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Messages - In The Sand

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91
Yeast and Fermentation / Puree vs. Autolysis
« on: October 17, 2013, 06:36:51 AM »
A buddy and I brewed a 10-gal split batch of cocoa/cayenne/raspberry stout on 9/20.  I used two packets of US-05 in my fermentor and he used a Wyeast 1084 starter in his.  We had some trouble finding the raspberries we wanted and it took a bit longer to add them to the fermentors than expected.  So on 10/14 I added the raspberries (at about 67*F).  The SG before adding the raspberries was in the 1.020 range.  Now about 60 hours after adding the fruit there is no action in the fermentors.  So we had a discussion about whether or not to pitch more yeast.  We are considering splitting a packet of US-05 between the two.  I am worried that the yeast will not have the resources to ferment properly and may give us some off flavors.  Any thoughts/suggestions?

92
Equipment and Software / Re: Wort chiller
« on: September 23, 2013, 06:47:03 PM »
Any recommendations for a good, affordable submersion wort chiller?

50' coil of either 1/2 or 3/4 ID copper tubing
2 compression fittings with appropriate attachments for your water source.


+1

93
The Pub / Re: Take your homebrewing to a whole 'nother level - no, really!
« on: September 18, 2013, 04:27:17 AM »
"No I haven't been drinking officer...I have auto-brewery syndrome!"  :o

94
Kegging and Bottling / Re: About to keg my first beer, tips?
« on: September 17, 2013, 04:39:53 AM »
As far as sanitizing goes, I fill about a gallon of water and some starsan in the keg before kegging and shake up and dump.  Only needs a couple minutes contact time.  I sanitize my tubing with a spray bottle where I keep a mixture of distilled water and starsan.  It's just that simple.

95
The Pub / Re: Do Kiwis Know How To Play a Practical Joke, Or What?
« on: September 17, 2013, 04:36:44 AM »
Love it

96
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Trouble with gas posts
« on: September 08, 2013, 05:01:45 AM »

+1 to 7/8", box end 12 point wrench.

+1 and I have only one oddball keg that uses an 11/16" wrench.

97
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Will bitterness round out in keg?
« on: September 01, 2013, 06:42:22 PM »
Keg it. I usually like my beers better in the keg, fully carbed. I don't think the bitterness will mellow out, but I think other flavors will come to the fore and balance the beer more nicely.

98
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Irish Stout too watery
« on: August 27, 2013, 04:41:00 AM »
Should have a good mouthfeel according to the recipe. I suppose depending on how much top off water you added that could have something to do with it. Otherwise, as major was getting at, carbonation level can affect the mouthfeel. An undercarbonated beer can seem watery. You could try giving it a little more age. Not sure if there's a way to carbonate undercarbonated bottles since I only keg. Don't give up though. You will make great beer!

99
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast question
« on: August 26, 2013, 10:06:08 AM »
I'm another one who has tried both ways and settled on no rehydration.

So, Rehydrated < Dry

But is a yeast starter better than just sprinkling the dry yeast in? Or is that really just to boost pitching rate for higher OG beers?

Confusing I know.

I'm not sure if it's less.  This is just a group of brewers that in their experiences (and opinions), if you sprinkle it in/on dry, it works and saves you an extra step and the fermentation is good.  I too have done both and have had good results either way.  (If it was the best way I don't know, but the beer tasted good.)  I usually rehydrate because that's what the manufacturer says to do, and for me it's easier to pour into my carboy.  If/when I use a bucket, sprinkling the yeast on top would be easy.  I think the confusion comes from what the manufacturer says to do, compared to the practice of many accomplished brewers (of which I'm not one yet).  Bottom line is it's your brewhouse, and your the brewmaster, try brewing one each way and see what happens......

+1 Great advice!

100
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast question
« on: August 26, 2013, 09:44:27 AM »

I just wanted to be clear, as I'm switching to more and more dry yeast for $ reasons. Just "sprinkle" and walk away?  I've sometimes sprinkled and then shook or used my drill to give it a good swirl.  Is this a bad idea?
I think some of the idea behind sprinkling is to allow the cells to more slowly rehydrate as they sit on top. Immediately stirring may cause the cells to fill with sugary wort faster. I can't say it's bad, but maybe it's not good.

I used to sprinkle and walk away, but since I got my Blichmann plate chiller I can chill to pitching temps right away. So I fill the carboy half way then pitch the dry yeast as I fill the rest of the way. Still seeing attenuation as expected and no ill effects in the flavor department. YMMV

101
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What % Attenuation To Dry Hop At
« on: August 26, 2013, 08:20:08 AM »
Since the hop resins bind to the yeast, if you can drop most of the yeast out before you dry hop you will have better hop aroma. I wait till fermentation is finished, crash 10 degrees, wait a week and (if possible) dump yeast. Then add dry hops.

Otherwise you will notice that beer is very hop aroma forward when still cloudy with yeast but loses hop aroma much quicker as beer clears.

This makes sense.  However, I've heard hops can develop a vegetal/grassy flavor/aroma when added at lower temps.  I've never had this experience since I usually pitch after fermentation is complete and I've ramped the temp up a few degrees to help the yeast finish.  I have noticed that some of the beers, upon clearing up will lose aroma.  Have you experienced the vegetal/grassy notes I've heard about?

14 days of dry hopping at ale fermentation temperature seems like a LONG time.

