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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3616
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Training up the new Assistant brewer
« on: December 09, 2013, 05:35:50 PM »
Those are going to be some good memories for him!

3617
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 09, 2013, 05:34:01 PM »
I'd rather have a long conversation about spelling conventions and the etymological roots of words than deal with a siphon.  I was mightily pleased with myself when I figured out I could start them with pressure, rather than fill and drain into a glass.
It is much easier to simply suck start the siphon.  I can usually use pressure, but sometimes I need to start it manually.  I have a ~1 foot piece of tubing that fits snugly over the racking tubing - sanitize everything, suck on the end to start the siphon, pull off the extra bit of tubing, and rack away.

+1. This is what I have settled into most times. If I have a bucket of sanitizer, that can be used to fill the cane and tube, put cane in beer, start siphon by draining into something to dispose the sanitizer, and when it is all beer go to the receiving vessel.

3618
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash temp for a barleywine?
« on: December 09, 2013, 10:01:25 AM »
Many recommend 149-151F for single infusions. I have been doing many beers at 153F, as Greg Doss reported the maximum fermentability for that temperature a couple years back at the NHC. Think local maximum of the curve.

have you seen any interesting results with bigger beers doing this? I read that presentation but I seem to have a block, I still head straight for 148 when the gravity gets up there.

Actually I did a partigyle English BW this weekend and I over heated my strike water so it came in at right around 154. I left it for 90 minutes so we will see.

To answer the OP I like 148 or less because I think even if it finishes a little low (1.010ish) there will be so much sweetness and body just from the alcohol that it will still be a sipper.
Another question one can have is how does the curve look for an English Pale Ale malt, vs the Pils malt in the experiment.

and wasn't the mash time 45 minutes in all cases in that study?
I would have to go back and check, but he did a time study too, and found 75 min. to yield the maximum.

3619
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash temp for a barleywine?
« on: December 09, 2013, 09:25:44 AM »
Many recommend 149-151F for single infusions. I have been doing many beers at 153F, as Greg Doss reported the maximum fermentability for that temperature a couple years back at the NHC. Think local maximum of the curve.

have you seen any interesting results with bigger beers doing this? I read that presentation but I seem to have a block, I still head straight for 148 when the gravity gets up there.

Actually I did a partigyle English BW this weekend and I over heated my strike water so it came in at right around 154. I left it for 90 minutes so we will see.

To answer the OP I like 148 or less because I think even if it finishes a little low (1.010ish) there will be so much sweetness and body just from the alcohol that it will still be a sipper.
Another question one can have is how does the curve look for an English Pale Ale malt, vs the Pils malt in the experiment.

3620
Going Pro / Re: CSB (Community Supported Breweries)
« on: December 09, 2013, 08:19:52 AM »
I wonder if there is a legal distinction being made between selling 'beer' and selling a 'membership'.

Check out crowdbrewed.com. Particularly J Wakefield Brewing who raise over 100k (more than 200% of the original campaign goal). They are providing beer in one form or another at many of the pledge levels but they are all in the form of a membership.

If joining the membership includes a portion of free beer then no, there is no legal distinction.

I took a look at what info was available on that website. It's highly suspect but at least taking the website at face value they aren't really crowdsourcing. They are selling private placements to accredited investors in which investors are taking on equity in the company, at least as far the offer I found on the website. We'll see how long the SEC lets that stick around.
At least for the J Wakefield Brewer, no contribution level, even for $5000, mentions equity.
A place not too far from here had various start up investment levels. I think an equity share was $25k, and that was 8 or 10 years ago.

3621
Equipment and Software / Re: Beer Engine
« on: December 09, 2013, 07:00:16 AM »
You can make a poor man's cask breather out of a low pressure propane regulator for about $30 or less. They is how we serve the beer with a hand pump, and then return it to a cold room/fridge when done for the night, as we don't go through that much in a night.

