Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: 1 ... 244 245 [246] 247 248 ... 571
3676
Beer Recipes / Re: American Mild
« on: August 25, 2014, 01:21:12 AM »
Some thoughts on session beers I have made and looking at Ron Pattinson's book of recipes, I will through this out.

Torrified what will help a little, but not American.
Flaked maize has been in many session beers I make.
Invert sugar has higher sugars, and seems to give a nice flavor and fullness to the beer if the toffee flavors are not overboard.

Most British session beers are in the 149 to 152F range in the mash, but that is for the British Pale ale Malts. The hotter NA malts may work fine at 158-160 and give the desired results.

Thanks for the tips, Jeff.  Isn't using maize or sugar counter to the body that I'm trying so hard to produce?  Maybe I'm going in the wrong direction?  Although I haven't had a lot of milds, many of them seem to be very thin bodied.  I always considered that a flaw.  Am I wrong in that?  I have tried using some candi syrup in a low ABV beer, but other than some flavor from it, I wasn't too thrilled at what it did to the body.

I appreciate your suggestions!

This is something I've been wondering about myself. It seems most recipes I've see for British beers that are written by Brits call for relativly low to middle of the road mash temps. While recipes from US homebrewers seem to go with the upper range.
 I have a book Brew Your Own British Real Ale, by Graham Wheeler. All the mild recipes have a mash temp of 153 and the bitters are all mashed at 151. Many of the recipes also include sugar.
 Of course this could just be a fault with book, but I'm not so sure. It seems to well regarded on the Brit homebrew forums.

The ones I have had in the UK are on handpump or gravity, so there is that difference. Lower attenuating yeast may be another.

I will also say that one of the best Milds/low gravity beers I have had was a Haveys Mild while in Brighton, not so far from the brewery. I could not wrap my head around the flavor and body that was in a 3.0% ABV beer - served on a handpump of course.

3677
The Pub / Re: California Earthquake
« on: August 24, 2014, 07:53:10 PM »
I heard silver oak and some other wineries lost quite a bit of inventory.
Saw pictures on the web of bottles on the floor there.

3678
Hop Growing / Re: 2014 Harvest
« on: August 24, 2014, 07:52:06 PM »
Yeah, around the 48th parallel is great for hops. There are other areas that are know fro hops out of the 48 - 50 range. Soil and climate have an influence. Just saying.

Poperinge Belgium 50.856131, 2.724574
Worcestershire, UK 52.188203, -2.236402 Over half of the British hops come from the West Midlands.
Elbe-Saale DE 51.965237, 11.874112 Where the East Germans grew hops.
Riwaka NZ -41.079932, 172.996874
Crosby hop farm in OR 45.166756, -122.885460 Willamette Valley has a climate similar to the Hallertau
Bushy Park Tasmania AU -42.692972, 146.884307

3679
Hop Growing / Re: 2014 Harvest
« on: August 24, 2014, 05:19:05 PM »
I now pound my dried hops into plugs before sealing and freezing. It certainly reduces the bulk and I'm guessing that the action of a 1" wood dowel driven by a 3 lb sledge probably helps rupture some lupulin glands.

What do you use for your die?

3680
Other Fermentables / Re: Fast mead fermentation
« on: August 24, 2014, 01:16:53 PM »
I've heard Ken Schramm say that with the right nutrients and conditions it shouldn't take more than a week.

That is correct and he says he ferments in the 62-63F range.

This for 71b
Not sure if that was a question or a statement, but that is what he usually uses. So yes and yes.

Was at Moonlight Meadary recently, Michael said the same, 71B at 62-63F.

3681
Other Fermentables / Re: Fast mead fermentation
« on: August 23, 2014, 05:24:40 PM »
I've heard Ken Schramm say that with the right nutrients and conditions it shouldn't take more than a week.

That is correct and he says he ferments in the 62-63F range.

3682
Ingredients / Re: 6-row Maltsters Differences/Preferences
« on: August 23, 2014, 05:23:17 PM »
Both Rahr and Briess also have 6 row, but I only used it once in an American Pre-pro lager and really could not tell any difference.  I also can't recall if it was an American barley or not.  I was told that the 6 row has higher diastatic enzyme action, so it can help convert more adjuncts and has a bit mor of some type of saccharides, but I don't recall the specifics at the moment.  So, give any brand a try on a known recipe and see if you notice the difference from 2 row.  I would like to hear your thoughts.

FWIW, these days 2 row barley has almost identical diastatic power as 6 row.  It is no longer necessary to use 6 row just for added enzymes.
NA 2 row is in the 150-160 lintner range these days. 6 row has gone up to 180 Lintner from what I have read. Those are both so high that there is little difference, so like Denny says, you don't need it for the high enzymatic power anymore.

3683
Ingredients / Re: 6-row Maltsters Differences/Preferences
« on: August 23, 2014, 02:57:44 PM »
I have only found and used Briess 6 row at the LHBSs in my area. Would be nice to try another.

IIRC, about half of the barley grown in the plains is 6 Row. Almost all from the NW is 2 row.

3684
Equipment and Software / Re: ball valve or butterfly valve
« on: August 23, 2014, 12:39:50 AM »
The three piece ball valves that are sold by the likes of Blichmann can be disassembled and cleaned. Hot side I don't worry too much about, cold side (conical) those get more attention.

The commercial brewery that I have done a couple batches at has butterfly valves, those were brushed out, then soaked in acid sanitizer before putting on the fermenter with triclamps. Less places for critters to hide for sure.

3685
I wonder if they could brew and dump before pitching yeast. Would certainly be wasteful.

Maybe an LHBS can team up with a local brewery.
Or brew and let someone take the wort home to pitch. Sort of like the wort giveaways that breweries will sometimes do for homebrewers.
Like IKEA , some assembly required one home.

3686
Beer Recipes / Re: American Mild
« on: August 22, 2014, 06:52:10 PM »
Some thoughts on session beers I have made and looking at Ron Pattinson's book of recipes, I will through this out.

Torrified what will help a little, but not American.
Flaked maize has been in many session beers I make.
Invert sugar has higher sugars, and seems to give a nice flavor and fullness to the beer if the toffee flavors are not overboard.

Most British session beers are in the 149 to 152F range in the mash, but that is for the British Pale ale Malts. The hotter NA malts may work fine at 158-160 and give the desired results.


3687
baby steps, and an improvement.  Congrats!

and... "The National Homebrewers Conference...is expected to draw 4000-5000 attendees in 2015..."

dayum, that's big!
That would be a big increase from 2011 in San Diego, but it will not surprise me if it sets a new record. Many AHA members live on the West Coast, and San Diego is a destination city for more than craft beer (That may be a surprise to some.)

3688
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Membership
« on: August 22, 2014, 03:28:34 PM »
welcome indeed. but don't beleive those other guys, we're all a bunch of bitter vitriolic rednecks.  ;D
Who are you calling a redneck! The other stuff is true.  ;)

3689
Yeah! California here I come (San Diego NHC 2015)! As if there was any doubt.

3690
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Membership
« on: August 22, 2014, 11:47:16 AM »
Welcome to the forum. A good bunch here.

Pages: 1 ... 244 245 [246] 247 248 ... 571