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Messages - In The Sand

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76
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Starting to bottle only
« on: December 25, 2013, 06:26:48 AM »
Why cold crash if you're bottle conditioning? I've never bottled before but if I did I think I'd just ferment out and then bottle, leaving enough yeast in suspension to eat up the priming sugar. If you're worried about clarity, won't the yeast just settle out in the bottom of the bottles when you put them in the fridge?

As far as doing it without oxidation, you've seen the way I keg. Why not bottle the same way with a CO2 push (unless you already sold your CO2 bottle). I use a ported carboy cap with a small pickup tube going down into the carboy, a tube going out, and another tube going in the second port on the cap pushing CO2. Then just have someone capping them for you, or add a racking cane with a check valve so you can stop the flow when you need to. You'll just have to push at a low enough pressure to be able to stop it when you need to. I vote for having somebody come from the other side of town to help you cap. Just wish I could think of someone ;)

77
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 24, 2013, 09:44:33 AM »
http://thebrewingnetwork.com/shows/984

Give this a listen. According to Palmer, a thin layer of white on top of washed yeast is yeast hulls. The healthy yeast is between that and trub at the bottom.

Thanks Jim!  Good link.  So according to Jamil, he decants the real light layer of yeast hulls and proteins before pitching.  So I have quite a bit of good yeast it looks like.  I'll probably split it up to smaller aliquots for future batches.

78
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 24, 2013, 08:02:09 AM »

Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

How long the slurry is 'good' without a starter is based on volume and viability. You can wait 3-4 weeks as long as you have enough slurry.

I usually take the Mr. Malty calcs as gospel when it comes to slurry age/viability, even if they are a bit conservative.

Personally, if its been longer than a week, I'll make a small starter to boost viability and reduce lag/cleanup time, especially if its a finicky yeast or a lightly flavored beer (Kolsch, helles, Pils, etc).

So if it's a week from when I harvested and it's a WLP001 slurry going from a pale ale to a heavily hopped IPA, chances are it's perfect for the job?

79
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 24, 2013, 08:00:15 AM »
Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

Holy crap! That's only about 50-75 ml of yeast.  To do a 1.060 beer Mr. Malty says I need about 250 ml.  So do I just pitch 250 ml of everything that's in the jar?

Mr. Malty says you need 250ml of yeast slurry, not yeast.  You have separated the yeast from the slurry.  If you did a decent job washing you have plenty of yeast for a 1.060 beer.

Dave

Excellent clarification.  Thanks Dave!

80
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 24, 2013, 07:13:00 AM »
It's hard to tell from the picture but I think that middle layer is yeast and the rest is just trub material. The volume of trub you got in the jar indicates you didn't decant enough steps and/or you did not let it settle long enough before decanting.

When you do that rinse process it's all about temperature and time. The warmer the trub/water mix the longer it takes for the junk you don't want to drop out. You need to let it sit long enough that the stuff you don't want drops out but the yeast hasn't started to settle out. The more trub you start with the longer you need to rest before you decant the liquid to another container but generally you should be resting around 15-20 minutes the first time or two before you move the liquid into its final destination.

After the rinsing process I transferred it from a 6-gal carboy to a one gallon glass jar.  I let it settle and stratify for about an hour.  The jars I used were sanitized in boiling water the night before, so the water wasn't warm.  The water and yeast/trub were about the same temperature (65-70F).

After the one gallon glass jar settled for about another hour, I transferred to the one quart jar in the picture.  Then I put that in the fridge because I didn't see anymore obvious trub at that time.  So what is in the picture has been crashing for about 84 hrs.

81
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 24, 2013, 07:06:53 AM »
Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

Holy crap! That's only about 50-75 ml of yeast.  To do a 1.060 beer Mr. Malty says I need about 250 ml.  So do I just pitch 250 ml of everything that's in the jar?


82
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 23, 2013, 06:34:40 PM »

How did you harvest? Swirl and pour? Or did you wash it?

I swirl and pour. I also don't do a starter if my harvest is fairly fresh. I decant the beer and pitch a cup to a cup and a half of the harvest. (Amount depending on OG or Lager)

When I restart I only use about 100 ml of the harvest in a 2000ml stir start

I rinsed it then transferred to one gallon container. Decanted beer then transferred yeast off trub to one quart container. Put in fridge. I thought people always make starters with harvested yeast. Especially if you want it to go farther. But I don't know that's why I'm asking the questions.

83
Yeast and Fermentation / Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 23, 2013, 04:50:28 PM »
Harvested this wlp 001 from a pale ale last Friday. This is my first time and I'm about to use it to make a starter for an IPA I'm doing Friday. In this picture, you will see a very small light colored layer between the beer and the darker yeast(?) layer at the bottom. Is this light layer the only viable yeast from what I harvested?

84
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 002 Starter Looks Funny
« on: December 20, 2013, 09:51:31 AM »
I am not crashing this starter before I pitch, but when I do pitch should I decant most of the wort and just pitch the floc'd yeast?

85
Equipment and Software / Re: Floaties in Sani-clean
« on: December 19, 2013, 05:31:55 AM »
+1 on distilled water

86
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 002 Starter Looks Funny
« on: December 18, 2013, 07:47:11 PM »

I think he is talking about taking the vials out of the fridge.

Yes

87
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 002 Starter Looks Funny
« on: December 18, 2013, 06:43:12 PM »

Ummm . . . I'm a little confused/concerned with your procedure.
Made a 2 L starter with two vials of WLP 002 last night.  Directions say to take it out of the fridge 3-6 hrs prior to pitching.  I took it out about 1 hr before pitching.  It has been on a stir plate since then.
You made a starter with 2 vials of WLP002 and put it in the fridge, then pulled it out today and put it on a stir plate?  And it stayed on there for one hour before you put it in your wort?

That's the way I'm reading this. :-\

LOL No. When I got the yeast I put it in the fridge. Prior to making the starter, I took the yeast out of the fridge and it sat on the counter for an hour before I finished the starter wort and got it chilled. Then I pitched the yeast into the starter wort. Then I put it on the stir plate. Then you have the pic I posted. Got it? :)

88
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 002 Starter Looks Funny
« on: December 18, 2013, 10:42:22 AM »
That's great to hear. I have the stir plate wide open which is why it is in suspension.

89
Yeast and Fermentation / WLP 002 Starter Looks Funny
« on: December 17, 2013, 07:54:09 PM »
Made a 2 L starter with two vials of WLP 002 last night.  Directions say to take it out of the fridge 3-6 hrs prior to pitching.  I took it out about 1 hr before pitching.  It has been on a stir plate since then.  Today it looks very chunky.  Looks like the yeast is congealed(?).  Anybody ever had this happen?  Did I shock the yeast, or does it just need time to break up?  The wort was about 75F when I pitched and the yeast was probably around 65F.  Here's a pic:


90
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Puree vs. Autolysis
« on: October 22, 2013, 05:21:37 AM »
Our OG was 1.073.  I decided to make a starter using one pack of 1056.  I made about a 1600 ml starter, but tasted the beer before pitching the starter to see if some fermentation really did take place.  The beer was very raspberry forward.  As far as I could tell, none of the added sugar had been cleaned up.  So I decided to pitch the starter.  It's been about 36 hrs now and I haven't noticed any visible fermentation in the carboys, but I will wait.

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