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Topics - alestateyall

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1
Beer Recipes / Ordinary bitter carbonation
« on: March 08, 2014, 07:13:17 AM »
I am brewing an ordinary bitter. I am planning to use Jamil's recipe from Brewing Classic Styles. In the book he recommends carbonating to 1-1.5 volumes. That's seems very low.

He states "Since this beer is fairly light body, excessive carbon dioxide can make it seem extra thin, harsh, and hard to drink."

I am curious if mashing at a higher temp to increase body would be an alternative here? Jamil suggests mashing at 152F. I wonder if 160F would increase the body enough to carbonate at 2.4 volumes.

My keg set up has just 1 regulator and I leave it at 11 PSI which is about 2.4 volumes. Having one keg at 0.4 PSI (Beersmith recommendation for 1.5 volumes) would be challenging.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / 9 oz tumbler
« on: February 26, 2014, 03:41:59 PM »
I bought some 9 oz beer glasses. Now I can have 2 different beers on the same day without totally killing my diet.


3
Yeast and Fermentation / House Yeast
« on: February 21, 2014, 05:22:27 PM »
Is there a yeast that can be used across the range of English Pale Ales to American Ales to say a Kolsch?

For the English side of the spectrum I would want pleasant esters. For the American and Kolsch end of the spectrum I would want little to no esters.

I would hope to just vary temp to control the ester profile.

I live in a small town without a LHBS so yeast is always my biggest problem. Having a house yeast that I propagated for many batches would help tremendously.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Clear Beer!
« on: January 28, 2014, 05:17:18 PM »
I used to follow a thread on another forum with pictures of clear beer. I loved that thread.

So, I thought I would kick off a similar thread here.



This beer is Oz's Munich Hales. It is a Helles brewed with WLP029. The recipe has 2 lbs of wheat malt. I used 1 Tsp. of gelatin in the keg to clarify.

Let's see your clear beer.

5
Ingredients / Nelson Suckin
« on: January 24, 2014, 09:29:03 PM »
I am going to have to rename my Nelson Sauvin pale ale. I originally named it a hopeful "Lord Nelson Pale Ale."

Now I think I will call it "Choke on Some Lawn Clippings, Winey B#%tch Ale".

Just venting.

This recipe was doomed from the start. I called the LHBS to order 10 lbs of Vienna and 1 lb of Rye. When I got there the owner had mixed the two and milled them. I didn't want them together. My club is having an iron brewer contest with required ingredients; Nelson Sauvin, Rye Malt, & Kolsch yeast. The LHBS owner was very apologetic and he is a very nice guy so I said screw it I will just use Vienna as my base malt.

Now as you might suspect from the new name, the beer, at all hydro readings and after 1 week in the keg, tastes like white wine followed by a bag full of lawn clippings.  I had planned to save 2-3 bottles for the contest and donate the rest to a function at my kids school. That is 5 weeks away. I hope it gets better because "Choke on Some Lawn Clippings, Winey B#%tch Ale" may not go over well with the soccer moms.

The ill fated recipe:
10 # Vienna Malt
1 # Rye Malt
1 # Kolsch Malt (wanted a few more gravity points)
0.60 oz Chinook 11.6% 60 min
0.75 oz Nelson Sauvin 11.8% 10 min
0.75 oz Nelson Sauvin 11.8% 5 min
0.75 oz Nelson Sauvin 11.8% 0 min
0.75 oz Nelson Sauvin 11.8% dry 5 days
1L slurry WLP029 from Koslch
OG 1054

6
Equipment and Software / Johnson Controller Mod
« on: January 19, 2014, 06:53:31 PM »
I added some slide switches to my Johnson controller which connect to the two jumpers used to select between heating and cooling and cut-in cut-out modes.

Now I can switch between heating and cooling without opening the case to access the jumpers.



I am no Dremel artist as you can see. But, it works.

7
Equipment and Software / Natural Gas Burner Cost
« on: January 06, 2014, 08:30:48 AM »
I am exploring the idea of switching to natural gas.  In doing so I am exploring potential cost savings of natural gas versus propane.

The Blichmann Floor Burner can use propane or natural gas. With propane the Blichmann is rated at 72,000 BTU/hr and with natural gas it is rated at 60,000 BTU/hr.

First propane: one 15 lb. propane refill costs me $20. One lb. propane yields approximately 22,000 BTU. To burn the Blichmann for one hour it will take 72,000/22,000 = 3.27 lbs. of propane.  Propane costs $1.33 per lb. meaning running the Blichmann for 1 hour costs $1.33*3.27 = $4.35. 1179 BTU are required to bring one gallon of water to 212F from 70 F.  I boil 7 gallons, so 1179*7 = 8253 BTU are required to raise the temperature. The Blichmann in propane mode would require approximately 8253/72000*0.8 = 0.14 hours or 8.6 minutes to boil water.

Next natural gas: Based on my gas bill one CCF costs $0.744. One CCF of natural gas has approximately 100,000 BTU. Running the Blichmann for one hour will require 60,000/100,000 = 0.6 CCF which in turn costs $0.744*0.6 = $0.45.  The Blichmann in propane mode would require approximately 8253/60000*0.8 = 0.17 hours or 10.3 minutes to boil water. The difference in boil time will add a few cents to the natural gas bill.

My boil times seem too low. I used 80% efficiency. Maybe I should use a lower efficiency. Not sure.

