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Messages - PeckerWood

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1
All Things Food / Re: BBQ Style
« on: April 06, 2013, 07:51:01 PM »
Awesome! I made my wife get me one for my birthday this past January. I love it! I got the 22.5" one with a Cajun Bandit stainless steel door and pimp kit along with the BBQ Guru DigiQ. I don't know if I'll ever use my kitchen again!

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All Things Food / Re: Sous-vide
« on: December 22, 2012, 08:44:19 AM »
I have a food saver and just saw this food scientist on tv a few weeks ago showing how to do this, and those steaks look amazing. I'll have to give it a whirl. Anybody know the name of the cookbook? He has a large book-set for science and also a home-type cookbook that anyone can use.

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All Things Food / Re: Kitchen Knives
« on: December 22, 2012, 08:33:31 AM »
I'm a big fan of Wusthof. I bought the Grand Prix starter set 15 years ago to use while attending culinary school, and I still use those knives everyday. It turned into a collection over the years, making many great gifts along the way, and now have a 35 slot cherry block. To save you a lot of money, if I had to pick one knife I use the most, by far it would be the 7" Santuko Knife. I suggest going to CutleryandMore.com, they always have a Wusthof sale going on. If I had to do it all over again, I'd switch to the Classic Ikon series, they are bad-ass but very expensive. The Grand Prix II are very cost efficient forged steel knifes that are a good looking solid set that will last a lifetime.

4
I'd have to say that my favorite all time is my BumFishDick 75 Minute IPA. I love the flavor of Dogfish Head's 90 minute and love the drinkability of Dogfish Head's 60 minute. So I found both recipes and kind of took the best of both to give me exactly what I was looking for in a beer at around 7.5%. I gotta make that one agin, it's been too long.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: your experiences in moving to 10g?
« on: October 03, 2012, 07:31:30 PM »
I honestly didn't care for my plate chiller. Too hard to sanitize and clean. And the plate chiller won't chill your wort cooler than your summer ground water temp.

IC is my suggestion. Stress free sanitization. Hose off, drop in boil last 20 minutes. WP  with a spoon or pump and you can get down to 80-90 degrees pretty quickly during hot summer month. Drop in temp controlled fridge or freezer or give ice water bath to drop  to pitching temps.

It's easy to clean.  Just hook up the backflow adapter to flush out the inside, stick in a pot and bring to a boil to sanitize.  Drain upside down and you're done.  The addition of using my immersion chiller inside a bucket of ice water in conjuction with the plate chiller brings the temperature of the water-in down very rapidly.  And the Thrumometer in addition verifies the wort out temperature going directly into the fermenter while aerating as it falls in at 67 degrees.  It's definitely a little more money having both, but in my opinion, time is money and this saves a lot of time.  An immersion chiller alone is a good option, absolutely, I've used it, but it used so much more water and took a lot more time.  But a plate chiller is just so much faster in my opinion, and the 2 together are Wow!!

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Kegging and Bottling / Re: How fast do you carbonate?
« on: October 03, 2012, 05:32:38 PM »
I usually keg, co2 burp, chill overnight and hook up to co2 tank at 25psi and shake both kegs for about 10 minutes.  I let it rest overnight at 25 psi and burp again the next day and set it at around 12 psi.  It's ready to go right then and there but usually takes about a week to have the ideal carbonation and mouthfeel.

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Kegging and Bottling / Re: Summit Kegerators
« on: October 03, 2012, 05:24:52 PM »
I bought the Summit SBC500JBL 7 years ago with a brass 2 tap.  Never had any problems with it, and it easily fits 2 corny kegs and a 10 lb co2 tank inside.  You might be able to fit a 3rd corny inside with the co2 outside, but can't guarantee it.  I can't check for you either as I have a 30" copper pipe insulated inside the tower running straight down as my beerlines go up inside. They will remain cold inside the tower, thus dispensing a very minimul amount of foam on the first pour. 

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: AHA Membership
« on: October 03, 2012, 05:10:24 PM »
I finally joined after debating over a year and finally said screw it, this is what I love, this is my passion, and I'm going to be doing it for a lifetime; so I'll join for a lifetime. I'll even add my best friend, wife, and brother to the list, so we can all go out the the local Iron Hill and save a few bucks every time.  It's always a good time, and now I have more incentive to go out for a few new craft beers. Maybe I'll find a little inspiration for what the next batch will be. This is a good cause and I stand for it.

