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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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46
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Belgian breweries low oxygen?
« on: November 16, 2016, 06:50:11 AM »
Really cool.  Still wondering about what was the deal with the wooden beam-looking pieces suspended above the cool ship in the one brewery?
Raw wood to harbor the bugs and critters? You will see raw wood beams in some of the other breweries.

47
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How cold to cold crash?
« on: November 15, 2016, 07:54:23 AM »
I use an Irish moss/carageenan fining agent in the boil, and I use ClarityFerm to eliminate gluten during the fermentation. The latter is also supposed to eliminate chill haze. My homebuilt temperature control system (swamp cooler with thermoelectric chiller and PID loop) can only cool to about 45-50, so I usually cool my carboy down to 50 for 24-48 hours before bottling. That seems to give a very compact yeast cake and clear beer. Is there any advantage for me to go lower?

Crash is the key word here. Take it down as close to zero F as you can.

Zero will freeze the beer, which won't be very helpful!  I shoot for 33.  The freezing point of an average gravity beer is around 29.
Denny is right. To clear lagers quickly at the end of lagering, I go to -1C, or about 30F. Maybe Frankenbrew meant 0C?

48
Equipment and Software / Re: Best way to clean for a dirty Jockey Box?
« on: November 14, 2016, 01:55:19 PM »
Oh yeah: for sure clean the faucets well.

Absolutely

And I order some of that Thonhauser Desana Max.  Thanks for a good suggestion!

I used it, and let it soak, the color had changed. So more went in for a soak, still a color change. I think the 4th time was good to go. In the past I have done one or two Soaks with BLC, so I wonder if that was enough.

49
Beer Recipes / Re: Why Acidulated Malt?
« on: November 14, 2016, 01:50:09 PM »
You might want to use a little acidulated malt to get the mash pH closer to the ~5.3 desired.  Gose tends to be a very pale beer without a ton of specialty malts, so without the acidulated, your mash pH might be high at like 5.8-6.0, so you'll likely find that a little acidulated malt is a great idea for pH control, even more than it is for flavor contribution.  Otherwise I'd agree, a bit of lactic acid added after the mash is done would be okay to add the desired tartness in flavor.  Or better yet, go the route of a sour mash or partial sour Lacto fermentation or whatever, and don't add any acid at all.

Anyway........ the one authentic imported gose from Germany that I tasted was not very tart or salty at all.  It was more like a witbier than anything else.  I get the feeling that everyone in America just loves to overdo everything.  So, consider whether maybe you don't need to bother with anything too fancy, yet it might turn out even more authentic in the end.

There is a specialty bottle shop in Regensburg, Germany. We had a very nice Gose there, the salt is light, not over the top. The owner said he had a Westbrook Gose, and it was like drinking sea water.

50
Equipment and Software / Re: Best way to clean for a dirty Jockey Box?
« on: November 14, 2016, 07:08:37 AM »
I'd flush for about 5 minutes with hot water, flush for about 5 minutes with BLC, soak for about 15 minutes with fresh BLC, and then flush again with more hot water. BLC is caustic, so it shouldn't take too much.

If you are worried, there is that color indicating cleaner. Changes color when there are soils in the lines.
I got a pack of the Thonhauser Desana Max at an local event and used it. Liked it enough to go buy 3 more for future use.

Steve, you might want to also take the taps apart and clean the the parts well with a brush.

51
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Belgian breweries low oxygen?
« on: November 14, 2016, 06:58:04 AM »
BTW, it is of course very well possible the the monks at Rochefort preboil their water, which, straight from the well  (I first wrote hell) has 245 ppm bicarbonate. That would make at least the first step lodo.
They could use slaked lime, or acid (no RHG)to neutralize the bicarbonate, or RO to remove the minerals. Hard to say from the pictures, no water treatment was evident.

52
The Pub / Re: Whole Foods
« on: November 12, 2016, 08:03:55 PM »
The way I've always tried to think about it is this:

Chimay - the most consistent, the biggest and somewhat bland (very relatively speaking here in terms of Trappists). I know exactly what I am going to get every time I crack one. Note that when I say "bland" I typically mean a suppression of some of the characteristic esters and phenols from the Belgian yeasts.

I love them. Here I am sipping a Premiere:



Westmalle - very, very consistent as well on account of being the second largest after Chimay. The Dubbel is incredible with a fair bit of age on it. The Tripel speaks for itself. I enjoy the 750 ml bottles.

