will be ready first, then Cascade, Chinook, Sterling, Mt. Hood. Nugget is always last. You are a little head of us, but also a little south which explains some of that.

I dug out my Goldings last year.

Did you dig them out because they didn't produce or just didn't use them?

They would only produce a handful of small cones after good vegetative growth. Not worth the twine and effort to string them up. They might do better in a mild climate.

Good to know. I have the same result. Great vegetation growth with very few cones. It's coming out before the changes. I'll cut from my cascade in the spring to replace it.

Any experience with Mt. Hood or Perle?
My Hood does almost as good as Cascade. No Perle in my yard, so no idea.

3303
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Aerating Wort Techniques
« on: July 26, 2014, 04:03:12 AM »
A decent amount of I 2oz pulled in at the beginning of the starter but once fermentation kicks in its just about keeping the yeast in suspension again.  This is why I pump the air in so it gets air the whole time.  It's suppose to give the yeast more sterole reserves or something... Been awhile since I looked into it... Have just been doing it for quite awhile.  I think Kai wrote something about it not too long ago.

I have used my aquarium pump to get sterile filtered air into the top of the fermenter, to simulate open fermentation. Not sure if it helped, but it didn't hurt.

3304
Ingredients / Re: Fresh (Wet) Hops
« on: July 26, 2014, 03:59:03 AM »
My aroma varieties like Tett and Hallertau then Centennial will be ready first, then Cascade, Chinook, Sterling, Mt. Hood. Nugget is always last. You are a little head of us, but also a little south which explains some of that.

I dug out my Goldings last year.

Did you dig them out because they didn't produce or just didn't use them?

They would only produce a handful of small cones after good vegetative growth. Not worth the twine and effort to string them up. They might do better in a mild climate.

3305
Going Pro / Re: Tribute Brewing Company article
« on: July 25, 2014, 05:23:41 PM »
Eagle River WI, might get there before Leos place, as my sister lives in Florence WI.

3306
Ingredients / Re: Fresh (Wet) Hops
« on: July 25, 2014, 05:18:30 PM »
My aroma varieties like Tett and Hallertau then Centennial will be ready first, then Cascade, Chinook, Sterling, Mt. Hood. Nugget is always last. You are a little head of us, but also a little south which explains some of that.

I dug out my Goldings last year.




3307
Ingredients / Re: Fresh (Wet) Hops
« on: July 25, 2014, 03:32:13 PM »
I'm not sure you put enough in there frank. ;D
The one we did last fall had 24 oz off the bines, it could have used more. 40? Maybe.

Frank, let us know where you are at (I forget). Mine will be ready early this year, but still a week away for the early ones, the C hops will come later in August.

3308
The other specialty grains would be the Caramunich III, and the Carapils which Steve has suggested I not use.

Why would it dilute the Munich Malt if I mashed them together?

And what's your take on using the Carapils for better head retention?

Thanks
The specialty grains have no enzymes. Munich only has enough to convert itself. So if you did a mini-mash so 1 pound of each, you would end up with 1/3 the amount of Munich enzymes on a density basis.

3309
Thanks for the tip.  I'll do it and send you an update in a couple of months when I taste the first bottle.
To be clear, do the mini-mash on just the Munich malt. You can steep the other specialty grains separately. if you do them all together the Munich's enzymes will be too diluted.

3310
One thing to note is that most Ribes varieties are susceptible to white pine blister rust, so they are restricted or banned in many areas. Even if you are able to find an online supplier that will ship them to you (hint, hint ;) ), use good judgement whether it would it would be the best idea for your local flora to introduce Ribes plants.
Most Ribes were wiped out in the 40's-50's by Departments of Agriculture who wanted to protect white pines from the rust, but regulations in many states are relaxing lately. White pine blister rust kills white pines, but requires nearby Ribes plants to complete it's life cycle. Therefore - no Ribes = no rust.

A few details that can help us be responsible Ribes owners.

Black and golden currants are the worst carriers, so if you can go with another currant or gooseberries, that's good. Black and golden currants are banned in Delaware while other Ribes sp. are allowed. The ban was recently revised according to recommendations from University of Delaware pathologists.

There are rust-resistant varieties of Ribes, but they are only resistant to SYMPTOMS. They can still carry the disease and transfer it to nearby white pines.

The disease does require some proximity to pines to transfer. So if you plant Ribes, plant them >500ft from white pines if you can manage it. If you have a grove of white pines on your property that you love and you can't plant far away - maybe you should just plant some blueberries or another small fruit.

Thanks for that information. I know black currants are considered invasive in MI, but some fruit farms are grandfathered to grow them. New planting are prohibited. MI was logged for the white pines in the 1800s. Hardwoods were left, but then logged off for furniture and car bodies (Ford Woody). There are still some white pine in the state, and the an old growth stand is a state park.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hartwick_Pines_State_Park

3311
nice write up. Currants are common in Vermont where I grew up. I never really got into them though. Isn't kirsh black currant?
Do you mean Kirsch? That is German for cherry. There is a brandy called Kirsch, and Google says that is distilled from sour cherries.

3312
Beer Travel / Re: Albuquerque & Santa Fe
« on: July 25, 2014, 04:30:34 AM »
La Cumbre had some outstanding beers. Il Vicino has pretty good beer and really good pizza.

3313
I'm trying to make something similar to an Oktoberfest lager, but don't have the capability of fermenting at lager temperatures.  So I'm trying to put together an ale with a grain bill that's similar and see how it turns out.

I also don't like too much hops in my brew.
 
When you say don't bother with the Munich grain, steeping it in a grain bag for a while won't accomplish anything?

What other changes would you recommend?
Munich will convert itself, it does not have excess enzymes, so "steep" it in 1.5 qt. water/lb grain at about 155-158F for 45 min. to an hour. You will have converted the starches then. Oh, and you then can say you did a mini-mash, a step towards all grain brewing. Have fun.

3314
Ingredients / Re: Preparing Hops
« on: July 25, 2014, 04:21:31 AM »
The logic on myrcene seems plausible. It is pretty volatile, heck, it is hard to get into your beer.

3315
Ingredients / Re: Preparing Hops
« on: July 24, 2014, 08:40:22 PM »
if you toast your own oats or malt it's often recommended to let them off gas for a few days before brewing with them.
Malt also needs to condition for about a month after it has been kilned. That was from Dr. Bamforth at the NHC in SD, and he said no one knows why it is so. There is a small passage on it in Brewing by Lewis.

The one on hops is still new to me.

I do know brewers that stage the hops (weigh out and put in the brew house) for the next days brew, but that is timing and logistics.

Pages: 1 ... 219 220 [221] 222 223 ... 542