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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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3661
All Things Food / Re: Roasted Bone Marrow
« on: March 02, 2014, 10:53:24 AM »
The marrow in an Oso Buco is yummy. That picture makes me hungry.

3662
Equipment and Software / Re: PBW 101
« on: March 02, 2014, 10:51:41 AM »
Anyone ever run PBW through an automatic coffee maker?
It sure worked great on the carafe and my nasty old thermos.

Brilliant! I've used it to break up burnt-on crud on pots and pans, but never thought about running it through the Keurig. I'm thinking PBW > vinegar (to neutralize & help dissolve scale) > 2x hot water rinse should do the trick
The scale in mine is most likely calcium carbonate from our mineral laden water. An acid like vinegar will take care of it. If you don't use vinegar or other acids, coffee makers last a year around here.

PBW works great on organic deposits, so it will take care of the brown build up in a carafe.

3663
Ingredients / Re: Pellet Hops - Vacuum Sealed bag or jar?
« on: March 02, 2014, 07:34:23 AM »
After Jeff's comment about Mylar bags being the best, curiosity got the best out of me. I don't believe light to be an issue since it's pretty well dark all of the time in the freezer, but I looked these things up. Well, Mylar bags are fairly cheaper than food savor bags. On amazon, you can get 50 quart sized Mylar bags for $16. I buy boxes of 20 quart sized food savor bags at Walmart for $10 or $12.
My opinion is that in the freezer, it is a moot point on the light.

3664
Ingredients / Re: Pellet Hops - Vacuum Sealed bag or jar?
« on: March 02, 2014, 06:46:14 AM »
At the 2010 NHC in Minneapolis the Gorst Valley Hops guys said the food saver bags are O2 barrier bags, ziplock are not. Mylar was better as no light could get through. How the food saver bag material compares to glass, I don't know.

3665
Equipment and Software / Re: PBW 101
« on: March 02, 2014, 06:33:02 AM »
Anyone ever run PBW through an automatic coffee maker?
It sure worked great on the carafe and my nasty old thermos.
I have not used it on the coffee maker, but PBW made an old SS thermos very shiny on the inside.

Our coffee maker needs to have vinegar run through it to dissolve scale. The carafe, I would just use PBW and hot tap water.

3666
The Pub / Re: Rain finally
« on: March 01, 2014, 09:11:22 AM »
Glad you are getting the water you need out there.

If it warms up here and we get rain, I fear flooding will be our issue. The snow banks at the end of the drive are about 6 ft high. Snowing again right now.

3667
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Duplicating the best DIPA's at home
« on: March 01, 2014, 09:02:27 AM »
Most pro brewers use whirlpool additions for a good portion of their late hops. This really amps up the flavor and aroma contributions of the hops, and the bitterness seems to be a lot smoother (similar to First Wort Hopping to my palate).

As a homebrewer, if you don't have a whirlpool you can still approximate this by using a hop stand (adding your flameout hops, then letting them steep hot for 30-90 minutes). IME, that's the only way to come close to (or even exceed) that saturated hop flavor you find in commercial IPA's.

That, and use a whole lot of hops. I'm using just over a pound of hops in a 3-gallon batch of IPA right now, and I might push that even further the next time I brew my "house" IPA recipe.

I didn't know about doing a hop stand.  However, doesn't that negate some of the desired effects of late hop additions, them being the aroma hops that are usually added during the last 1-5 minutes of the boil?  Wouldn't leaving those "aroma" hops in the almost boiling wort for 45 minutes essentially "boil away" the aroma oils?  Or, are those aroma contributions dwarfed by the massive dry hopping you are doing anyway?

Add the hops after flame out. The stand gives some aroma, but very good flavor development. You can add some of the hops at 170F or even 120F if you want more aroma. Dry hopping gives the big aroma in most of these beers.

Another trick is to do dry hopping several times. Sometimes the hops are left for 7 days, then add more for 3 days. PtY is said to have something like 4 dry hop additions.

There are some shows on the Brewing Network that cover making IPAs. The one with Firestone Walkers Matt Brynildson was very good.

3668
Events / Re: NHC - 2014 Mashing in Michigan Registration
« on: March 01, 2014, 08:57:52 AM »
Those that were holding off on plans due to the lottery can now make those plans.

I liked the low stress with signing up. Hope the hotel registration is not the big crunch this year.

Projecting the demand for San Diego might be a little tricky

3669
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Bigfoot Vertical '95 2003-1014
« on: March 01, 2014, 07:29:54 AM »
Why do you think the older ones are less carbonated?

I can't imagine the caps leak.
Sierra Nevada went to the pry off cap when they found a superior liner material. That material had much less O2 permeability, but required a high clamp load, so they went to pry off. I was looking at CO2 permeability, and it is even higher for most polymers. The level of CO2 in beer is fairly high so it takes time for it to diffuse out. The O2 gets in due to the partial pressure of the atmosphere vs. almost none in the bottle.

But tight enough that there's no evaporation?  Interesting.  Maybe I should consider wax for beers I'm storing long term....
I don't know about evaporation. Will look at the levels in the Bigfoot collection in the basement.

3670
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What in the tun this weekend?
« on: March 01, 2014, 06:14:34 AM »
I'm working on a special/best/premium bitter. Trying out First Gold hops for the first time. Anybody use those before?
Think I'll call it Most Premium Bitter.

What else is going on out there?