Is the above math correct?

Bottom line it looks very cheap to use natural gas. However, since I would have to hire a plumber to run a gas line in my back yard it would likely take quite a while (I only brew once per month) to recover the upfront costs. I am assuming the plumbing costs would be $200 or more.


8
Equipment and Software / Broke my glass carboy today
« on: December 29, 2013, 03:47:12 PM »
Knocked the empty carboy over with the garden hose when disconnecting my wort chiller. The carboy lasted 3 years.

Fermenting in a kettle!

Silver lining: just ordered ordered a Speidel.

9
Homebrew Clubs / Fundraiser Question
« on: December 22, 2013, 05:34:53 PM »
My state, Mississippi, allows homebrewers to "remove the beer from the premises of the household where it is made and transport the beer only for the purpose of participating in a bona fide exhibition, contest or competition where homemade beer is being tasted and judged; however, homemade beer may not be sold or offered for sale under any circumstances."

So, would it be legal for a home brew club to hold a bonafide exhibition with an entry fee and then give people who pay to entry free beer?

Or could the club partner with a festival and provide beer to festival goers in return for payment to the club from the festival?

Or could the club set up at a farmers market, sell empty growlers and glasses and then fill them for free?

10
Equipment and Software / Can heater light bulb alternatives
« on: December 19, 2013, 12:37:57 PM »
I recently built a can heater to regulate the temperature in my fermentation chamber on cold days. The can heater uses a 60 Watt incandescent light bulb as a heat source.

As of Jan 1 60 Watt bulbs can no longer be manufactured in or imported into the USA.

Any suggestions for alternatives? Many of the new efficient bulbs produce far less waste heat.

The 60 Watt bulbs will probably be around for a while.

Maybe I can replace with a heat lamp?

Just wondering what people think.

11
Equipment and Software / NB Big Bubbler
« on: November 20, 2013, 07:29:46 PM »
Any thoughts in NorthernBrewer's new fermenter? Glass with wide mouth screw on lid. Two sizes 5 & 6.5g.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/big-mouth-bubbler-6-5-gallon.html

I have been wanting a new bigger fermenter. Every since I moved to BIAB I have been doing 6g batches and I want more headroom than my 6g fermenter provides.

Edit: originally I thought it was HDPE. Apparently it is glass with HDPE lid.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / oops - dumped ice in my kettle
« on: November 12, 2013, 03:33:51 PM »
I accidentally dumped a quart of ice into my fermenter when trying to freshen my ice bath. I wasn't paying attention and poured the ice onto the lid which then tilted into the kettle and dropped in the ice.

Hoping for the best. The beer was already down to about 120F when it happened so too cool to kill any bugs I may have poured in with the ice.

I have a good krausen now but I am wondering if the bugs may lay relatively low while the yeast ferments then become apparent after flocculation when they have had time to reproduce.

13
MS / GTRBrewers Starkville, MS Learn to Brew Day
« on: October 20, 2013, 08:03:59 AM »
The GTRBrewers will host a learn to brew day Nov 2. All are welcome.

Check @gtrbrewers on twitter for more information.

14
Beer Recipes / American Mild
« on: October 19, 2013, 02:15:12 PM »
I am a big fan of session beers that capture a style but have less calories and alcohol. I think more breweries should brew session beers.

I wanted an American Brown Session Ale. So I decided to shrink a recipe and see how it turned out. I am ecstatic. This beer has a lot of brown ale character with 1040 OG, 4.1% ABV, and 130 calories. I love this beer.

Taste: starts with a mild chocolate flavor.  Flavor ends with good dose of citrus and a lingering very mild (pleasant) bitterness. Dry finish.

Here is the recipe.

Batch size: 6 gallons
OG: 1040
SG: 1008
ABV: 4.1%
SRM: 14.9
5.66# Rahr Premium Pilsner malt
2.35# Rahr 2-row malt
0.4# Chocolate malt
0.26# Caramel 40 malt
0.2# Victory malt
0.15# Honey malt

0.75 oz Cascade (6.8%) @ 60
0.25 oz Cascade (6.8%) @ 15
1 whirlfloc tablet @ 15
1 oz Zythos (10.9%) @ flame out
1 pkg. US-05 yeast @ 64F

Mash at 150F for 1 hour.

Potential improvements: this beer might be improved with some Carapils/carafoam or other malt to increase the body. Might also just increase the mash temp. Also, I subbed pilsner malt because I was nearly out of 2-row. Using all 2-row might be better.

15
Commercial Beer Reviews / Samuel Adams Ruby Mild
« on: August 27, 2013, 06:56:25 PM »
This beer is included in the current Samuel Adams Harvest Collection variety pack.

Brewer description: Inspired by mild ales of the English railway boom, Samuel Adams Ruby Mild is a smooth, sweet, malty brew with a hint of ruby color and delicate hop note.

SRM 11
IBU 20
ABV 5.7%

At 5.7% this beer is no mild. However, despite being mislabeled, I really like it. The beer has a great mix of fruity esters and caramel malt flavors.  Sam Adam color description is right on. This is a very pretty beer with great clarity. Overall, I found myself wishing for more than 2 bottles of Ruby Mild in this mix pack.

Meanwhile, I continue to wait for good commercial milds and session beers for days when I want to cut calories but still want a beer.

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