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Messages - In The Sand

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31
The Pub / Re: Thank you microbreweries...
« on: February 01, 2014, 06:51:20 PM »
Thank you microbreweries for making my alcoholism seem sophisticated.

32
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Five pound CO2 tank fill -- what is full?
« on: February 01, 2014, 11:13:01 AM »
What temp is your bottle at? Pressure is a function of temperature so if the bottle is cold it will read lower, but it still has the same amount of CO2. If you store it inside the fridge with the kegs it will look low.

Alternatively, you may have a leak. Get some star San in a spray bottle and see if you can find it.

33
Yeast and Fermentation / How long to leave stir plate on
« on: February 01, 2014, 07:26:27 AM »
This may be a stupid question but I read something somewhere that has me questioning my process. How long should the stir plate stay on when you're making a starter? Throughout the entire fermentation, or turn off when active fermentation starts?

34
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Whirlpool Conundrum - my first post! :)
« on: January 30, 2014, 06:05:49 AM »
By the way, I use whirlfloc at 10 min left in the boil. This'll give you clear beer as long as all your other processes are good.

35
Is this really a 3 yr old thread? Somebody must be snowed in and bored...

36
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Over pitching
« on: January 30, 2014, 05:49:48 AM »

Interesting you mention double or triple....a few 1 gallon batches I've done instruct you to use half a pack of dry yeast (meant for a 5 gallon batch). In my mind, that would be enough yeast for a 2.5 gallon batch and I'm most likely using almost 3x more yeast.
Additionally, these one gallons are taking longer to ferment out fully and I've had some issues with acetaldehyde that I think may have to do with pulling off the yeast in 2 weeks vs. waiting longer.

Use a yeast pitching calculator. I use mrmalty.com but there are others available. Then you'll see how difficult it is to over pitch (or even pitch the appropriate amount of yeast).  IME it's extremely hard to over pitch.

37
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Whirlpool Conundrum - my first post! :)
« on: January 29, 2014, 08:55:17 AM »
I have a plate chiller and pump. Usually we stir for a few minutes at KO to get a good whirlpool then cover the kettle. I have a homemade version of a hop stopper that works fine for keeping pellet hops and hot break material out of the chiller. I always backflush (hook the pump up backwards through the chiller with some oxyclean) immediately after racking. I've never had any clogging or infections with this method. Don't overthink it.

38
Equipment and Software / Thinking ahead (way ahead)
« on: January 28, 2014, 05:24:37 AM »
I live in Florida too. If you have room for it, why not get another fridge? I have 4 in my garage and didn't pay a dime for any of them. Seems older refrigerators are easy to come by (especially when you're not looking too hard).

Then spend $90 on a Ranco digital temperature controller and you've got it. Otherwise in the hot summer months you're going to struggle to keep your ales at good temps, even with a swamp cooler.

39
Beer Recipes / Re: Which Cocoa Powder for a Mocha Stout
« on: January 27, 2014, 06:53:03 AM »

How would I determine the gravity contribution from cocoa powder?  I added 4 oz.

it has none. or at least none to speak of. whatever sugars are present will have an effect but 4 oz in 5 gallons is tiny even if it's pure sugar. 4 oz is about what I use to carb a 5 gallon batch. in 5 gallons of water it would result in a gravity ~ 1.002. given that your cocoa mix is mostly, or at least partially cocoa powder it will be less than that and you would not be able to measure it.

Since I did a 10-gal batch it'd be even more minuscule then I guess. I did end up using the Nesquik and it was noticeable in the wort. Quite tasty!

40
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: White labs vial production date?
« on: January 26, 2014, 06:29:04 AM »

Howdy,

how do i determine the production date for a vial of white labs?  The experiation date on this parituclate vial is 5/14/14

Cheers,
Jeff

I believe it's 4 months prior to the posted best by date

Yes

41
Beer Recipes / Re: Which Cocoa Powder for a Mocha Stout
« on: January 24, 2014, 03:21:39 PM »
How would I determine the gravity contribution from cocoa powder?  I added 4 oz.

42
Beer Recipes / Re: Which Cocoa Powder for a Mocha Stout
« on: January 24, 2014, 09:20:03 AM »
Nesquik is mostly sugar. According to the nutrition info, 13g of each 16g serving is sugar (that's 81%). Most of the other ingredients you don't need in beer either, but nothing that will hurt fermentation.  The sugar means you'll have to add at least 5 times more nesquik by weight to get the same chocolate flavor. Also, the chocolate flavor is from - cocoa powder.

Looking at the sugars in the Nesquik, it says they are maltodextrin and sucralose, meaning unfermentable (mostly) sugars.  So I should retain sweetness from the Nesquik, right?  Next time I may try something different, as mentioned, like baker's chocolate or Ghiridelli(sp) but can't get to the store right now.  Thanks for the help.  I will let you all know what I ended up doing and how it turns out.

43
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Full Sail Berliner Weiss
« on: January 24, 2014, 06:29:28 AM »
I've been looking for a good BW to see if I like the style to add to my repertoire. I tried the New Belgium Yuzo Imperial BW. Not a good representation of the style. Imperial and Berliner Weisse shouldn't be used in the same sentence.

44
Beer Recipes / Re: Which Cocoa Powder for a Mocha Stout
« on: January 23, 2014, 06:40:42 PM »

Nesquik is mostly sugar. According to the nutrition info, 13g of each 16g serving is sugar (that's 81%). Most of the other ingredients you don't need in beer either, but nothing that will hurt fermentation.  The sugar means you'll have to add at least 5 times more nesquik by weight to get the same chocolate flavor. Also, the chocolate flavor is from - cocoa powder. So I'd stick with the unsweetened cocoa powder, which is entirely cocoa.
You can add cocoa powder at the end of the boil. It will turn into sludge in the bottom of your kettle. Bad news if you use a counterflow chiller or have any sort of screen in the kettle.
Are you adding any coffee? I'd add 1 or 2 ounces of whole coffee beans after primary fermentation for subtle coffee flavor.

That explains why the last time a buddy and I used 4 oz cocoa powder at the end of the boil I had a clog. I use a hop stopper and a plate chiller.

Would it then be better to add after primary has finished when I add the cacao nibs?

45
Beer Recipes / Which Cocoa Powder for a Mocha Stout
« on: January 23, 2014, 05:42:07 PM »
Want to brew a mocha stout.  Not planning on adding any lactose, so maybe I can't really call it a mocha stout.  I plan on adding cocoa powder to the end of the boil and cacao nibs after primary is finished.  I bought two types of cocoa powder:  Nestle Nesquik and Hershey's Natural Unsweetened Cocoa.  This is a 10-gal batch that I could try each if I wasn't adding it to the boil.  I'm using about 3.5% each of roasted barley and chocolate malt.  I'm also using 2 lbs of oats.  Yeast of choice is a 2 L starter with WLP004.  Any ideas as to how I could get a sweet chocolate taste balance with a roasted coffee-like flavor, but keeping the chocolate as the dominant flavor?  Is there anything wrong with using Nesquik?  Maybe some preservatives that will inhibit fermentation?

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