I Love First Gold. Nice fruitiness and a lot golding spiciness. My best results came with a big addition in the 20-15 min range.

Otherwise, I am brewing a Landbier. Pils, Munich, and a touch of caramunich I. Haven't decided on the hops yet. 833 for the yeast. I believe this to have been the 2nd best beer I have brewed in the past. Looking forward to seeing what the adjustments this time make.
Magnum for bittering and Hallertau Mittlefruh worked well for the one I did last year. That one was yummy, and you can start drinking it on the young side as it makes a nice Kellerbier.

To be on topic, no brewing this weekend, but a lot of cellar work. Next weekend Mrs. R is out of town, it will be warmer, and I want to do my Special American Lager and a Ballantine IPA clone.

3671
It is a brewing Competion, not a recipe competition.

3672
I think the other aspect is that there's fallacy in assuming that a commercial beer, even a classic style example, would automatically win. Condition makes a difference, the commercial beer may not be at peak flavor, and commercial brewers make sacrifices for production reasons that homebrewers don't always have to. It may be a good example and would score well, but it's probably not a perfect example.

This is the reply I was fishing for. If my brew is any hint of what others are brewing, I have no doubt that the best beers are home brewed. Don't misunderstand me, I'm not saying my (fill in the blank) is better that any commercial example. I'm saying that if a moron rookie like me can do what I do, then in a nationwide contest with 700 entries in one class, a decent commercial example would be lucky to get honorable mention.
Read the Commercial Calibration reviews in Zymurgy to see how the high ranking judges rate commercial beers.

3673
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Bigfoot Vertical '95 2003-1014
« on: February 28, 2014, 04:09:14 PM »
Why do you think the older ones are less carbonated?

I can't imagine the caps leak.
Sierra Nevada went to the pry off cap when they found a superior liner material. That material had much less O2 permeability, but required a high clamp load, so they went to pry off. I was looking at CO2 permeability, and it is even higher for most polymers. The level of CO2 in beer is fairly high so it takes time for it to diffuse out. The O2 gets in due to the partial pressure of the atmosphere vs. almost none in the bottle.

3674
The old Schaefer brewery was built for a 4 million bbl. capacity, but probably never made that. I understand it has different equipment today. The old Hudepohl-Schoenling brewery in Cincinnati needed some upgrades when BBC bought it.

It was sad to see the Stroh Brewing Company acquire Schaefer.  As you know, Schaefer was one of the brewing companies that pioneered the style that we refer to today as Classic American Pilsner (one of my favorite styles of beer to brew). National Bohemian (a.k.a. Natty Boh) and Schaefer were the two brews that my father and grandfather usually drank when they drank beer.  Another beer that my father drank from time to time was Schmidt's (William Pflaumer’s desire to avoid paying taxes drove the company that Christian Schmidt built into the ground).  The crazy thing is that all of these old East Coast breweries made products that tasted better than Budweiser.  Well, at least we still have Christian's yeast strain* available to us.

*The Christian Schmidt strain (a.k.a., Seibel Bry 118, Wyeast 2272, and Brewtek CL-630)
The first sip of a CAP I had from Jeff Renner at a club meeting instantly transported me back to the time when I would steal sips of beer when I was a little kid.

I brew a CAP every year. Most are surprised it is made with 6row, corn meal, and cluster hops, finished with a noble hop. I am partial to WLP 833, the Ayinger Strain, but might do a split batch some day with the Schmidt's strain to see how it does. I do remember Schmidt's to be pretty good.

3675
Commercial Beer Reviews / Bigfoot Vertical '95 2003-1014
« on: February 28, 2014, 02:52:06 PM »
This was done a few weeks back. Fun day with plenty of food and drink, along with some friends. This is what I wrote down, and of course there was much talking with friends, eating, and fun, so it was not a full review for each.

For most of us we liked the 09-11 range. A couple like it fresh. One couple are more wine drinkers, and they loved the 95, as it reminded them of a Port wine.



95 Only a small 'pfft' when cap came off. Low/no carbonation, almost still. Figs, raisins, cherries, full of sherry notes. No hop aroma or flavor, low bitterness.

03 Medium low carbonation. Lower oxidation. Some woody oxidation from hops. Slight mustyness. Some sherry.

04 Medium low carbonation, more than 03. Some hop aroma and flavor at low levels. No sherry notes. Bitterness is coming up.

05 Better carbonation. Brilliant color, others were a little murky before. Clean malt flavors. More hop flavor and aroma now. Bitterness lingers a little.

06 Similar to 05, the hops are a little more apparent. More bitterness. Bigfoot territory.

07 Like 06 but the bitterness has gone up more.

08 Big jump in carbonation. Good head formation and retention. Some yeasty esters and fruitiness. Citrus and pine from the hops. Big jump in bitterness. This is much fresher due to the pry off cap and better liner.

09 Really drinking well. Better balance than the 08.

10 Nice hop aroma at lower levels. Clean malt. Balance has gone to bitterness in the finish.

11 About the same as the 10

12 Nice malty aromas, can get the crystal malt. Bitterness hangs in after finish, drying.

13 Some yeast esters. Hops in the aroma, pine and citrus. Hop flavor rolls on the tongue front to back. Hops dominate the malt, you get a little crystal. Bitterness really is there and lingers.

14 A hop bomb, it makes my teeth tingle. Big aroma and flavor of hops.

That was it for the 95 and the 03 vintages. I do have 04 through 14 left, so we can do another some year.


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