3622
The Pub / Re: Fake Brew Dog pub in China
« on: December 09, 2013, 06:52:29 AM »
"screw that, let's just turn it into advertising."

aka BrewDog's solution to everything.
Hmmm...

How about if the brew good beer. Dead squirrel on the bottle - no thanks.
Brew dog. Mehh...

In spite of the marketing crap, they do indeed make great beer. Perhaps it suffers from the long voyage across the seas?
At a club meeting a guy shared a Tactical Nuclear Penguin. The small sip of that hot mess of a beer was all I needed. I don't think the trip across the Atlantic was responsible for that.

3623
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Air Cooling
« on: December 09, 2013, 06:46:53 AM »
You guys can divide up my share of snow between you.
Carl, 0/2=0.  :)


3624
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash temp for a barleywine?
« on: December 08, 2013, 08:13:03 PM »
Many recommend 149-151F for single infusions. I have been doing many beers at 153F, as Greg Doss reported the maximum fermentability for that temperature a couple years back at the NHC. Think local maximum of the curve.

3625
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Air Cooling
« on: December 08, 2013, 08:08:08 PM »
As Carl points out, the snow will melt away from the chiller so you have to pack it back against the pot periodically. I use snow in the cooler to recirculate through the chiller for lagers, and the supply can be very large sometimes, but right now is 0 in my part of frozen MI. About time to brew some Pilsners, so come on snow!

3626
The diacetyl precursor can oxidize to diacetyl. This has happened to me.

3627
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: To clone or not to clone
« on: December 08, 2013, 09:00:33 AM »
I hope this isn't seen as advertising, but for those of you who want to brew recipes from breweries ("clones" or not), there's a new book coming out in Jan.


http://www.qbookshop.com/products/211160/9780760344743/Craft-Beer-for-the-Homebrewer.html

Here are the recipes....

CHAPTER 1: Pale Ales & IPAs.................................................12
8-Bit, Tallgrass Brewing Company................................................14
Capt’n Crompton’s Pale Ale, Epic Brewing....................................18
Elevated IPA, La Cumbre Brewing Company.................................20
Furious, Surly Brewing Company.................................................24
Hop Stoopid, Lagunitas Brewing Company...................................26
Maharaja, Avery Brewing Company..............................................30
Spiral Jetty, Epic Brewing ..........................................................34
Thrust!, Red Eye Brewing Company.............................................38
Watershed IPA, Oakshire Brewing................................................40
CHAPTER 2: Porter s & Stouts..............................................44
Buffalo Sweat, Tallgrass Brewing Company...................................46
Malpais Stout, La Cumbre Brewing Company................................48
Smoke, Surly Brewing Company..................................................50
Snowstorm 2009 Baltic Porter, August Schell Brewing Company....54
CHAPTER 3: Wheat & Rye Beers.............................................58
Bittersweet Lenny’s R.I.P.A., Shmaltz Brewing..............................60
Little Sumpin’ Sumpin’ Ale, Lagunitas Brewing Company..............64
Rugbrød, The Bruery..................................................................66
Wiley’s Rye Ale, Stone Cellar Brewpub.........................................70
CHAPTER 4: Belgians.............................................................74
Allagash Black, Allagash Brewing Company..................................76
Allagash Curieux, Allagash Brewing Company...............................80
Matacabras, Dave’s BrewFarm.....................................................82
Funkwerks Saison, Funkwerks.....................................................84
Salvation, Avery Brewing Company..............................................88
Scarlet 7, Red Eye Brewing Company..........................................90
Saison Rue, The Bruery..............................................................94
CHAPTER 5: Other Ales..........................................................96
90 Shilling Ale, Odell Brewing Company......................................98
Dead Guy Ale, Rogue Ales..........................................................102
El Lector, Cigar City Brewing.......................................................106
Hazelnut Brown Nectar, Rogue Ales.............................................110
Hellion, TRVE Brewing...............................................................112
Ill-Tempered Gnome, Oakshire Brewing........................................116
Imperial Red Ale, Marble Brewery................................................118
Kölsch 151, Blue Mountain Brewery............................................122
Levitation, Stone Brewing Company.............................................126
Nugget Nectar, Tröegs Brewing Company......................................130
Xenu, Cigar City Brewing............................................................134
CHAPTER 6: Lagers.................................................................136
Select, Dave’s BrewFarm............................................................138
Coney Island Mermaid Pilsner, Shmaltz Brewing...........................142
Schell’s Pils, August Schell Brewing Company..............................144

