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Messages - alestateyall

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241
Pimp My System / Re: My automated brew system
« on: October 06, 2014, 06:10:01 PM »

I brew like a simple pot on a stove. Because I think it is important to brew in a reproducible way I use automation to achieve this. Actually I use a predecessor of Tcontrol to control all the mash steps temperatures and timings. All the brewing is done without a pump. The inside of the kettle is RVS the outside is iron.



Mash tun with stirring motor on top and direct heater which is controlled by a proportional valve from a central gas heater. A handmade PCB with some I2C components is the interface to the parallel port of the brewing PC.
The stirrer used in the kettle is driven by 24 Vdc which is speed controlled by the PC depending on the heating in the last minutes.



On the brewing PC I fill in the mash scheme for this beer.



The home made brewing program is called BeerPID. The program BeerPID is not a PID controller anymore but uses a feedback an feed forward analog algorithm. Digital temperature sensors measure the temperature of the wort.


This photo shows the bottom side of the mash tun during heating. Also the wiring of the electrical ignition and the flame monitoring sensor can be seen.

After mashing the mash tum is hoisted on the counter with a electrical cable hoist.


The heating of the sparge water is automatically started after the mashing and regulated to 82 degrees Celsius during the sparge.

The sparge water bucket is about 25 liter. It contains a chip fryer heating element mounted 4 cm above the bottem into the water.

After filtering and sparging the boiling starts.

The software detects the start of the boiling so the first hop can be added. A timer on the screen is used to give alarm when next hop or sugar should be added.
PID, I2C, PCB, Vdc, digital, analog, feedback, feed forward; I am guessing you are an electrical engineer!

242
Kegging and Bottling / Ever have a keg post leak?
« on: October 06, 2014, 05:59:45 PM »
There is an oring on the dip tube which may need to be replaced. Also you may need a new poppet if it was leaking out of the top of the post (though I see the leak appears at the base of the post.)

243
Equipment and Software / Re: Reminder - Pressure can hurt you
« on: October 06, 2014, 11:42:17 AM »
I think my worst mistakes are compound mistakes when I panic (often over something not worth sweating in the first place). Good reminder. Thanks.

244
Kegging and Bottling / Force carb vs Keg conditioned
« on: October 06, 2014, 11:37:18 AM »

Personally i mostly set to 38F and set to 11 or 12psi and leave it alone however, depending on the style i use a homemade spunding valve.  I will rack the beer to keg when it is around 6 to 8 gravity points away from finial attenuation and set pressure to desired setting for temp and let sit for 2 weeks then hook up to co2 to maintain that level. I enjoy this method and it has its challenges but produces a finer/lacier mouth-feel.

Though I did not know how to describe it, this "finer/lacier mouth-feel" is what I must be missing in forced carb beer. I've been reading more about Cask Conditioned Ales and may try this. I'm just not satisfied with the results of my force carbonating.

CO2 is CO2 no matter what the source.  Properly applied CO2 from a tank, allowed to fully dissolve into the beer, will be indistinguishable from any other source.
Thanks for clarifying. I was wondering about that.

245
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Tank Size
« on: October 05, 2014, 01:00:01 PM »
I exchange my tanks at airgas. They try to give me Aluminum if they have one. They usually don't. I don't care and I never ask, but, the folks there always tell me they tried to find Aluminum. 

5# last me at least 6 months maybe longer.

246
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Yellowhammer Brewing Rebellion
« on: October 05, 2014, 09:35:38 AM »

Thanks!

I hope your's wasn't as flat as it looks in the picture though!   :-\
Slow pour in a non beer clean glass. It wasn't flat.

247
Commercial Beer Reviews / Yellowhammer Brewing Rebellion
« on: October 04, 2014, 04:23:58 PM »
Drinking one now from a brown bottle purchased at Wish You Were Beer of Madison, AL. Made by majorvices.

Very nice. I also really like the label.

 

248
Kegging and Bottling / Force carb vs Keg conditioned
« on: October 01, 2014, 06:53:49 PM »
I generally set and forget at 11-12PSI at 38F. I drink a pint at weekly intervals until I think the beer is ready. Usually it is carbed after 1-2 weeks. Usually I think the beer is properly conditioned after 2-3 weeks. Lighter beers and gelatin speed things up.

PS. I have tried using table sugar to carb on my last 2 kegs. It works. It saves co2. No negatives. I do worry about leaving a keg of beer in a warm closet in the summer.

249
Kegging and Bottling / Re: How long does kegged beer stay fresh?
« on: October 01, 2014, 05:25:40 AM »
PS. 3 gallons in a 5 gallon keg is no problem. Just remember to flush the head space with co2 when you fill the keg.

250
Kegging and Bottling / Re: How long does kegged beer stay fresh?
« on: October 01, 2014, 05:24:07 AM »
Keg beer lasts a long time. Longer than you would take to finish. IPAs and other high aroma beers may fade a bit. But I think even those will be fine at your pace. Others can comment on those. I ant brew too many IPAs.

I am in the same boat on the weight. I have cut home brew to weekends only.

251
All Grain Brewing / Re: Pre and post boil gravity estimates
« on: September 28, 2014, 11:32:35 AM »
Thanks. I will have to try using Brix and see what happens to my error.

252
All Grain Brewing / Re: Pre and post boil gravity estimates
« on: September 28, 2014, 09:54:18 AM »
I don't understand your comment about 7G boiling down to 5.5G. Why is the gravity 1.0645 not 1.0636? What am I missing?

253
All Grain Brewing / Re: Pre and post boil gravity estimates
« on: September 28, 2014, 09:30:13 AM »

I wonder how much hot and cold break contribute. Is it negligible or significant?
Are you accounting for the fact that "gravity points" aren't linear? 7.0 gal of 1.0500 wort would boil down to 5.5 gal at 1.0645, not 1.0636, for example.

No. The equation I cited definitely has a linear relationship. Is there a better model?

254
All Grain Brewing / Re: Pre and post boil gravity estimates
« on: September 28, 2014, 09:23:14 AM »

I wonder how much hot and cold break contribute. Is it negligible or significant?

It's not just negligible, it's zero. The hot and cold break proteins are suspended in the wort, not dissolved. Same for the hops - they don't increase the volume of the wort, they just displace it. There are some hop components that are dissolving, but I don't think that would be measurable. Alpha acids are the major one, and even that's at the ppm level.

Are you accounting for the fact that "gravity points" aren't linear? 7.0 gal of 1.0500 wort would boil down to 5.5 gal at 1.0645, not 1.0636, for example.

What are the error bars on your measurements? If you're measuring gravity to ±0.0005 SG and volume to ±0.05 gal, then in the example above, the error in post-boil gravity is ±0.0017 SG. Errors for multiplication and division are additive.

Sean, I know that the contribution of the hot an cold break to Gravity is zero post boil because the break is particulate and particles do not contribute to the liquid's specific gravity. My question is how much does that same material affect the preboil gravity measurement when it is part of the liquid (before a chemical reaction causes it to drop out). If the preboil gravity is slightly higher due to this it will affect the predicted post boil gravity using the GP equation.

255
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's brewing?
« on: September 28, 2014, 09:09:24 AM »
Hopped up Janet's Brown! That beer is pretty hoppy to start with. Great beer.

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