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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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8746
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Too much pressure stalls fermentation?
« on: July 15, 2010, 05:04:46 PM »
The pressure for the blowoff tube set up is negligable.  Yeast will ferment at higher pressure.  Think about a 400 or 800 barrel conical/cylindrical fermenter, where the yeast can have several stories of beer causing pressure on it.

Or there are yeasts that work well under 1 ATM of pressure. 
http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/strains_wlp925.html

Next time press down around the lid, when bubbles start in the blowoff air lock, you have found the leak.

8747
Ingredients / Re: IPA that emphasizes Citrus flavor/aroma
« on: July 15, 2010, 12:38:04 PM »

I also agree on pulling the Melanoidin. Another thing you can try is cooling your wort down to 190 ish before throwing in your knockout hop addition. I find that it keeps a little more of the aroma around at those temps then right at 212.

You are correct.  Caryophyllene has a flash point of 200F, so adding the hops at 190F keeps this oil in the beer.

8748
Beer Recipes / Re: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone
« on: July 14, 2010, 04:59:00 PM »
Sierra Nevada uses 60L crystal malt, same as caramel.

The hops have changed over time.  You might leave out the carapils in this one, and up the crystal.

http://beerdujour.com/Recipes/ChrisFrey/Nearly_Nirvana_-_the_Original_Big_Brew_2000_Recipe.html

vs today where they use some Magnum for bittering along with the perle.

http://www.sierranevada.com/beers/paleale.html

8749
Ingredients / Re: Chloramine removal and Hetch-Hetchy water
« on: July 13, 2010, 10:41:12 PM »
AJ deLange says one Campden tablet will remove the chlorine/chloramine from 20 gallons of water.  The reaction is fast, and done very quickly.  If AJ says this, it is good enough for me. 

8750
Ingredients / Re: Home-Smoked Malt
« on: July 12, 2010, 02:17:31 PM »
I smoked 4 lbs on Friday.

You did three bags!   :o

You like smoked beer, I think.

8751
All Things Food / Re: Beer Can Chicken
« on: July 09, 2010, 05:02:16 PM »
Fred, you should see Mike O'Brien's beer can chicken BrewGyver barbeque stand gizmos.  I think he can get 4 chickens on each stand, and he has several stands for his BBQ trailer.  Oh yeah - they are made of Stainless Steel.


8752
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 showing almost empty
« on: July 08, 2010, 12:30:38 PM »
The gauge will read less when the tank is cold.  Set it in a room temp place and it will go up.

To check if it has CO2, the tare weight should be on the tank, so weigh it without the gages.  The weight-tare=CO2 weight.

8754
Ingredients / Re: Wavelengths of light that lead to skunking?
« on: July 06, 2010, 12:35:12 PM »
Once I ran acoss a paper on line that had the amount of light passed vs. wavelength for different colored bottles, and I think it had the input spectra from several light sources.  Too bad I did not bookmark it.

Flourescents do have spikes in the visible spectum.  They can also have UV, i.e. blacklight.

8755
Beer Recipes / Re: Bell's Two Hearted Ale clone
« on: July 02, 2010, 04:27:03 PM »
Jeff is right, Oberon and Amber = 5.8%.  The pale ale is 5.2%.

There was some debate in out club if Bells is now using a bottling yeast strain vs. the house fermentation strain.  I have done a clone that was very close about 6 to 8 years ago.  They moved into the Galesburg facility in 2006, and may have gone to a bottling stain then.  Fred claims to have heard this directly from Larry at the AHA rally.   

8756
Ingredients / Re: Wavelengths of light that lead to skunking?
« on: July 02, 2010, 01:33:05 PM »
Skunking is caused by wavelengths in the 450 - 700 nm range.

Sunlight and fluorescent bulbs have light in this range.  Even incandescent has some.

You want to get lights that have wavelengths that are in the yellow to red range, and don't have componenets in the indigo to green range.


8757
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Wyeast 1762 or 3787
« on: June 30, 2010, 03:34:07 PM »
It depends on what you want the beer to be.

3787 is the Westmalle strain (also used by Westverleteren and Achel).  This is the one I use for Tripels as Westmalle Tripel is one of my all time favorites.  3787 is recommended for Tripels by Wyeast.
http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_styledetails.cfm?ID=187

1762 is the Rochefort strain.  Better for a Strong Dark Ale.
http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_styledetails.cfm?ID=189

But you could always give 1762 a shot in a Tripel.

Pitch at about 65F and let it ramp up.


8758
In the bizarro world of the state of Michigan we have a different situation.

Our State Fair, longest running in the nation, has been canceled due to lack of funding.  You may have heard our economy is a little below average.

The State Fair Homebrew Competition lives on with a new name.  At over 700 entries, it was too big to fail!
http://www.mlive.com/kalamabrew/index.ssf/2010/06/a_new_homebrewing_competition.html

8759
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cascadia Dark Ale (Black IPA)
« on: June 29, 2010, 11:48:05 AM »
    Does anyone have any ideas for the dark grains so that it doesn't get astringent from the lower attenuation?
 

I don't know how you get astringency from low attenuation.  Can you explain that thought to me?

Cold steeping is a way to avoid astringency with dark malts.  Crush the malts fine.  Then soak overnight in de-chlorinated water, and I use about 2 qts water/ lb grain.  Add the filtered liquid to the boil, or add the whole black mess to the mash during the last 5 minutes, or even during the sparge.  If you do this with Carafa II you can get a really nice chocolate flavor (Weyermanns calls the Carafa series chocolate malts on their web site).
I'm guessing you mean crush the malts to what ever you have your mill's rollers set at, as you would on a regular crush?  Another question, should the CDA be opaque black, jet black or just borderline black?  So it seems as the malts do contribute chocolate flavors when cold steeped, is this okay in a Black IPA?  I thought the Black IPA was supposed to taste like a regular American IPA with only the color changing?
 
I have fixed rollers, but pass the dark malts through twice for this.  You could also use a coffee grinder.

8760
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cascadia Dark Ale (Black IPA)
« on: June 28, 2010, 07:39:09 PM »
    Does anyone have any ideas for the dark grains so that it doesn't get astringent from the lower attenuation?
 

I don't know how you get astringency from low attenuation.  Can you explain that thought to me?

Cold steeping is a way to avoid astringency with dark malts.  Crush the malts fine.  Then soak overnight in de-chlorinated water, and I use about 2 qts water/ lb grain.  Add the filtered liquid to the boil, or add the whole black mess to the mash during the last 5 minutes, or even during the sparge.  If you do this with Carafa II you can get a really nice chocolate flavor (Weyermanns calls the Carafa series chocolate malts on their web site).

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