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Messages - alestateyall

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 65
1
Equipment and Software / Natural Gas
« on: February 04, 2016, 05:35:35 PM »
Slightly off topic but Costco in my city fills propane tanks to a full 20 pounds (instead of 15# you get with exchanges). They charge by the gallon of propane and they have a max charge of $8 to fill a tank. That makes natural gas slightly less attractive in my opinion.

2
Equipment and Software / Re: stick heater for mashing
« on: February 03, 2016, 12:46:40 PM »
You should look into the Hotrod heat stick.

https://www.brewhardware.com/product_p/hotrod.htm

I use a homemade heat stick (1500 W element) to heat water and to boil wort. I do 3G batches, so 1500W is enough. I have never tried to heat my mash with the heat stick. I have read about people doing so. But, I can speak intelligently about scorching.

PS. 1500W is the highest you can go on a 15A breaker/14AWG wire. 15A is the most common circuit type in homes.

3
Equipment and Software / Re: BEER BOTTLES
« on: February 02, 2016, 02:59:27 PM »

4
Homebrew Competitions / Re: 2016 NHC
« on: February 01, 2016, 07:00:48 PM »
I asked for 2 slots. It was very easy this year.

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Crazy fermenter pic
« on: February 01, 2016, 11:42:25 AM »
That's a plastic fermenter, fellas. I'll be honest I got it just so I could watch the action.

Re: Starsan. I did sanitize with Starsan but I don't think there was any noticeable Starsan bubbles after mix stir. I mix stirred the heck out of it. The entire beer volume was one giant white foam. It could have been Starsan sitting on top of the mix stir foam but I just assumed it was all mix stir foam. Mix stir related foam can be very persistent. It always seems to last until the krausen consumes it.

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: no sparge
« on: January 31, 2016, 05:06:09 PM »



So if I heat my sparge water as per my normal batch sparge procedure and then add the sparge water before draining the tun I will get a more malty beer flavor at the cost of lower efficiency?  Has anyone tried opening the gap on their mill to lower efficiency to get the same effect? Both would require extra malt in the mash to compensate for the lower efficiency.

I don't think it has anything to do with lower efficiency necessarily.  I'm also not sure I'd claim to get a maltier beer with no sparge.  Being subjective, that's kinda hard to quantify and AFIAK there is no empirical evidence to support that.
I took the more malty from the first page of this thread when someone ask what types of beer benefit from no sparge. Answer was malty beers. I guess I misinterpreted that to mean no sparge makes the beer more malty.

I'll have to try no sparge to see what it does to my beer.

Guilty. That was thrown out by me.

Another case of regurgitating info passed around. A 1ˢᵗ runnings beer is a no-sparge and has a maltier flavor, no?

Maybe there is a Δ between people's understanding of the process. I myself seem to have mixed up first runnings and no-sparge on a few occasions.

A real plus for no sparge seems to be pH stability.
Re: ph stability. In this thread folks recommend mashing with a normal water to grain weight ratio to avoid ph creep due to lack of buffer when mashing with all the water at once.
I am planning to try no sparge. I want to see what it does to my blonde ale.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: no sparge
« on: January 31, 2016, 03:21:38 PM »


So if I heat my sparge water as per my normal batch sparge procedure and then add the sparge water before draining the tun I will get a more malty beer flavor at the cost of lower efficiency?  Has anyone tried opening the gap on their mill to lower efficiency to get the same effect? Both would require extra malt in the mash to compensate for the lower efficiency.

I don't think it has anything to do with lower efficiency necessarily.  I'm also not sure I'd claim to get a maltier beer with no sparge.  Being subjective, that's kinda hard to quantify and AFIAK there is no empirical evidence to support that.
I took the more malty from the first page of this thread when someone ask what types of beer benefit from no sparge. Answer was malty beers. I guess I misinterpreted that to mean no sparge makes the beer more malty.

I'll have to try no sparge to see what it does to my beer.

Guilty. That was thrown out by me.

Another case of regurgitating info passed around. A 1ˢᵗ runnings beer is a no-sparge and has a maltier flavor, no?

Maybe there is a Δ between people's understanding of the process. I myself seem to have mixed up first runnings and no-sparge on a few occasions.

A real plus for no sparge seems to be pH stability.
Re: ph stability. In this thread folks recommend mashing with a normal water to grain weight ratio to avoid ph creep due to lack of buffer when mashing with all the water at once.

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: no sparge
« on: January 31, 2016, 01:56:40 PM »

So if I heat my sparge water as per my normal batch sparge procedure and then add the sparge water before draining the tun I will get a more malty beer flavor at the cost of lower efficiency?  Has anyone tried opening the gap on their mill to lower efficiency to get the same effect? Both would require extra malt in the mash to compensate for the lower efficiency.

I don't think it has anything to do with lower efficiency necessarily.  I'm also not sure I'd claim to get a maltier beer with no sparge.  Being subjective, that's kinda hard to quantify and AFIAK there is no empirical evidence to support that.
I took the more malty from the first page of this thread when someone ask what types of beer benefit from no sparge. Answer was malty beers. I guess I misinterpreted that to mean no sparge makes the beer more malty.

I'll have to try no sparge to see what it does to my beer.

9
All Grain Brewing / no sparge
« on: January 31, 2016, 01:40:47 PM »
So if I heat my sparge water as per my normal batch sparge procedure and then add the sparge water before draining the tun I will get a more malty beer flavor at the cost of lower efficiency?  Has anyone tried opening the gap on their mill to lower efficiency to get the same effect? Both would require extra malt in the mash to compensate for the lower efficiency.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Crazy fermenter pic
« on: January 31, 2016, 10:51:54 AM »
This morning I woke up to a double layer of bubbles in the fermenter (krausen and another layer sever inches above).



The picture above was taken 17 hours after pitching yeast slurry.  I believe the layer up top is a fine layer bubbles created by a long mix stir session. When fermentation started CO2 must have pushed those white bubbles up and suspended them several inches above the krausen. 

11
Equipment and Software / Growler Filler
« on: January 31, 2016, 10:41:32 AM »
Keg lube substitute: petroleum jelly (Vaseline). I think Petrol Gel (sold by many LHBS in place of keg lube) is the same as Vaseline. They certainly feel the same. I have used Vaseline before in place of Petrol Gel. Seemed to work just the same.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: January 30, 2016, 04:54:45 PM »
I need to make a cider for my bride.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: January 30, 2016, 04:41:47 PM »
Brewed up YABA-14 (Yet another Blonde Ale) today.  Hoping it's worthy of submission to NHC.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: January 30, 2016, 04:39:25 PM »

Just tapped my 2nd batch of fall 2015 apple cherry sparkling cider. Good stuff!



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Nice pic. Color makes it look tasty.

15
All Grain Brewing / Re: personal experience with old malt
« on: January 30, 2016, 08:17:03 AM »

I have two negative experiences with old malt, but they were both packaging issues.  One was open in a shed in Florida in the summer and was crawling with roaches.  I used it anyway and got poor efficiency, but it tasted OK.  The other was also treated the same way, but I think the maltster may not have dried it well enough, so that and the humidity here made it soft instead of crunchy.  Efficiency also suffered, but taste was good.
So if the container was sealed properly and the grain isn't soft, it's fine.
That is nasty. There is a beer store here that decided to dabble in homebrew ingredients. They bought crushed grain in 1 pound packs. I saw weevils crawling in one of the bags. I know it is supposedly ok but I passed.

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