Welcome to the forum.  You from Philly?

Hello!  Yes, well I live just north of Philly, but I actually work in the PHL airport as a bartender in Terminal F.  I run into a lot of homebrews there!

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: One of the best brew days ever
« on: October 03, 2012, 05:06:15 PM »
Good for you!  I have a love/hate relationship with brewing in the rain, as it always seems to be muddy out on my brewdays. I'm coming in and out of the house a hundred times over 9 hours (I do 2 ten gallon AG batches on brewday).  I'll never forget brewing in a severe thunderstorm, where water was coming down like buckets just outside.  I brew under my deck and had to put a tarp down above and have a beach umbrella over the boil kettle.  I was soaked!  The best feeling after days like that is when you're all done cleaning up, yeast is pitched, everything is put away, and you get into some dry clothes after a shower.  Having that first sip after putting your feet up for the day is the best.  Here's to a job well done and to what will shortly be coming out of that fermenter!

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: AHA Membership
« on: October 03, 2012, 04:55:17 PM »
I finally joined after debating over a year and finally said screw it, this is what I love, this is my passion, and I'm going to be doing it for a lifetime; so I'll join for a lifetime. I'll even add my best friend, wife, and brother to the list, so we can all go out the the local Iron Hill and save a few bucks every time.  It's always a good time, and now I have more incentive to go out for a few new craft beers. Maybe I'll find a little inspiration for what the next batch will be. This is a good cause and I stand for it.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: composting spent grain
« on: October 03, 2012, 04:23:03 PM »
Oh man, the pine trees in my back yard must have a thousand pounds of spent grain over the years and it looks like nothing but pine needles; so it decomposes very quickly.  So either make a compost pile, find a dog treat recipe, or even go as far as finding a local farm, as do most breweries.  They give them the spent grains.  My local brewery has a truck that picks up the grains and in return, cut them a deal on a good price for organic beef.  Or just keep throwing them out and they'll decompose in a landfill. 

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash pH and water adjustments
« on: October 03, 2012, 04:14:04 PM »
The easiest way I can think of getting the best brewing water is I bought the Pacific Sands Garden Hose Filter hooked up to a drinking water hose.  I also add the 5.2 ph Stabilizer to my mash along with a pinch of gypsum.  This takes all the guesswork out of what my water report says.  I always get great results and around 85% efficiency.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: your experiences in moving to 10g?
« on: October 03, 2012, 04:03:38 PM »
GET A PLATE CHILLER!!!

It is going to take you much longer, especially in summer months, to chill your wort with an ice bath or a decent immersion chiller.  The Blichmann Therminator along with the Thrumometer is great! It saves me so much time and water vs. using an immersion chiller.  I actually use my immersion chiller inside a bucket of ice water hooked up to the Therminator to chill 11 gallons of wort in about 5-10 minutes which is the amount of time it takes to drain my wort in the fermenter since the counterflow water chilling the beer is now colder than the ground water. Drain at full speed.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: 1st 10 gallon batch
« on: October 03, 2012, 03:54:00 PM »
10 gallons is the way to go.  For the same amount of work and cleaning involved with just a tiny bit more time added for heating a larger volume, it's worth it.  You get double the beer :-/   <--this is my "do I need to say do the math" face :-D

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Best size boil kettle for 10 gallon batches
« on: October 03, 2012, 03:48:21 PM »
I started out with the Blichmann Boilermaker 15 gallon kettle for 5 and 10 gallon batches and got great use out of it.  You just have to be very careful during the hot break.  I now use that as my HLT after upgrading my system to a 3 tier brewstand.  My new boil kettle is a 20 Gallon Blichmann Boilermaker, and all I can say is...IT IS GREAT! No chance of a boilover! So I don't have to be so careful with turning down the flame during the hot break.  Plus, it's only a few dollars more than the 15 gallon kettle.  Blichmann is a bit pricey, but the way I look at it is: I'm going to be doing this for a very long time so I want something that lasts, it has every feature needed like a brewmometer, dip tube, sanitary ball valve, sight glass, lid easily hangs from the handles, can add a false bottom if later in life you want to have a larger heated mash tun,  it's made of a great quality stainless steel, PLUS it looks bad-ass in my brewery.

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