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Messages - alestateyall

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To me the only real information gained here is that two different systems can make detectably different beer from the same recipe.

"Can," indeed, not necessarily "will."
That was my point. I don't think this experiment tells anymore about batch sparge vs fly than it does BIAB vs fly or your system vs mine. They are different so the same recipe may produce detectably different tasting results.

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Ingredients / Re: I need a new hop(s)
« on: January 11, 2016, 07:31:11 PM »

SINGLE HOP ( I left out C hops as single hop beers since pretty much everybody has tried that)

1/ Azacca - Mango/peach, citrus. It's kind of medium assertive so it works really well in APA and IPA but doesn't beat you over the head. I like it in a single hop APA. Blends with any C hop really well.

2/ Galaxy - Pungent citrus and tropical fruit. Good in hoppy APA and IPA. Works solo, but blends with C hops well, as well as Simcoe and Nelson Sauvin IMO. More pungent than Azacca but a great hop.

3/ Equinox - Unique hop. Citrus/lime and fruity/tropical. Really intense, resiny in a good way. Works well solo, but I blended it separately with Columbus, Chinook and Simcoe. Liked all three.



BLENDS - I usually shoot to balance citrus, tropical/fruity, and pine/dank.

Galaxy/Simcoe - nice balance of citrus, fruit, pine

Lemon Drop/El Dorado -  Use 2-2.5 Lemon Drop: 1 El Dorado.  It's the combo in Stone Delicious IPA.

Amarillo/Simcoe - been done a lot but it's a great combo of citrus/orange and pungent pine.

Amarillo/Citra/Columbus - balance of citrus, tropical, and dank.

Citra/Centennial/Chinook - citrus, tropical, and pine.

Cascade/Centennial - old school, but good

Mt Hood with C hops - work well together.

Mt Hood/Liberty - really nice together. Better than the sum of their parts.

Nelson/Galaxy - Pungent fruit/citrus bomb.


Tip of the iceberg. I left out Mosaic because I know you're not a fan. I'll edit more when I think of them.
Really great post.

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The kegs are good. One of mine that I just received had a little scratch in it though, deeper than it should be, so I'm sending it back. They're out of stock on the 2.5's for the moment, but the rep said they'd have more in on the 25th (hopefully). Definitely the way to go for smaller batches.
I think you'd be able to balance the lines plenty with picnic taps if it's 4 ft. Keep the freezer or beer at 36-38F (you can always let the beer warm up if it's too cold), have the regulator set to about 8-10 PSI. Should be fine. A friend of mine does this. But 5ft would be a safe bet.
I have used 10' lines since I started kegging 5-ish years ago. Last weekend when changing lines I decided to cut an old one in half and see what would happen. My measuring was off so I ended up with a 6' and 4' piece. To my surprise the 6' line works just fine. I didn't try the 4' line.

I am using a 2.5G keg with 6' line at 11 PSI. I can serve a beer with 1/3" of head.

244
To me the only real information gained here is that two different systems can make detectably different beer from the same recipe.

245
General Homebrew Discussion / 2.5G batches
« on: January 11, 2016, 10:30:41 AM »

I generally make 5 gallon batches.... However, from time to time I do make smaller batches (I have some 2.5 and 3 gallon kegs).  One of the things I really like about making smaller batches is I use a couple older 5 gallon corny kegs as fermenters.  I brew 3-3.5 gallons, ferment in the corny keg with a short dip tube, and then can transfer from the fermenting keg to 3 gallon serving keg under pressure with no siphon, no oxygen, etc.  Works really slick.
I just bought a 5 gallon keg specifically for that purpose. You can get spunding valves for the gas in disconnect and ferment under pressure using this setup as well.
What is the max pressure you can safely ferment under? It would be nice to attach a spunding valve the last few days and carbonate while finishing up fermentation.
I think it depends on the yeast strain. I've heard of professional breweries going as high as 2 atm (~30 PSI). I haven't used it for pressurized ferments yet, but the valve I have maxes out at 15 PSI.
I wonder if that is 2 atm gauge pressure or actual.

246
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 2.5G batches
« on: January 11, 2016, 09:02:05 AM »

I generally make 5 gallon batches.... However, from time to time I do make smaller batches (I have some 2.5 and 3 gallon kegs).  One of the things I really like about making smaller batches is I use a couple older 5 gallon corny kegs as fermenters.  I brew 3-3.5 gallons, ferment in the corny keg with a short dip tube, and then can transfer from the fermenting keg to 3 gallon serving keg under pressure with no siphon, no oxygen, etc.  Works really slick.
I just bought a 5 gallon keg specifically for that purpose. You can get spunding valves for the gas in disconnect and ferment under pressure using this setup as well.
What is the max pressure you can safely ferment under? It would be nice to attach a spunding valve the last few days and carbonate while finishing up fermentation.

247
General Homebrew Discussion / 2.5G batches
« on: January 11, 2016, 06:00:32 AM »
appreciate all the new feedback as well!
some follow up questions:

so if i carb my keg at room temp, lets just say its at 15 psi

if i put the keg into the fridge to chill afterwards, will the psi of the keg change from 15?

if it does do i then look for the proper psi to adjust to for the given new temperature?

also, would also putting in the room temp co2 tank have an effect on the psi?


I have a feeling once i have a keg i might be able to answer most of these though -.-
Say your room is 72F and you want to carb to 2.4 volumes of co2. In this case, you will set you regulator to 28.4 psi and leave the keg attached to the regulator at that setting in that temp room for 10-14 days. Now it's carbed.

