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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3616
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Tell me about Mash Hopping
« on: April 27, 2012, 04:47:35 AM »
I'd say it's a West coast mindset on hops, but he (Smith) is from Minnesota, so I guess it is just a hophead's mindset.....

I think he lives in Oakland, CA. I certainly see him at a lot of local beer events...
Yes, he is a member of DOZE, which is an east Bay Area club.

3617
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Question about styles
« on: April 27, 2012, 04:43:13 AM »
Cream ale is a Faux American Lager. It mainly uses American malt ingredients such as 6-row or 2-row, and corn as an adjunct, hops can be whatever. Clean ale yeast is used, though some could use lager yeast at a higher temperature. Lawnmower beer.

Koelsch is a Faux Pilsner. As said above it uses Pils malt, some versions use wheat, noble hops to a low level.  It is fermented cool and lagered for about a month. Some Koelsch yeast have a faint white wine aroma. These are very smooth and easy drinking. German lawnmower beer in the area of Cologne.

3618
Beer Recipes / Re: Light Ale Recipe
« on: April 26, 2012, 03:38:55 PM »
WLP830 is a great yeast for just about any lager. WLP840 if your shooting for Bud. Wyeast 2035 is pretty good for American styles. I just got WLP940. I brewed a light lager with it yesterday. 4.5 gallons at 1.040 and pitched an active 1.030 2L starter that I had going at 50F. My wife needs a lower calorie beer and it will be over 100F here by the time it's ready. I never made one so light before. It's really just growing yeast for my summer lagers anyway.
Here is what I put together.
http://hopville.com/recipe/1313226/lite-american-lager-recipes/el-cortador

The WLP-940 is one that I must try. The local lager brewery uses it and the beers are very good, right up with the beers they use 833 to make.

3619
Zymurgy / Re: "New Rules of Brewing Water" - Same as the old rules?
« on: April 26, 2012, 03:32:31 PM »
John's spreadsheet is based on "armwaving at its best" as he says. Actualy something from one of the German brewing scientists (Narziss?) that has a loose linkage of color and RA. People like Kai and Martin have a good handle on things now. Gordon Strong has comments in his book about making "Alka Seltzer" beers or something like that, if you follow some spreadsheets.



3620
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st round NHC results
« on: April 26, 2012, 02:43:47 PM »
As a fairly active judge who lives out in the sticks, I'd love to see a small stipend that would at least cover gas.  I could see a higher fee being used to both raise revenue and lower entry numbers.  Not sure how expensive you'd have to make an entry to accomplish the latter.  After all we've demonstrated we have some disposable income just through our brewing hobby.
I don't live in the sticks, but did drive the 300 miles to Indianapolis. Saw family in Indiana, got judging points, said high to some judges I know, and got to talk with Martin for a while.

Money for gas would be nice, but not necessary.

3621
Zymurgy / Re: "New Rules of Brewing Water" - Same as the old rules?
« on: April 26, 2012, 02:36:08 PM »
my ph tends to be in range every time with no additions.  i don't usually get concerned to match a water profile to the particular beer i am brewing or hitting a style precisely.   i am just curious if i am mostly alone in this or if others just brew with what they have on tap as well.

I assume your tap water comes from Lake Michigan.  Most around the metro area here have water that comes from Lake Huron (very similar profile), and most do not have to do anything for water as the tap water is great for mid color range beers.  I have well water with alkalinity that is very high, and a RA that is ideal for very dark porters/stouts.  I have to do something for Pilsners or they would not be quite right.

A friend who has the Lake water has recently been adjusting with 1/2 RO, and says his beers have the crispness now that he could never get before.


3622
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st round NHC results
« on: April 26, 2012, 02:20:24 PM »
I have also had a Pils that was over 40 first round, but was given a kind score of 28 in the second round, as I got hurried in the bottling, and it had Diacetyl, as did the control bottle  That prompted me buy a beer gun.

