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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3496
Pimp My System / Re: My new brew sculpture
« on: August 10, 2014, 03:58:25 AM »
Nice sculpture, welcome to the forum.

3497
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New guy
« on: August 09, 2014, 06:44:18 PM »
Welcome to the forums. Some of us are seasoned veterans of Homebrewing, but have good manners and are house trained.  ;D

Effing typing skills, poor proof reading , and it goes south from there.

3498
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New guy
« on: August 09, 2014, 04:55:41 PM »
Welcome to the forums. Some of us are seasoned veterans of Homebrewing, but have good manners and are house trained.  ;D

3499
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: first competition entry
« on: August 09, 2014, 11:34:35 AM »
Look at the scores that are given to production beers in the Zymurgy Commercial Calibration columns. Usually 38 =/- a few points.

A 37 is a good score. Years back I won a Blue Ribbon is the State Fair with a 35. Things have gotten tougher in the last several years. Recently my beers score well, sometimes really well, and don't place.

3500
Going Pro / Re: Congratulation yellowhammer
« on: August 09, 2014, 11:30:46 AM »
How much bigger will this new place be?

3501
All Grain Brewing / Re: Burning your bag in BIAB?
« on: August 09, 2014, 05:38:38 AM »
Good point - Teflon tape will be added to the male threaded stainless QDC on the boil kettle.  I recirc for a while at the end of the boil to sanitize the hosing and pump, also.  I wonder if an air inlet can arise at any connection as the wort chills and the hosing goes from boil to 55F?
One of the well known brewers in my club will slightly crack open the inlet until he sees small bubbles in the outlet in the kettle when chilling, he does that to aerate before pitching.

The inlet side has low pressure, as the pump creates a vacuum pulling in the liquid. The outlet will have high pressure. Air can be drawn in on the inlet side due to the vacuum.

3502
All Grain Brewing / Re: Burning your bag in BIAB?
« on: August 09, 2014, 05:24:33 AM »
Jeff - I've always wondered if you could run into the infamous HSA (mostly myth at the homebrew level I know, but with too much recirc in this way???). I may try a modified, hillbilly RIMS one of these days to see if there is a discernible difference, since I just did an ultra careful, no splash, rack to boil kettle to see if it results in any discernible difference.

BTW, I have a neighbor who does the drain and pour method while applying heat to a mash that is stepping up through steps or just being boosted to correct mash/mash out and he says he gets no problems doing it that way.  And his beers are really good, too.

With the way I recirculate, where can extra air be introduced? The return is below the mash surface, the pump is not adding air.

I pump to the kettle through the outlet ball valve and dip tube, so the dip tube is covered as quick as if I racked in.

Pilsners brewed this way in the winter stay in good condition to the end of the summer - when they are gone.

I guess you are right, but when I do the recirc during chilling, I get some foaming, at times.

If your light lagers are holding up for months, you don't have stability problems.  Like I said HSA at the homebrew level is said to be a myth.  So, I may have to give it a try.

I don't get any foam. Check your fittings, the pump my be sucking in air on the inlet side.

3503
All Grain Brewing / Re: Burning your bag in BIAB?
« on: August 08, 2014, 07:01:27 AM »
Jeff - I've always wondered if you could run into the infamous HSA (mostly myth at the homebrew level I know, but with too much recirc in this way???). I may try a modified, hillbilly RIMS one of these days to see if there is a discernible difference, since I just did an ultra careful, no splash, rack to boil kettle to see if it results in any discernible difference.

BTW, I have a neighbor who does the drain and pour method while applying heat to a mash that is stepping up through steps or just being boosted to correct mash/mash out and he says he gets no problems doing it that way.  And his beers are really good, too.

With the way I recirculate, where can extra air be introduced? The return is below the mash surface, the pump is not adding air.

I pump to the kettle through the outlet ball valve and dip tube, so the dip tube is covered as quick as if I racked in.

Pilsners brewed this way in the winter stay in good condition to the end of the summer - when they are gone.