I like that there are some recipes for La Cumbra and Marble in there. Those were fine beers we had a year back in NM.

3628
Wood/Casks / Re: Styles for wine barrel
« on: December 08, 2013, 08:17:08 AM »
The cub did a Saison in a Cab. barrel that was tasty.

I would stick with a yeast driven beer, as barrels strip some of the hop character. A big malty beer might work, but I have no experience.

3629
Ingredients / Re: Centennial Fruit loop beers
« on: December 08, 2013, 07:13:21 AM »
I would try letting your beer clear a bit, rack to secondary and then do your dry hopping. Stan Hieronymous wrote an article in Zymurgy earlier this year about dry hopping experiments he did. The takeaway was that he felt that hop aroma and flavor was better in beers dry hopped this way. The reason: dry hopping in primary with a fair amount of yeast still in suspension can produce some undesireable aromas/flavors from the interaction of hop compounds with excess yeast. I switched to doing this and I like my hop aroma/flavor better than before - it seems cleaner and better. I'd be curious to see if it prevented this in the future for you. It might.
What I got from Stan's NHC talk and articles is that some yeast still in the active stage will give a bio-transformation into aromas that you won't get otherwise. Those are aromas that are desire able, and some brewers like Matt Brynildson of Firestone Walker dry hop in primary with about 1 Plato to go, and may add mor dry hops later. On the other hand, Vinnie Cilurzo drops the yeast to dry hop. Both techniques work, I think one needs to think of the desired finished beer aroma, the hops being used, and then select the process to achieve the results.

3630
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: December 07, 2013, 05:50:05 PM »
This is a Ward report for softened well water; the location is about 15 miles south of San Francisco, in a hilly section about a half-mile from the ocean.

pH7.6
TDS Estppm 538
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm0.90
Cations / Anions, me/L8.2 / 8.2
Sodium, Na186
Potassium, K< 1
Calcium, Ca < 1
Magnesium, Mg< 1
Total Hardness, CaCO37
Nitrate, NO3-N5.8 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S 10
Chloride, Cl 199
Carbonate, CO3 < 1
Bicarbonate, HCO3 92
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 75
Total Phosphorus, P 0.04
Total Iron, Fe< 0.01

From taste, most of the Sodium and Chloride is from the softener.  I appreciate this thread as it's challenging me to learn water chemistry for brewing but really to get a grasp of the house well water as well (for things like skin care - need to drop the Ph).

Brew-wise, my darker beers taste great, my IPA hop aroma fades within 2 months, and I've never had a crisp snappy taste on anything like a Pilsner.  The one local pro brewer who has similar water is diluting half with RO and adding gypsum, advising to read up and use Bru'n Water.  The numbers make sense when using Martin's spreadsheet, it's nicely done.

Asking openly: 

What's your process for measuring mash Ph and adjusting?  Do you measure when the grist is added and/or adjust over time?

Decarbonating by boiling:  any advice on how long or how hot to heat the water?  My water heater puts out quite a bit of what looks like baking soda when I clean it, so I'm wondering if it makes sense to start decarbonating using the heated water as a source.

Many thanks.
Your sodium is high, greater than 150 ppm. Very low Ca And Mg, so the softener works.

This might work for extract batches, but you are adding the minerals to the minerals in the extract.

Most say not to use the water from the heater.

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