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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3586
Events / Re: Do the exhibitors/vendors sell things at NHC?
« on: June 25, 2012, 09:45:11 AM »
Of course the Brewers Publication stand has always had books for sale, and AHA shirts and hats. How could I forget that?

3587
All Grain Brewing / Re: NHC Second Rounders...Batch or Fly Sparge?
« on: June 25, 2012, 09:43:27 AM »
I had 4 beers in the 2nd round: light lager, german pils, belgian pale ale, and flanders red....all batch sparged.
In case you guys don't know David got a medal.

3588
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: That German lager flavor
« on: June 25, 2012, 09:40:41 AM »
hopfen,

you mention lots of yeast. This seems to be important across the board with lager. I have also heard that if you get enough healthy yeast a D-rest is not really needed. Is this your experience? I ask because when I do a lager I will be getting lots of yeast from the local brewery. If I pitch a quart of 1 day - 1 week old yeast slurry do I need to do a D-rest?

One reason to do the D-rest is if you can taste diacetyl. A good test is to warm a sample up to room temp and taste. The other reason is to speed the fermentation up for a shorter time length, and the increased activity will blow off more SO2.

Yes pitching a lot of healthy yeast at a temp cooler than your fermentation will reduce Diacetyl production.

3589
Events / Re: NHC 2012 pics
« on: June 25, 2012, 09:34:42 AM »
I got to meet with Ron, Keith, Sean and garc_mall. Talked with Denny, Tom, and Jeffy, who I had known from previous NHC's.

I told Tom that the conference was outstanding from my viewpoint.

I also briefly talked to Drew when he was serving. Talked to David Barber after he got his medal - good show!

Saw Martin several times but he was always in a conversation, and I didn't want to butt in.

Had the opportunity to talk to AJ Delange and thank him for the stuff I have read on water over the last several years.

Talked to Gordon several times. Before we checked out we went to the rent a car place close by in Bellevue and got a car. Came back to the hotel and parked. Someone loudly said "you rented THAT". Turned around and it was Gordon. The car is a Mustang Convertible, said it was a free upgrade as they were out of midsized cars. Gordon said - "I hate you" while grinning. A handshake for me, and a hug for Susan.  There is enough sun and warmth to drive around the Yakima valley with the top down. Life is good!



3590
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: That German lager flavor
« on: June 25, 2012, 09:19:34 AM »
I was out at the NHC, and had limited internet access, and was having too much fun. Time to put my views on here.

What is the most important part? All of it. Think like a German brewer would. Pay attention to the details in the entire process, be as exacting as you can. Don't cut corners. Read through what Kai has to say on braukaiser.com as that is a wonderful resource for making German beers. Big thanks to Kai for doing that.

It also helps to have German brewed beers as fresh as possible for comparisons. This is hard sometimes. Often the beers here in the US have honey in the aroma, and that is a sign of staling (2,3 pentanedione). The bitterness starts to have a roughness to it when the beers get old. The same beer in Germany has no honey aroma and a smooth bitterness. If you have a chance to go to Germany, do it!

Yeast. I have been using the 34/70 strain (WLP-830, WY-2124) for my dry German beers and the WLP-833 for malty German beers. I have heard good things about the WY-2352 yeast, and had a Helles made with that at the NHC. It is said to be the Augusteiner yeast, so I need to try that one.

Water. I follow Kai's water profiles.

Malt. German malt. Durst Pils can help make a bone dry pils. Weyermann is good for all of their malts. I have only used a little Best Malz. Where can I find more types other than Pils?

Hops. One thing you need to know is that "Hallertau" from the LHBS can be several varities grown in the Hallertau. I seek out Hallertau Mittelfrueh on the label to get the one I want. Hallertau Tradition is OK. Magnum works for bittering. Tettnager is a favorite, but was hard to find in cones last year. I have used Saaz in German Pils with good results. An interesting fact from the Hop talk by Stan Heironimous was Tattnanger, Spalt, and Saaz are genetically the same, but the growing region gives different results. Herkules is on I have been looking at for future brews, and Stan said it is going to become very popular.

Process: Hochkurz, chill to 45F, pitch a bunch of yeast, O2, ferment cool, I do a D-rest to clean up and blow of SO2, lager for a long time as cold as you can.












3591
Events / Re: NHC 2012 pics
« on: June 24, 2012, 10:04:12 PM »
I got to meet with Ron, Keith, Sean and garc_mall. Talked with Denny, Tom, and Jeffy, who I had known from previous NHC's.

I told Tom that the conference was outstanding from my viewpoint.

3592
All Grain Brewing / Re: NHC Second Rounders...Batch or Fly Sparge?
« on: June 19, 2012, 02:15:43 PM »
None made it to the second round this year. In the previous 3 years I had beers in the final round. Those were all fly-sparged.

3593
Events / Re: Do the exhibitors/vendors sell things at NHC?
« on: June 18, 2012, 05:25:38 PM »
From my experience it is stuff to look at.

