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Messages - alestateyall

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2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Evaporation Rate
« on: March 26, 2015, 10:02:07 AM »

Most home brewers boil too rapidly.  I do not know where the "rolling boiling" thing originated in home brewing.  However, the boil only needs to strong enough to disturb the surface, which another forum member described as a "hard simmer."  Losing more than 15% per hour to evaporation has a negative effect on beer stability and quality.  I did not realize the difference a lower evaporation rate made until I started to use an induction range that was incapable of producing a hard boil.  The maximum amount of evaporation that should occur with 6.5 gallons in an hour is 0.975 gallons.  Ideally, the evaporation rate should be 0.65 gallons per hour.

What is lost from a quality perspective from a strong boil? Same question related to stability?

3
General Homebrew Discussion / try at batch sparging
« on: March 25, 2015, 01:38:07 PM »
I have done fly, batch, and BIAB.

I started brewing in the mid nineties. When I went all grain I did fly. I tried it 5-6 times. I used a gravity based fly sparge. Things went OK. But I wasn't a very good brewer then. Now I realize my beers had temp control and yeast pitch problems. I do agree with Mark there is a joy in getting a gravity based fly sparge system working. It's a nice engineering problem to solve. That being said, after half a year or so I gave up brewing due to the arrival of my first son.

Years later (12) I got back to brewing. I tried batch sparge. There is a lot of support available on the Internet forums so batch sparging is easy to learn. There was also a lot of horror stories about channeling and other issues with fly that may be exaggerations. I batch sparged for about 2 years with great success.

Then, I tried BIAB. I did that for a year. Again with great success. I liked the ability to heat the mash if I missed my temp target. But, inevitably when I did add heat I overshot my temp by a degree or two.

Now I have been back to batch sparging for about 1 year.

For apples to apples comparison. I have always done 5-6 gallon batches. Both BIAB and batch sparge take me about 4.5-5 hours. I am not rushing when I brew. 4.5-5 hours is what I want. Longer will annoy the wife. Shorter is not enough time for my dear hobby.

I can't compare batch and BIAB to fly. It was too long ago and I wasn't a very good brewer then. Fly sparge worked, wasn't really that hard, and I made beer.

Anyway, I like batch sparging. BIAB is easy but it always bothered me that BIAB let so much powder in the wort. The trub layer on a BIAB batch was always 50-100% thicker than a similar sized batch sparged beer. That was a slight hit on my Brewhouse efficiency that didn't really matter, but, it bothered me. It was enough trub that it partially covered the spigot on my Speidel and prevented me from using the spigot because I didn't want the trub in the keg. So, I went back to batch sparging.

My setup is cheap and easy and has been when brewing with all 3 methods.

4
Kegging and Bottling / Pinic tap hose length?
« on: March 25, 2015, 06:18:19 AM »
Slightly tangential , does any one make a picnic tap that actually works? The ones that came with my air keg set will not seal even at four psi. At about half a glass you start fiddling with them to stop the flow. Ten days to ordering Perlicks.
Mine work at 30PSI. Only been there a few times to unstick a clogged dip tube.

Yours could be cracked. Also, You can take them apart and clean a reseat the plunger. That may help.

5
Homebrew Competitions / First Competition
« on: March 24, 2015, 06:14:44 PM »
My most common mistake is not brewing to style. BJCP contests aren't people's choice contests. They judge on how well you hit your target style.

My beers peek at 6-7 weeks from brew day. So I would give myself that much time minimum. Yours may peek sooner. My beers take time to clear and always taste better when they do.

6
I agree the beer will still come out good. Silver lining: your son is definitely going to have to come over and help you drink that beer.

7
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Speidel 20l
« on: March 22, 2015, 06:47:54 PM »

My 30L is rough around the mouth. No problems with infections.

I brew 6G batches in my 30L all the time. 30L = 7.9G. Not trying to argue, Jim, but, I don't think you can ferment 7.9G in the 30L.
It would totally depend on how volcanic your fermentation was, huh?
Yes. I just can't imagine the 30L holding more that 7.9G total. But maybe it does. I am too lazy to measure total capacity.

8
Yeast and Fermentation / Speidel 20l
« on: March 22, 2015, 03:06:04 PM »
PS. One way to know the true capacity is to fill it with water and weigh it. 1G water is 8.35 lbs. My Speidel 30L weighs 4 lbs with spigot and lid.

Stand on your bathroom scale with and without the Speidel.

9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Speidel 20l
« on: March 22, 2015, 02:58:45 PM »
My 30L is rough around the mouth. No problems with infections.

I brew 6G batches in my 30L all the time. 30L = 7.9G. Not trying to argue, Jim, but, I don't think you can ferment 7.9G in the 30L.

10
Try http://brooklynbrewshop.com/beer-making-kits for 1 gallon recipe kits.

11
Ingredients / Re: Does Pilsner extract require a 90 min boil?
« on: March 17, 2015, 10:08:35 AM »


I also think it's possible , regardless of being labeled as pils dme, that it's a very pale 2 row extract that's sold as pils, more as a color designation. Given production constraints, it makes more sense. Regardless it's clean boiled 60, and I think Eric actually boils it like 15 or 20.
Briess Pilsen Light DME extract is made from 99% Pilsen malt and 1% Carapils according the data sheet.

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Assets/PDFs/Briess_PISB_CBWPilsenLightDME.pdf

Cool, good info. Nonetheless, I get no DMS from it on a shorter boil, so they are managing to remove it by boiling (or whatever).  Plus, it would probably discourage a lot of brewers to have to boil an extract for 90 minutes.
Yeah 90 minutes might intimidate. From reading on the web lots of people do 60 minute boil with AG Pilsner malts. I do 90 just in case.

12
Ingredients / Re: Does Pilsner extract require a 90 min boil?
« on: March 17, 2015, 09:57:51 AM »

I also think it's possible , regardless of being labeled as pils dme, that it's a very pale 2 row extract that's sold as pils, more as a color designation. Given production constraints, it makes more sense. Regardless it's clean boiled 60, and I think Eric actually boils it like 15 or 20.
Briess Pilsen Light DME extract is made from 99% Pilsen malt and 1% Carapils according the data sheet.

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Assets/PDFs/Briess_PISB_CBWPilsenLightDME.pdf

13
The Pub / Great draft list
« on: March 15, 2015, 07:30:17 PM »


funny i missed that about bastard. what i find funny and seemingly a trend, PBR is back.
It's been back for a while. Became the cheap beer of choice for hipsters a long while ago.
That I get and have seen. I'm more intrigued by it making its way onto a more sophisticated list of beer.
I found Corona Light more surprising.

Edit: I do love the line "One of only 25 local bars to carry it on tap."

14
Kegging and Bottling / Beer won't Come out of Keg :-(
« on: March 15, 2015, 10:13:21 AM »
I have had a few clogs overtime. In those cases I raised the gauge pressure to 30 PSI to serve a glass (it will be 90% foam). Remember to turn it back down and purge the co2 after.
On one unlucky batch the dip tube kept clogging every few days. I had to repeat the procedure each time.

15
Equipment and Software / Re: The Zymatic has landed!
« on: March 06, 2015, 08:40:07 PM »

Immersion chiller was my first thought, but there would be extra volume loss there. It wouldn't be much of a loss, but when brewing small, every ounce counts.
True. The other option is to grab the hot keg, put it in the ferm chamber, and come back in the morning with yeast.

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