I don't understand why a beer gun would prevent diacetyl.
Precursor exposed to air = diacetyl.  Beergun has the CO2 purge feature. It was a Pilsner, nothing to hide behind.

Edit: toured Bells at an AHA rally in 2008. Their bottling line does a double purge with CO2 before filling.




3623
Martin is the pro on water.  I have a little knowledge, mainly forced by my tap water that is loaded with HCO3 to about 362 ppm.

If there is a specific way to remove SO4, we have to wait for Martin to say.

The Pros use industrial sized RO systems.  If you tour Stone they point that unit out, and blend with the tap water. Much of that part of CA gets water from the Colorado River, which is loaded with minerals downriver.  High in SO4 IIRC.  The river flows through some gypsum beds in Utal, I have seen those with my own eyes.

3624
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st round NHC results
« on: April 26, 2012, 11:29:28 AM »
I would like to point out that some beers of mine have done very well at a competition, only to have gone downhill for the next a month later. That happens to some beers fast.

I have also had a Pils that was over 40 first round, but was given a kind score of 28 in the second round, as I got hurried in the bottling, and it had Diacetyl, as did the control bottle  That prompted me buy a beer gun.

At a local comp I got an 18 for a DIPA, that was loaded with Diacetyl.  "WTF" I said when I read the sheets at home and pulled out another bottle, no Diacetyl. At the next club meeting no one could detect any Diacetyl.  I just marked this down as a bad bottle, and have taken the action of being really thurough with cleaning the bottles, then baking in the oven at 375F for an hour to sterilize.  Bad bottles happen sometimes. 

This should point out that the beer can taste great from the keg at home. Getting it in good shape in front of the judges is a challange that you have to face if you compete.   

3625
I would just use RO water and build up with minerals if you want single digits of SO4.

Take any city water number with a grain of salt (pun alert).  Burton on Trent has many different values depending on the well used for analysis. Vienna is one that has a lot of dicussion, as you would have a hard time making a Vienna Lager with that water. Turns out there is more than one source.  I think there is a discussion of the Vienna water in "Designing Great Beers".

3626
Zymurgy / Re: "New Rules of Brewing Water" - Same as the old rules?
« on: April 26, 2012, 08:04:25 AM »
Martin and AJ DeLange are involved with reviewing the book.
 
The Cl to SO4 ratio for the typical Munich water reports say they should be brewing hoppy beers in Munich. The values are both in single digits, so it really does not apply so much in that case. I agree with your viewpoint on this.

John was the guess speaker at the WEB competition in Frankenmuth MI. He did talk about Kai's work determining the acidity of the various malts, and that crystal was more acidic than people thought. His example was tied to the color model in his spreadsheet, though.


3627
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st round NHC results
« on: April 26, 2012, 05:22:34 AM »
Good scores OP. Looks like both of us will be right on the dividing line of beers that make it to the finals and those that don't.

I just received my scores as well (St. Paul). This was my second contest and i received a 37 and a 42 for my American Stout. Both judges dinged my beer for being a bit too bitter but left mostly positive comments.

Question: are you allowed to fine tune your recipe if you brew a new batch for the final round? I doubt i will advance but am curious nonetheless.

Yes you can rebrew. Some beers would not be in peak shape in the time from first round entry to second round judging.

3628
I believe Pilsner Urquell used to boil for 120 minutes.
At one time read that they did longer than that, but it was a weak boil, more of a simmer.

3629
Going Pro / Re: I froze my Mizer.
« on: April 25, 2012, 06:08:30 PM »
I get my 10lb tank filled for about $19.00. So $1.90/lb.
5Lb=$10
10Lb = $13
20Lb = $15

This is at a fire safety shop.

3630
Does a "Midwest IPA" just require a hefty addition of corn?

 - Kyle (from Indiana)

Some of say we are the North Coast.

Some are a little more malty in the East.  The West Coast IPAs have a simple malt bill and a ton of hops, bone dr finish on some.

The ones around here are more "Balanced".

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