Next you move it to the fridge. If you disconnect from the regulator and place it in the fridge at 39F the head pressure will drop to 10.7 psi but the amount of co2 in the beer will still be 2.4 volumes.

When you are ready to serve you will want to connect to the regulator. You don't want to change the carbonation level so you set the regulator at 10.7 psi serving pressure.

I made all the above calculations from Beersmith mobile.

In reality 29-30 psi at room temp is fine. When placing in fridge, turn down the regulator to 10-11 psi.

One more thing, you are better off carbonating in the fridge at serving pressure. It's less complicated. Just put it in the fridge, set the pressure to 11 psi and wait. If your impatient like me, try a half pint every few days to see how it's coming along.

248
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 79% AA with WLP002
« on: January 10, 2016, 06:21:54 PM »


If I wanted to lower the attenuation to be closer to style should I raise the mash temp, change the base malt or something else?


You could try both, but I wouldn't do it at the same time. A good start is to mash 3 or 4 degrees warmer and see where you finish. And of course there's the option to use more specialty malts which generally raise FG. But if you like the overall flavor of the beer and don't want to mess with your grist %, incrementally raising mash temp and keeping good notes is the best option.

Edit -  Finding a less attenuative strain is another option too (obviously).
I am more likely to try a different malt or yeast than brew the same thing twice.  I am planning an English Pale malt next.

249
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 79% AA with WLP002
« on: January 10, 2016, 05:53:22 PM »


We're you thinking that this was too high? Because it sounds right to me. I almost always hit the upper 70's for attenuation with that strain.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
Yes. I was expecting lower based off the specs for the yeast. White labs says to expect 63-70%.

That was the 3rd generation of using that yeast. The batch before did get 72% AA with 152.6F mash temp. So, I guess 79% isn't too surprising given the lower mash temp and a different base malt (Muntons extra pale Maris Otter vs Briess Pale malt, maybe more fermentable).

Yeast specs make much less difference than wort fermentability.  Using the same yeast I can get anywhere from 65-85% attenuation depending on the wort.
I am learning. Like I said the beer is great.

If I wanted to lower the attenuation to be closer to style should I raise the mash temp, change the base malt or something else?

250
Kegging and Bottling / First Time Kegging System Questions
« on: January 10, 2016, 03:24:23 PM »
appreciate all the responses so far!

for the co2 tank, will the ones I buy from suppliers be any different in fittings/etc from the ones on the homebrewing sites?

as for the kegs. they do seem cheaper on AIH, but can anyone tell me if there's any difference between the draft brewers ball lock keg/ corny ball lock kegs/ other ball locks? thanks!
re: co2 tanks. The ones from airgas and nexair have the same fittings as from homebrew shops.  Airgas/nexair sell to all the restaurants in town. The sell food grade co2. They sell to the paint ball and fire extinguisher stores also. They sell steel and aluminum tanks. Ask Aluminum. They may not have any in stock that day but Aluminum is much lighter.

Re: kegs. There are 2 types of legs.  Coke (pin lock) and Pepsi (ball lock). Ball lock is more popular with brewers. AIH sells some Coke legs reconfigured as ball locks. The Coke kegs are shorted and fatter; 9" diameter versus 8.5".   AIH has lots of choices. Most of the other differences are handle type and origin. Some are better quality than others. NSF certified is a good quality indicator.

251
Kegging and Bottling / First Time Kegging System Questions
« on: January 10, 2016, 03:16:32 PM »
I can address a few of your other questions.

1. You don't need to anything special when filling a keg half way. The regulator will fill the empty volume with co2 at your pressure set point. You will need to purge more when you first fill. You want to get all the oxygen out.

2. Excessive trub can clog the dip tube. You need a lot of trub to clog it. Otherwise more trub just means cloudier beer.

3. When force carbing pick the amount of co2 you want in your beer (probably 2.3-2.5 volumes). Use the chart at link below to get the correct pressure set point for the current temperature. When you move the keg to the fridge look up new set point for new temp (but same volume of co2).

http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php

Look into kegconnection.com and beverageelements.com. Both have good deals for keg setups. Much better than northernbrewer. Look at keg kit 3 from beverage elements. It's a much better deal than NB.

252
Kegging and Bottling / Re: First Time Kegging System Questions
« on: January 10, 2016, 03:05:22 PM »
Don't buy an empty co2 tank for $99 either. It's worth $50. Furthermore, where will you fill that tank? There are 2 options; paintball place may fill. Welding supply will exchange. Don't buy a new tank just to exchange for an old one. The welding suppliers (airgas, nexair) will sell a used one full of co2 for around $50.

253
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Questions about competitions...
« on: January 10, 2016, 02:59:46 PM »
I had a bad batch of PU last year. I  complained to the distributor. They sent me a check (quickly).

254
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: January 10, 2016, 09:38:12 AM »

Isn't the Giga 021 more similar to 2565 than 029 (in other words, has kolsch character) ?  And how hard is it to clear ?  BTW, nice looking beer.

Yes it is, and flavor is way better than 029 IMO. I pulled this 750ml off the keg before I added gelatin on Friday night.  It is similar to 2565 in that it keeps a bit of haze.  Taste is similar to the 2565 smoothness and wine like flavor.  I turned it down in primary to 35 for 2 weeks before I kegged.  We will see early this week how bright it is after the gelatin.   
It looks pretty bright pregelatin.

255
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Questions about competitions...
« on: January 10, 2016, 09:35:18 AM »
1. No
2. Many would do poorly. Commercial beers often push style boundaries or don't worry about style at all.

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