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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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61
Equipment and Software / Re: Custom immersion chiller questions
« on: December 28, 2016, 08:00:15 AM »
It is 20 inches high and about 10 inches in diameter.
1/2 inch tube?

62
Equipment and Software / Re: Custom immersion chiller questions
« on: December 28, 2016, 05:37:02 AM »
Try soaking it in vinegar (the distilled stuff you get at the grocery store).

How big is that, hard to to tell from the picture.

63
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing Science vs. Citizen Science
« on: December 27, 2016, 08:52:28 PM »
I was wondering if anyone here knows the percentage of Pro Breweries in the US that are LODO? Also, what breweries in particular that use these techniques?

By volume of market share over 70% of beer sold in the US is likely LODO.

EDIT:  Is it safe to say breweries using a BrauKon system are LODO?  If so, dozens of breweries.

Great observation. Krones as well. That means Hill Farmstead, Troegs, Uinta, Victory, allagash, etc.

sooooo. 6 microbreweries might be LODO?

Those are a few I can think of off the top of my head. Mainly BrauKon users. I'd have to search and see whose using Krones.

We are just having a discussion.

So why are BrauKon equipped breweries LODO?

Sierra Nevada has the columns to deaerate the water for the brewery, and a tank on the order of 1000 bbls to store it. They use it throughout the brewery, including for wet milling under N2, then the slurry goes to the mash kettle, filling from the bottom (under N2?). They have a GEA Huppmann brewhouse.

I toured the largest brewery in MI last Wed. They wet mill and have a modern 200 bbl. GEA Huppmann brewhouse. They just use Deareated water to push beer, not to supply the wet mill.

I am just pointing out that the water treatment is up stream, and next time I am in a brewery with the column strippers, I will see if I can see A manufactures tag. It is probably optional as to if you have DA water or not.

The MI brewery has a new Krones bottling line, and a fairly new KHS canning line.

I certainly respect Sierra Nevada, but if that's what LoDO tastes like, I'm not blown away.

Sierra Nevada does do some pretty good German styles. They did win a Gold at WBC 2010 for a Pilsner, which had a delicate malt flavor, balanced with the hops. That one would hit the target for LODO.

64
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing Science vs. Citizen Science
« on: December 27, 2016, 08:28:09 PM »
I was wondering if anyone here knows the percentage of Pro Breweries in the US that are LODO? Also, what breweries in particular that use these techniques?

By volume of market share over 70% of beer sold in the US is likely LODO.

EDIT:  Is it safe to say breweries using a BrauKon system are LODO?  If so, dozens of breweries.

Great observation. Krones as well. That means Hill Farmstead, Troegs, Uinta, Victory, allagash, etc.

sooooo. 6 microbreweries might be LODO?

Those are a few I can think of off the top of my head. Mainly BrauKon users. I'd have to search and see whose using Krones.

We are just having a discussion.

So why are BrauKon equipped breweries LODO?

Sierra Nevada has the columns to deaerate the water for the brewery, and a tank on the order of 1000 bbls to store it. They use it throughout the brewery, including for wet milling under N2, then the slurry goes to the mash kettle, filling from the bottom (under N2?). They have a GEA Huppmann brewhouse.

I toured the largest brewery in MI last Wed. They wet mill and have a modern 200 bbl. GEA Huppmann brewhouse. They just use Deareated water to push beer, not to supply the wet mill.

I am just pointing out that the water treatment is up stream, and next time I am in a brewery with the column strippers, I will see if I can see A manufactures tag. It is probably optional as to if you have DA water or not.

The MI brewery has a new Krones bottling line, and a fairly new KHS canning line.



65
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing Science vs. Citizen Science
« on: December 27, 2016, 08:13:49 PM »
I was wondering if anyone here knows the percentage of Pro Breweries in the US that are LODO? Also, what breweries in particular that use these techniques?
That question could be turned around to ask the percentage of breweries in Germany that are LODO?

Big ones yes, modern regional ones yes, especially if they are mainly Helles producers. Older regional ones no. Small family breweries, no.

66
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast January - March PCs
« on: December 24, 2016, 07:25:53 AM »
Derailed that thread.

Sorry.

67
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast January - March PCs
« on: December 23, 2016, 07:37:47 PM »
I'm interested in what you would have picked.