3504
All Grain Brewing / Re: Burning your bag in BIAB?
« on: August 07, 2014, 01:25:04 PM »
If you don't heat your kettle during the mash you never have to worry about scorching. Insulating your kettle during the mash should help you keep your heat loss to an acceptable level.

If you're thinking of doing step mashes with BIAB, I think you're a lot better off doing it as a separate infusion. Directly heating your kettle during the mash can create hot spots. If you're worried about scorching your bag you should have the same concerns about the enzymes in your mash as well.
You can apply heat if the grains and bag are not close to the bottom of the kettle. I think the guy in the club recirculates while applying heat. If I make it to the club meeting on Friday I can ask him.
 
As for the enzymes denaturing, well many in this area do a RIMS approach all of the time with a false bottom and a pump. You just need to be judicious with the heat.
Yes, you will denature enzymes. I had a slew of beers I did with brew in a bag that wouldn't finish below 1.020, even with lots of healthy yeast, pure o2, and low mash temps. I would stir, but it wasn't enough, the heat on the bottom of the kettle was much warmer than what my thermometer near the top was reading... and now I know...

That is why the pump comes in handy. You pump from under the false bottom, and have the return coming back submerged in the grainbed. As I said, use judicious heat, not a blast. That way the wort does not get too hot. No problems with that system/technique. If you don't have a valve to drain/recirculate I do see issues.

3505
If you have heard Stan Hieronymus speak at the NHC and follow what he writes on hops, he talks about biotranformantions that happen when the yeast are active. For example, it has been found that Linalool concentration goes up during fermentation. Matt Brynildson of Firestone Walker like to add dry hops with 1 or 2 Plato left in the fermentation so that the yeast can work on the hop oils. Vinnie Cilurzo at Russian River like to remove the hops. I think it comes down to what aromas the brewer is after. As homebrewers, we can do both if we wish.

3506
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Water
« on: August 06, 2014, 07:59:36 PM »
My tap water is too alkaline to even mess with. RO with adjustments for me.

3507
Going Pro / Re: Consistency
« on: August 06, 2014, 05:33:40 PM »
So I'm gathering that it is not a matter of having a lab and testing/adjusting variables - that it is more about knowing your system and scrupulously following a recipe.  yes?
Yes, not many breweries have a well equipped lab and the personnel to run it.

3508
Beer Recipes / Re: English Summer Ale
« on: August 05, 2014, 08:48:36 AM »
I would go with the light carastan from Bairds, only 17-20L and it does give some appropriate flavors. The regular carstan at ~35L might be another choice. The Golden Ales I have had are really light  in color, but still have that British flavor.

3509
All Grain Brewing / Re: Burning your bag in BIAB?
« on: August 05, 2014, 08:44:15 AM »
If you don't heat your kettle during the mash you never have to worry about scorching. Insulating your kettle during the mash should help you keep your heat loss to an acceptable level.

If you're thinking of doing step mashes with BIAB, I think you're a lot better off doing it as a separate infusion. Directly heating your kettle during the mash can create hot spots. If you're worried about scorching your bag you should have the same concerns about the enzymes in your mash as well.
You can apply heat if the grains and bag are not close to the bottom of the kettle. I think the guy in the club recirculates while applying heat. If I make it to the club meeting on Friday I can ask him.
 
As for the enzymes denaturing, well many in this area do a RIMS approach all of the time with a false bottom and a pump. You just need to be judicious with the heat.

3510
Equipment and Software / Re: Cheap kettle turned wort black?
« on: August 04, 2014, 07:46:37 PM »
Did it say anything about the SS on the packaging? Or what is the brand? We have a SS Wallmart pot that was from the wife's parents kitchen when we closed out the house. It had been used, but was fine. Looking up the brand I found it was 304, which is good for what we do.

If it was new you could have been getting some manufacturing oils off.

Boiling to season should not be required for SS. I would give a new pot a wash with hot soapy water to remove any oils.

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