If you are there at the right times hop samples and swag are on the table for the taking.

3594
The Pub / Re: Flying w/beer in checked-in luggage
« on: June 15, 2012, 07:42:47 AM »
Brought ~20 pounds of beer into the US and ~30 back into France. No problems on either side.

What about customs?
I have never had a problem at customs. Have it declared. They might chat about good German beer, but it isn't worth their time to collect the per bottle duty (it is pretty small change) and fill out the paperwork. They have better things to do, like keeping socialist sausage out of the country. Or something like that.

3596
Equipment and Software / Re: How big for a homebrewer?
« on: June 13, 2012, 05:49:04 AM »
Well, not to be the buzzkill (pun intended), isn't the legal limit 200 gallons per year for a household with 2 or more adults?

That is true for US homebrewers. The OP is from Ontario, Canada. What is the legal limit there?

3597
Equipment and Software / Re: How big for a homebrewer?
« on: June 12, 2012, 05:40:29 PM »
Blichmann has some big stuff that some nanos use.

More beer has the big tippy dump system.

Other suggestions above.

3598
All Grain Brewing / Re: Is my water any good for all-grain brewing?
« on: June 12, 2012, 11:16:51 AM »
As I have learned recently learned, the main thing you want to focus on is your mash pH at room temp. You want it to be between 5.2 and 5.5. Bru n' Water is great because you can plug in your water profile, your recipe, and any water additions you make. Be sure to list if the grain you are putting in is a roasted grain or a crystal grain, as this will help to acidify the mash. You can use Calcium to help lower your pH along with delusion using RO water or distilled water. Once you get your pH in that range (found on the 'Mash Acidification' sheet) you will be good to go.
Another thing is to look at your sulfate to chloride ratio. You get these from calcium chloride and calcium sulfate (gypsum). A .5 ratio will give you a beer that highlights malt. Flip that ratio or even widen it (4:1 or even 7:1) and you will get the hop flavor you want.
Mash pH and Sulfate to Chloride ratio - those are the biggies.

I don't think that calcium lowers your pH, it buffers acids and thus can raise your pH. Roasted and crystal malts, acid malt, or just acid are used to lower pH. Salts, pickling lime, chalk, gypsum are used to either buffer acids or raise pH and to provide needed trace minerals to the yeast.

Calcium lowers the pH, and to a lesser extent Mg. The Ca reacts with phytin from the malt and produces an H+ ion, more H+ ions by definition result in a lower pH. Gypsum doesn't raise pH.

okay now I am confused. Calcium creates a more acidic solution? I thought it was an acid buffer. hmmm. well learn something new everyday.
From howtobrew.com by John Palmer.
'In 1953, P. Kohlbach determined that 3.5 equivalents (Eq) of calcium reacts with malt phytin to release 1 equivalent of hydrogen ions which can "neutralize" 1 equivalent of water alkalinity. Magnesium, the other water hardness ion, also works but to a lesser extent, needing 7 equivalents to neutralize 1 equivalent of alkalinity. Alkalinity which is not neutralized is termed "residual alkalinity" (abbreviated RA). On a per volume basis, this can be expressed as:
mEq/L RA = mEq/L Alkalinity - [(mEq/L Ca)/3.5 + (mEq/L Mg)/7]
where mEq/L is defined as milliequivalents per liter."

3599
All Grain Brewing / Re: Is my water any good for all-grain brewing?
« on: June 12, 2012, 10:09:40 AM »
As I have learned recently learned, the main thing you want to focus on is your mash pH at room temp. You want it to be between 5.2 and 5.5. Bru n' Water is great because you can plug in your water profile, your recipe, and any water additions you make. Be sure to list if the grain you are putting in is a roasted grain or a crystal grain, as this will help to acidify the mash. You can use Calcium to help lower your pH along with delusion using RO water or distilled water. Once you get your pH in that range (found on the 'Mash Acidification' sheet) you will be good to go.
Another thing is to look at your sulfate to chloride ratio. You get these from calcium chloride and calcium sulfate (gypsum). A .5 ratio will give you a beer that highlights malt. Flip that ratio or even widen it (4:1 or even 7:1) and you will get the hop flavor you want.
Mash pH and Sulfate to Chloride ratio - those are the biggies.

I don't think that calcium lowers your pH, it buffers acids and thus can raise your pH. Roasted and crystal malts, acid malt, or just acid are used to lower pH. Salts, pickling lime, chalk, gypsum are used to either buffer acids or raise pH and to provide needed trace minerals to the yeast.

Calcium lowers the pH, and to a lesser extent Mg. The Ca reacts with phytin from the malt and produces an H+ ion, more H+ ions by definition result in a lower pH. Gypsum doesn't raise pH.

3600
My set up is different, but this will give you an idea. Good write up by Jamil Z.  Pictures at the bottom.
http://www.mrmalty.com/chiller.php

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