1882 and 1768

and 1026.  Sorry, I thought they were in my previous post!

Good to see ya, Sac!
Yeah, glad to see he is watching over us yeast sinners.

The Dude abides. "Lebowski" reference.




68
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: RO Water
« on: December 23, 2016, 07:32:53 PM »
If you want a dry Pilsner, get the SO4 around 75-100 ppm and the Cl less than the SO4.

69
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast January - March PCs
« on: December 23, 2016, 09:58:24 AM »
I'm interested in what you would have picked.

1882 and 1768
He lives! He breathes!

Which yeasts are those? And are they good top croppers?

I think 1768 is the Young's yeast.

70
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: low oxygen trappist
« on: December 23, 2016, 09:53:09 AM »
To get the right ester profile in a British ale, I don't make a starter, and don't use O2, just pump full throttle into the fermenter. When I pitched according to the yeast calculators with a starter, and aerated with O2, the beers were too clean.

71
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 02:01:56 PM »
I have done a Dunkel using the yeast method, that was back in early August. It suffered from a few hiccups on brewday, and was a little gritty for a while. It is drinking really nice now.

After a trip to Germany, touring breweries, and talking to guides and one brewer, I came back thinking it is time to try more. I have a Pils in kegs now, and did a Heller Bock yesterday. I have a SS chiller that I use to drop boiling water down to strike temps. The strike water is underlet to the grist, something I used to do. No splashing. Cap with foil. The kettle is filled from the bottom. I have used some Brewtan-B in the last 2 beers. Wort has been super clear, break is way beyond egg drop soup.

As these are lagered and spunded, I will report back on taste.

On deck would be another Dunkel and a Tmavey Pivo. Then maybe a Helles?

Between the last couple of lagers I did a couple of historic IPAs. A British IPA and a Ballantine IPA knockoff. I used plenty of copper in the process, didn't splash, but these beers were aged in wood, and some oxidation was probably part of the flavor profile. The British also got some Oak and Brett-C (the Brett migh consume a lot of O2 in aging).

Mentioned all of that as I can convince myself to try new techniques, but I also am interested in old brewing styles and practices. I love the hobby, I am an engineer so I like science, and I get to combine a little history too.

72
Ingredients / Re: Sorachi Ace
« on: December 21, 2016, 07:48:14 AM »
It goes well in a Belgian Pale Ale type of thing. A friend has it on tap often.

Heavy usage and it comes across like lemon pledge.

73
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 20, 2016, 02:22:00 PM »
I read the last 4 pages or so, as I was brewing a Heller Bock.  ;)

some comments.

Breweries that have QC/QA Labs with all of the analytical tools also have tasting panels. The Go/NoGo for the beer is the tasting panel. Bamforth has written how humans are >10 times as sensitive as the lab equipment.

Touring Bräuerie Schönram, the old gent leading our group had to be the retired brewer. When we in the fermentation area, he talked of how they use open fermentaion and skim the Braunhefe off of the Krauesen. He referenced a Weihenstephan study when they skimmed one beer and not the other. The beers were the same analytically as measured in the lab. The beer that had the Braunhefe removed was preferred by the tasters.

74
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Newbie here. Water question.
« on: December 19, 2016, 09:42:30 AM »
Yep, that's pretty good advice if you don't have a water report.  If you have soft water, though, no need for distilled or RO water.

This summer, one of our local water treatment plants went down for repairs.  This is my source of water, surface water collected along the Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains. My municipal water was replaced with treated Missouri River water.  Wretched stuff, one of its sources is geothermal water from Yellowstone that has all sorts of nasty crap dissolved in it. I had to make trips to get spring water in order to brew this summer.
If the Op lives in the PNW, Western NC, parts of the Eastern seaboard, and so on, then "soft" water would work. Soft water means low Ca and Mg. Bicarbonate is usually low if the water is soft.

The water from my ion exchange softener has low Ca and Mg, but high Na and bicarbonate.

75
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Newbie here. Water question.
« on: December 18, 2016, 08:39:18 PM »
Uh, guys, I think you lost me  : (
With extract use Reverse Osmosis or Distilled water for balanced beers. Add 1 tsp of gypsum for hoppy beers, or 1 tsp of Calcium Chloride for Malty beers. If it is too much decrease for the next batch.

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