If you want shortest time from grain to glass (with maximum amount of dry hop impact), you can tweak a few things in your process:

1. Start with healthy, active yeast and O2. Seems like you're pretty much there. An active yeast starter and an additional shot of O2 6-8 hours in may cut a day or so off primary fermentation. I've shortened primary (and conditioning) time even further by using an English yeast (S-04 or 1968 slurry), but if you don't like the attenuation levels or yeast flavor contribution, don't bother.

2. More hops, higher temp, less contact time. Matt B. from FW likes to dry-hop at the end of primary (>90% attenuation, lets say 2 SG points from target) for just 2-3 days, but with a large charge of hops at diacetyl rest temps.

I use his method - in the case of a 1.068 IPA, 3 oz hops for 2 days in primary. Matt does have the luxury of dropping the yeast to reduce the absorption as Keith mentioned, but at these hopping rates your bound to get a lot of extraction either way.

3. Dry hop twice: 75% of the total dry hop charge for 2-3 days at the end of primary, the other 25% for 3 days in the keg, before going into the kegorator. This brightens up the dry hop flavor/aroma and allows you to minimize O2 pickup during the last dry hop (add to keg before transfer and purge well).

Just my $0.02. Like with most things in brewing - there is no 'best' method!

The 14 days of dry hopping is two charges of hops.  So the longest would be 14 days.  It may be too long I suppose.  I like the idea of adding all of the dry hops at the end of primary.  I really have no way to drop the yeast off since I'm using carboys and I really prefer not to rack to secondary.  I could crash a few degrees I suppose, but that depends on what's in the fermentation chamber with the beer I'm crashing and what stage it's at. 

Good question.  For years I did what most people here do - wait until after high krausen subsides to add dry hops, for the reasons you mentioned. Works fine.  But after reading an article by Stan Hieronymus in Zymurgy a few issues issues ago, I tried his method, which was to rack to a secondary after fermentation and add dry hops away from the bulk of the yeast, when the beer was fairly clear. I used a hop combo that I had used before, and I found the overall hop character to be a little better.  He reasoned that some hop aroma/flavor compounds are formed in the presence of high levels of suspended yeast that are not thought of as desireable.  I think I will keep using his method as I had good results, but I spent years dryhopping after high krausen and made good beer then too.  Either way you will too.

After reading the same article, I did a little experiment recently.  I brewed 2 batches of the same beer.  One I let sit in primary for 4 weeks, then dry hopped with Amarillo.  The other I racked to secondary after 2 weeks, then dry hopped with Amarillo for 2 weeks.  The first batch developed a weird, intensely fruity aroma from the dry hops...not what I expect from Amarillo.  In the batch that had been removed from the yeast, I got the tangerine/lemon aroma I expect from Amarillo.  I'm convinced.

Very interesting.  So you always rack to secondary now?

102
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What % Attenuation To Dry Hop At
« on: August 25, 2013, 05:49:59 PM »

Good question.  For years I did what most people here do - wait until after high krausen subsides to add dry hops, for the reasons you mentioned. Works fine.  But after reading an article by Stan Hieronymus in Zymurgy a few issues issues ago, I tried his method, which was to rack to a secondary after fermentation and add dry hops away from the bulk of the yeast, when the beer was fairly clear. I used a hop combo that I had used before, and I found the overall hop character to be a little better.  He reasoned that some hop aroma/flavor compounds are formed in the presence of high levels of suspended yeast that are not thought of as desireable.  I think I will keep using his method as I had good results, but I spent years dryhopping after high krausen and made good beer then too.  Either way you will too.

This is also my current method.  I have been happy with the results, but am interested to hear from folks dryhopping into the primary.

I have always dry hopped in the primary. Usually after 2 weeks of fermentation. I've always had good results. I'm just trying to dial in the shortest amount of time to go from grain to glass while dry hopping and get the best results.

103
Yeast and Fermentation / What % Attenuation To Dry Hop At
« on: August 25, 2013, 04:19:41 PM »
Just trying to figure out when the ideal time to dry hop is.  I know you kind of want a little fermentation still going on to scrub out the oxygen generated by dropping the hops in, but how much fermentation is okay?  I don't want to scrub off the dry hops with the oxygen.  I have an IPA that's been fermenting for 7 days.  It was well oxygenated with pure O2 and pitching temps were 65-68* F.  I pitched US-05.  The OG was 1.068 and it is now at 1.016 (76% apparent attenuation, I believe).  I've gotten as high as 90% with this one before.  I have 14 days of dry hopping to do.  What are your thoughts?

104
Zymurgy / Re: chiller performance: sep/oct 2013
« on: August 22, 2013, 06:23:08 PM »
Too many theoretical variables. You okay at that

105
Ingredients / Re: All Zythos
« on: August 21, 2013, 05:20:52 AM »

Ok since we're on the topic...
I've always used crystals my IPAs and pale ales. I picked up 10 lbs of light Munich. I want to try and sub out the crystals. I don't mind crystals but I want to expand the horizons. What percentage of Munich would be ideal? 10%? I don't want a whole lot of malt taste. Basically for body and color. Thought about trying Maris Otter for 1/3 to 1/2 the bill too.

That depends on what you're looking for. Also, depends on your IBUs as to whether or not you'll taste it. I have found that when using unfamiliar malts I will do the nano-mash experiment at different percentages and try to imagine what that'd taste like with hops. The experiment is outlined a couple of issues of Zymurgy ago.

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