Rochefort - very tough to classify with any certainty. There seems to be a consistent characteristic phenolic character that I don't enjoy all that much. It's been stated that fast fermentation is the cause but I can't say for sure. Rochefort seems to be the least consistent of the "big 3" (Westmalle, Chimay, Rochefort) but is the most glorious when presented with a prime example. As much as I enjoy Westmalle, a prime Rochefort 8 is the most incredible of all the Trappist beers.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Rochefort is not big. ~18,000 bbls year. Much smaller than Chimay or Westmalle. Königshaven is the biggest.

I didn't mean size. They are just the most popular and well known of the Trappists. That's why I used the quotation marks. Orval is definitely bigger than Rochefort as well.
Big 5 then?

53
The Pub / Re: Whole Foods
« on: November 12, 2016, 07:26:46 PM »
The way I've always tried to think about it is this:

Chimay - the most consistent, the biggest and somewhat bland (very relatively speaking here in terms of Trappists). I know exactly what I am going to get every time I crack one. Note that when I say "bland" I typically mean a suppression of some of the characteristic esters and phenols from the Belgian yeasts.

I love them. Here I am sipping a Premiere:



Westmalle - very, very consistent as well on account of being the second largest after Chimay. The Dubbel is incredible with a fair bit of age on it. The Tripel speaks for itself. I enjoy the 750 ml bottles.

Rochefort - very tough to classify with any certainty. There seems to be a consistent characteristic phenolic character that I don't enjoy all that much. It's been stated that fast fermentation is the cause but I can't say for sure. Rochefort seems to be the least consistent of the "big 3" (Westmalle, Chimay, Rochefort) but is the most glorious when presented with a prime example. As much as I enjoy Westmalle, a prime Rochefort 8 is the most incredible of all the Trappist beers.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Rochefort is not big. ~18,000 bbls year. Much smaller than Chimay or Westmalle. Königshaven is the biggest.

54
Ingredients / Re: complimentary hops with Ekuanot
« on: November 11, 2016, 06:13:58 AM »
Not sure what the deal is with the name but my first batch with these hops is finishing carbing. I went 2:1 equinox to simcoe at flame out and dry hop. Realizing the impact of simcoe, I am getting a ton of pineapple, mango, and possibly papaya in the aroma and flavor. Very surprised by the amount of tropical fruit. A lot less citrus and pine than I was expecting at this point.
The name? Trademark dispute?

One ounce of HBC-366 is all you need to make 5 gallons of English Summer Ale, and it is a very nice beer.

55
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Finally decided to post
« on: November 11, 2016, 06:05:39 AM »
Hello Chris. Welcome aboard.

56
All Grain Brewing / Re: To rest or not to rest, that is the question.
« on: November 11, 2016, 06:02:16 AM »
If you start with RO you would be better off until you get your source water dialed in.  That is what I have been told at least so that's what I do?

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk
Thank you sir. I'm definately going to start doing something about the water. I can get 5 gal of RO for $2.50. I'll have to read up on RO water and see what's stripped and what's left behind by reverse osmosis.

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk
A well maintained RO system takes out 99% of the minerals. You will have some left, but pretty much of no concern. A cheap TDS meter will tell you if your source is working properly.

57
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Taxman Anyone?
« on: November 10, 2016, 06:24:31 PM »
Well, are you a Hoosier? We were in Bloomington IN for Monday and Tuesday with 2 other couples. The ladies were back on campus after 40 years. Yeah we were old farts. Saw some Taxman at one or two bars, there or Indy.

58
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing sugar
« on: November 09, 2016, 05:51:27 AM »
Do you have the option of adding DME, LME or honey? I'm not a fan of adding simple sugar to increase alcohol.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Why not?
I prefer the flavor and complexity of LME, DME and honey added after 2/3 of the fermentation is completed. I've used sugar in the past and gotten cidery flavors that I don't care for. Just my opinion.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

I have used sugar dozens of times, maybe a hundred, and never gotten cidery flavors from it.
+1 No ciders flavors with enough viable yeast, up to 20% sugar.

59
Beer Recipes / Re: LODO American Blonde
« on: November 09, 2016, 05:42:48 AM »
Oh I'd say Rochefort is pretty large, especially if we're getting their beer over here en masse. Which reminds me, I have a bottle of Rochefort 10 in the fridge...mmmmm might have to drink that tonight. Election night! Which heaping pile will it be!!!
If you consider 18,000 hL/ a year large. That is ~15,000 bbl/year. The brewery does not look large from the other side of the gate.

60
All Grain Brewing / Re: Boil over: foam is good or not?
« on: November 09, 2016, 05:37:56 AM »
A little cold break is beneficial to yeast health.

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