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Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: 1 ... 273 274 [275] 276 277 ... 397
4111
The Pub / Re: Brewery update
« on: February 03, 2012, 06:23:08 AM »
Lots of shiny stuff!  Looks good.

4112
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Woo Hoo.... CYA all in June
« on: February 02, 2012, 10:02:15 AM »
Mike, Philly was announced for 2013 at last years conf.  A long days drive for us, but doable.

4113
Equipment and Software / Re: How's your Thermapen?
« on: February 02, 2012, 06:21:34 AM »
Really like ours.  It is not a year old yet.

4114
Events / Re: AHA Conference Registration Opens Feb 1
« on: February 01, 2012, 04:44:19 PM »
The Rankerts are registered for the conf. 

And hotel.

Plane tickets are next,  might cash in some mile for this.

4115
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing This Weekend - 2/3 Edition
« on: February 01, 2012, 04:31:55 PM »
Munich dunkel if it does not turn to summer.  Who would think the garage might be too warm the first week of Feb.

4116
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First Wort Hopping and 90 minute boil
« on: February 01, 2012, 08:39:23 AM »
This says PU FWH and boils for 2 hours.  A good read if you are doing research into Bo-Pils.

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue5.3/urquell.html

4117
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First Wort Hopping and 90 minute boil
« on: February 01, 2012, 05:43:06 AM »
If you do some research, you will find that is what Pilsner Urquell does.  I, like tygo, have found that it works fine for me to just FWH and boil for 90 min.

4118
Ingredients / Re: Hop Bursting
« on: January 31, 2012, 04:22:39 PM »
I read somewhere that various desired hop oils have flash points (between 100-180 F, I think), so a brief chill down after FO to get the wort temp below 170-180 F was suggested before adding the steeping hops.

I've been doing Hop Stands between 140-170 F for approximately 20-30 minutes.  I think it helps extract hop flavors and aromas, though the aromas are often lost/diluted by the CO2 outgassing during fermentation.  Dry hopping is a good way to get back some of the aromas, but at the cost of grassy flavors and less clarity.
What do you think?  Does the additional steeping time make a difference?

The only hop essential oil that has a flash point over 180F is Caryopholene (SP) at 200F, and this one has spicy charactor like black pepper.  The others are about 78F to 112F, which is why you can get the big aroma from dry hopping, and that is why you want to dry hop at room temperature.  When you rub hops between your hands, you are flashing off some of those oils due to your body temp and friction heat

I made a couple of beers with the last hop addition in the whirlpool for at least 40 minutes, after the wort had been cooled down to 100.  I was expecting more aroma than I got.

Flashpoints for the oils. 

Farnesene = 79F
Myrcene = 104F
Humulene = 110.2°F
Caryophyllene =200F

From here:  http://www.ahaconference.org/wp-content/uploads/presentations/2010/Hop_Quality-James_Altweis.pdf


The oils also are not very soluble, so that is probably why we dryhop for a week or more.

4119
Ingredients / Re: Hop Bursting
« on: January 31, 2012, 01:24:37 PM »
I read somewhere that various desired hop oils have flash points (between 100-180 F, I think), so a brief chill down after FO to get the wort temp below 170-180 F was suggested before adding the steeping hops.

I've been doing Hop Stands between 140-170 F for approximately 20-30 minutes.  I think it helps extract hop flavors and aromas, though the aromas are often lost/diluted by the CO2 outgassing during fermentation.  Dry hopping is a good way to get back some of the aromas, but at the cost of grassy flavors and less clarity.
What do you think?  Does the additional steeping time make a difference?

The only hop essential oil that has a flash point over 180F is Caryopholene (SP) at 200F, and this one has spicy charactor like black pepper.  The others are about 78F to 112F, which is why you can get the big aroma from dry hopping, and that is why you want to dry hop at room temperature.  When you rub hops between your hands, you are flashing off some of those oils due to your body temp and friction heat

4120
The Pub / Re: #58 - Not too shabby!
« on: January 31, 2012, 06:32:18 AM »
else can Miller Lite have all those WBC medals for such a bland beer?

because they go up against other bland beers.

You have it correct, and understand how the beer competitions work.

4121
The Pub / Re: #58 - Not too shabby!
« on: January 30, 2012, 08:07:40 PM »
Like any poll..this one is subjective all the same, but I must admit there are some really fine breweries on the list. There are  a few that didn't make the list, but that's part of the subjectivity. I would like to know the criteria used to make up the list. I wonder if they looked at the total number of GABF medals?

Of course you must know that people who rate and post on those sites think that the GABF and WBC are bogus, as the big breweries buy their medals and/or bribe the judges.  At least that is what some believe in the world of the beer rating sites.  How else can Miller Lite have all those WBC medals for such a bland beer?

4122
The yeast are dropping out.

4123
Kegging and Bottling / Re: gelatin fining in keg
« on: January 30, 2012, 08:58:03 AM »
I don't think you want to boil it, just pasteurize it.  I heat my mixed solution to about 160 and add it to the cold beer in the keg.  It will clear in the time it takes for the hot liquid on top to reach the same temp as the cold beer and then settle to the bottom.  I usually get a glass of gummy stuff and then nice, clear beer.  I don't transfer to another keg unless I need to move it or take it to an event.

+1 This is pretty much what I do.  Works great. Beer is clear after about 8oz of sludgy stuff. BUT it seems like a ot of that sludge clings to the side/bottom of the keg, so be aware that whenever you move or disturb the keg you'll loosen some of it up and get another cloudy glass the next time you pour one.

Red's beer has the most outstanding brilliant clarity of just about any homebrew I have seen.  Going to use his technique in the future to see if I can get that level of clarity.

4124
All Grain Brewing / Re: Can sunlight affect wort?
« on: January 29, 2012, 10:25:02 PM »
Light colored hoppy beers skunk in a minute or 1 in direct sunlight.  It has happened to me, even in the weak Michigan sun.

Riboflavin is the B vitamin required to make the skunking happen, and this is produced by the yest.

Wort in the sun is OK, beer is not.


4125
I drain mine before I put it in, that makes for less water to heat up to get back to a boil.  Saves some time. It takes a couple of seconds to fill it back up when you open the tap.

When I was in Germany working one year, the chiller was left in an unheated shed.  Only worth scrap value when I came home the next year.

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